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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 14, 2002
Changes to Baltimore's early-disposition court in the Eastside District were announced yesterday at a meeting of the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, aiming to divert minor nuisance cases and allow more time to try serious cases in District Court. The court's purpose is to resolve small cases quickly to unclog the crowded system. Changes include moving all citation cases - including trespassing, consuming alcohol in public and minor shoplifting - to an early-morning docket. There, defendants would be offered a deal in which they would immediately complete five hours' community service in exchange for prosecutors dropping the case.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 19, 2010
Some of my Charles Village neighbors take their breakfasts outdoors at the bus stop. This week, I noted a morning repast of yogurt in a plastic cup and a Pop-Tart extracted from a backpack. No thanks. You just flunked my Baltimore breakfast test. My teachers were my grandmother and her sister, siblings who lived under the same roof until the days they died. Never separated, they also shared a trait. They were morning people happy to be up and busy at the hour when the steam whistles were calling cannery workers to their jobs on Boston Street.
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NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
The chairman of a powerful legislative committee has threatened to halt state funding of Baltimore's "early disposition" court unless the city's top criminal justice officials can show the 15-month-old program is worthy of further investment. "As chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, I have a responsibility to make sure we're not just throwing good money after bad," Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat, said. "If it's not working, either fix it or we're not going to fund it."
HEALTH
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
"A joyful heart is the health of the body, but a depressed spirit dries up the bones." W ho knew that the Old Testament sages who wrote the Book of Proverbs were medical researchers in disguise? It seems that laughter really is the best medicine. n Roughly every day, another study is released trumpeting yet another of the health benefits of happiness: Watching funny movies or listening to enjoyable music is good for our hearts. Those who are chipper and upbeat are less likely to catch colds, even after they're exposed to a virus.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2001
As a corporate lawyer at one of the city's blue-chip law firms, John H. Lewin Jr. never had to deal with the seamy underbelly of the criminal justice system. But two years ago, Lewin volunteered to plunge into the system's problems when a council was created to repair the courts. The system had descended into chaos, and criminal defendants were being set free because their trials were delayed so long. Yesterday, Lewin stepped down as coordinator of the group amid a standing ovation from criminal justice leaders who praised him for his commitment to improving the system.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2002
A House of Delegates committee moved yesterday to eliminate funding for Baltimore's early disposition court, a favorite of Mayor Martin O'Malley's that has been sharply criticized as a failure by the city's top prosecutor. The committee's chairman, Del. Howard P. Rawlings, also proposed cutting off the $34.1 million in additional public school funds due to Prince George's County next year if the General Assembly doesn't pass legislation to restructure the system's embattled school board.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2002
A House of Delegates committee moved yesterday to eliminate funding for Baltimore's early disposition court, a favorite of Mayor Martin O'Malley that has been sharply criticized as a failure by the city's top prosecutor. The committee's chairman, Del. Howard P. Rawlings, also proposed cutting off the $34.1 million in additional public school funds due to Prince George's County next year if the General Assembly doesn't pass legislation to restructure the system's embattled school board.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
The chairman of a powerful legislative committee has threatened to halt state funding of Baltimore's "early disposition" court unless the city's top criminal justice officials can show the 15-month-old program is worthy of further investment. "As chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, I have a responsibility to make sure we're not just throwing good money after bad," Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat, said. "If it's not working, either fix it or we're not going to fund it."
