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NEWS
July 21, 2010
Rob Kasper's "editorial" about Artscape (Editorial notebook: "Artscape, a grouch's view," July 17) was interesting. Wait until we have the upcoming proposed NASCAR races in the Inner Harbor area, with spectators expected to double along with the irritations to neighbors and people driving in or near the area. Richard L. Lelonek, Baltimore
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
With all of the beeping of machines and checking of vital signs, patients in the intensive-care unit often have trouble sleeping. This, along with other hospital conditions, like lack of natural light and familiar surroundings, can lead to disorientation. It's called ICU psychosis, and while it's unsettling to patients and their families, it's not likely to last all that long, according to Dr. Chaitanya Ravi, director of LifeBridge Health Hospitalist Services. What is ICU psychosis and what are the main symptoms of it?
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NEWS
By Kirby Mills, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Several bicyclists were injured after someone threw tacks along a Leonardtown race course Sunday, officials said. In a press release, the St. Mary's County Sheriff's Office asked for the public's help in identifying the person who disrupted Patuxent Velo Cycling Club's Leonardtown Criterium Cycling Event. Crashes caused by the tacks left several racers injured, including at least one participant who suffered a broken bone. Cyclists commonly travel at speeds of 30 miles per hour or more in such racing events.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
We take the Baltimore County Police Department at its word that its officers were just trying to give some helpful tips to a pair of Dundalk activists about the rules of decorum at County Council work sessions and not trying to intimidate them into silence about their opposition to County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's proposed redevelopment of a government building in the community. Even if the meeting earlier this month between three officers and a pair of community activists really was intended as a "polite and friendly way to discuss concerns about protocols," as the police department's spokeswoman put it, the whole business still stinks, which Chief Jim Johnson correctly concluded after reviewing the incident.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Amtrak service between Washington and New York and Philadelphia and Harrisburg, Pa., was back to normal for the evening rush hour Tuesday after an early-morning service disruption. About 30 Amtrak trains in the Northeast were delayed from 11 minutes to almost two hours Tuesday because of a low-voltage problem. The disruption began shortly before 8 a.m., and power was restored about an hour later. The cause of the outage was under investigation. The outage also disrupted MARC service on the Penn Line, which is operated by Amtrak.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Amtrak train service has been restored after a complete shut-down between Washington and Philadelphia earlier Wednesday, an Amtrak spokesman said. The overhead power system was damaged south of Elkton at around 10:30 a.m., with hundreds of passengers stuck on several trains until about 1 p.m., said Craig Schulz, the Amtrak spokesman. MARC train service north of Martin State Airport was also disrupted, but had been restored with minor delays as of about 5 p.m., Maryland Transit Administration spokesman Terry Owens said.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1991
NEW YORK AIDS activists rushed onto the sets of the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and PBS's "MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour" last night, disrupting the live broadcasts with their protests about the lack of news coverage of AIDS during the Persian Gulf crisis.As Rather was beginning the CBS evening newscast, one protester jumped in front of the camera, shouting, "Fight AIDS, not Arabs!" The camera shifted off Rather and then momentarily went to black.Rather later mentioned the incident on the air, saying, "I want to apologize to you for the way the broadcast came on the air tonight.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | January 3, 2008
Shifting sensitive defense work being done at Fort Monmouth in New Jersey to Aberdeen Proving Ground could disrupt the war effort if the Army fails to replace the many workers who are likely to quit or retire rather than move, the Pentagon acknowledges. In a report to Congress, Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England writes that officials plan to minimize the upheaval from the base move by relocating its 5,200 workers gradually over the next three years and recruiting military retirees locally to fill the many vacancies expected.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1994
Ice accumulating on the overhead power lines knocked out the Central Light Rail Line yesterday.It was the first time freezing rain has forced the closing of the entire 22.5-mile-long system for a full day, and the third time bad weather has disrupted service in less than a month.Service is unlikely to be restored until temperatures rise above the freezing mark, Mass Transit Administration officials said last night.Passengers have not been stranded by the shutdown, but they have been delayed.
BUSINESS
By John Rivera | June 28, 1991
The massive telephone disruption Wednesday caused more than mere inconvenience and aggravation to some Marylanders.The day after the disruption, residents and business owners were relieved to have their phone service back, but many were angry at the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. One man, who is president of a telephone answering service, said he wants the phone company to reimburse him for business that he lost."