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
Leaders of the city's criminal justice system recommended improvements yesterday to Baltimore's early disposition court, which has been criticized as ineffective and a waste of government dollars. The recommendations, drafted by a panel of 16 lawyers, judges and other criminal justice experts and adopted by the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, include combining part of the 15-month-old court with another, more effective early disposition program called "quality case review." Other suggestions include putting violation of probation cases on the early disposition docket, allowing all of a defendant's cases to be bundled; identifying and assessing defendants with drug addictions; and promoting legislation to decrease the number of minor cases that qualify for jury trials.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
A year after its creation, a court promoted by Mayor Martin O'Malley as a solution to unclogging the city's judicial system is failing, say top judges, prosecutors and public defenders. Baltimore's "early disposition" court was designed to dispose of petty criminal cases within 24 hours of a person's arrest by giving a defendant a plea offer he or she couldn't refuse. In practice, though, defendants are refusing at an alarming rate, secure in the knowledge that the system will likely reward them for their resistance, officials say. For the first time, the city state's attorney's office has compiled data showing that defendants get a better deal if they wait for a Circuit Court trial - statistics that buttress long-standing criticism of the early disposition program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 3, 2008
Robert Michael "Pick" Pickering Sr., a retired Evening Sun makeup editor who enjoyed restoring old homes, died of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Wednesday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 64. Mr. Pickering was born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens. "We grew up in the shadow of Memorial Stadium. It was a great place to grow up. We played handball, stickball, half ball and touch football in the back alleys or the streets," said Mike Ward, a childhood friend who is now a certified public accountant and real estate broker.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN REPORTER | August 29, 2007
McDonogh coach Dom Damico said that senior tackle Lane Clelland "has the perfect body for a lineman: tall, long and strong." And "he has a mean streak," Damico added. "I know what he means by mean streak," said Clelland, who is 6 feet 5 and 270 pounds. "When I'm pass-blocking and I feel someone off balance, I'm like a shark who smells blood. And when I do, I want to drive my man into the ground." Opposing coaches, like Loyola's Brian Abbott, have noticed. "Lane is the best offensive lineman we saw last year, " he said.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2007
Editor's note: Every Tuesday through the end of tax season, The Sun will run an edited transcript of Baltimoresun .com's weekly tax advice column featuring three experts from the Hunt Valley accounting firm SC&H Group. A few years ago we bought a time share. We recently sold it, at a loss, to a company that buys up time shares and that said the loss could be written off. My reading of tax information and a call to the IRS indicate that a time share is personal use property and the loss cannot be taken on taxes.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 28, 2006
There really are only two ways to go with the Miguel Tejada saga. Either the Orioles are in denial about their superstar shortstop, or the rest of us should never again believe our eyes. Tejada is leading the team in batting average, home runs and RBIs, so there's certainly no reason to panic, but the change in his demeanor over the past year has been so obvious that it's difficult to understand why club officials don't think it's anything to worry about. "He's doing what he's supposed to be doing," manager Sam Perlozzo said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | February 11, 2006
Whether you're a first-time homebuyer, an investor, vacation property buyer, historic preservation buff - or even looking for a boat to convert into a live-aboard residence - you are not shopping the market to the max unless you check out the federal government's best real estate resources: The combined property disposition program inventories of 10 agencies, all rolled into one online access point. Want to buy a cabin in the woods near Lake Huron? Center-city rowhouses for rehab from Baltimore to Los Angeles?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2004
Taco Fiesta is so colorfully decorated, the food is so expertly prepared and the service is so sunny and efficient that the restaurant must be part of a chain. But it's not. There's only one Taco Fiesta, and it is owned by Jerry Gutierrez. After 12 years in College Park, he sold that location and, in February, opened in Baltimore. His new space, on Exeter Street within walking distance of the Inner Harbor, is much larger, but the menu is basically the same - the standard tacos, burritos, chips and chimichangas one finds in Mexican restaurants, with a heavier than usual selection of fish and vegetarian items.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy called the mayor's favored court reform program a failure yesterday, and said state legislators should stop funding it. With Mayor Martin O'Malley beside her, Jessamy told the House Appropriations Committee that the $4.7 million early disposition court should be eliminated and the money spent to hire more prosecutors and strengthen existing court reform programs. The hearing was the second time in the past two weeks the mayor and state's attorney appeared together before lawmakers to discuss the court's future.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 14, 2002
Changes to Baltimore's early disposition court in the Eastside District were announced yesterday at a meeting of the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, aiming to divert minor nuisance cases and allow more time to try serious cases in District Court. The purpose of early disposition court is to resolve small cases quickly to unclog the crowded system. Changes include moving all citation cases - including trespassing, consuming alcohol in public and minor shoplifting - to an early-morning docket.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
Until Monday night, the only air of joy that surrounded the Orlando Magic revolved around the March wedding of Croatian guard Gordan Giricek and the pending birth of his first child. But then the Magic came up with another reason to smoke cigars and pop champagne corks: the end of a 19-game losing streak, as Orlando knocked off the Phoenix Suns at home, 105-98. "You know for the first time in a long time, we have a very happy locker room," coach Johnny Davis said. "And for the first time in a long time, I can actually smile for a change.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2003
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. - The protests rang shrill enough to wake the dead. After officials in this upscale Marin County town north of San Francisco approved a downtown mortuary's request to add an on-site crematory, denizens of a popular bakery next door weren't exactly pleased. "Bake Bread, Not Bodies!" fumed one sign at a raucous City Council meeting in May. Another read: "Over My Dead Body." Neighbors winced at the image of a "cadaver incinerator" that would run year-round, 16 hours a day. An Internet Web site created by critics warned of large bodies that could take eight hours to burn, rather than the average 90 minutes.
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