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Baltimore principals will be required to take extra steps before suspending 4- and 5-year-olds under a new policy that seeks to curb the practice of kicking the youngest students out of school. Beginning next school year, principals will have to consult with the central office before they suspend pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students for any length of time — a move that comes after The Baltimore Sun revealed a sharp uptick in pre-K suspensions in Baltimore, which had the most of any district in the state.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
It was either Fourth of July fireworks or nature's own pyrotechnics. For the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Country Club and the towns of Mount Airy and Manchester, Thursday's threat of lightning, hail and heavy downpours was enough to postpone early Independence Day celebrations. Organizers of fireworks displays for the soldiers of Fort Meade and at the Suburban Club in Pikesville meanwhile planned to brave the weather. After a hot, humid and stormy week with the looming threat of Hurricane Arthur, some, like Ocean City officials, chose to take advantage of the calendar and shift celebrations from Friday's iffy forecasts to Saturday's unseasonably cool, dry and clear weather.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Some of the residents of the Rodgers Forge neighborhood that borders Towson University's softball stadium are alumni of the school and fans of the Tigers. They understand the university's desire to build a $2 million new facility this summer and bring the program up to NCAA Title IX standards. They just don't want it 25 feet from their backyards. The roughly two-dozen neighbors, who last month formed an ad-hoc committee to protest a new complex, rallied outside the university Saturday morning, saying the school has refused to negotiate with them on the plans.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Storms that pummeled the Baltimore region Friday meant headaches for travelers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport as flights were cancelled and delayed throughout Friday event. As of this morning, flights at BWI had returned to a normal schedule. Southwest Airlines, the dominant carrier at BWI, reported that about a dozen flights were cancelled, out of 205 scheduled departures. But because most other flights were full, they could not be rebooked Friday.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, Kevin Rector and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Baltimore area's biggest late-April storm system in decades dumped as much as 7 inches of rain in some parts of the region, closing schools and businesses as rainwater overflowed tributaries and sewers, toppled trees and flooded roadways. About 20 people evacuated when their Charles Village street collapsed onto a CSX railroad track Wednesday joined hundreds in Laurel displaced by the storm, which tied a 1947 record with more than three inches of rainfall at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport on Wednesday alone.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
An Amtrak train tore down overhead catenary power lines in an accident near Bowie on Thursday morning, disrupting rail traffic in the area and the commutes of many MARC and Amtrak riders, according to the Maryland Transit Administration. Craig Schulz, an Amtrak spokesman, said the incident occurred about 9:30 a.m. and left the Northeast Corridor train No. 181 — carrying 177 passengers — without power. It also stopped all Amtrak and MARC traffic between Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Soon after a shooting at the Johns Hopkins Hospital complex yesterday, police moved quickly to restore access to the facility and minimize disruption to medical activities — delivering a message encouraging patients to keep their appointments even before the incident was resolved. About an hour after a gunman identified as 50-year-old Paul Warren Pardus reportedly killed his mother and wounded a doctor before barricading himself in a room at the Nelson Building, police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi told reporters that patients "were still encouraged to come to the hospital.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2008
The Army faces "significant challenges" in moving its communications, surveillance and electronics operations from Fort Monmouth, N.J., to Aberdeen Proving Ground without disrupting the military's war effort, according to a new congressional report that warns of potential staffing shortages and difficulties in quickly providing security clearances to new workers. Turnover is expected to be so high among the veteran scientists and engineers now working at the New Jersey base that it might take the Army until 2019 or 2024 to fill all the vacant positions and fully train the new employees, the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, warned in its report.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Former Maryland basketball star Walt Williams, who currently serves as an analyst on the team's radio broadcast at home games, said Wednesday that he heard sophomore forward Charles Mitchell being "disruptive" during a timeout in Tuesday's game against Virginia Tech. The incident led to Mitchell being sent to the locker room by Terps coach Mark Turgeon . Williams said he didn't hear or see what preceeded the timeout. “I was listening to what Mark was telling them at the under 4-minute timeout, and I could hear Charles talking too. You could hear both of them.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
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