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BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | May 23, 1994
NEW YORK -- Ever since the collapse of high inflation, consumers have known that it no longer pays to go into debt. There's no pressure to buy before prices go up. And your wages might not rise enough to reduce the pressure of high monthly payments. If you're on your company's layoff list, high debt endangers the very security that you've been working toward.But like any other addiction, a debt habit seems difficult to give up.During past recessions, safety-minded consumers have hastened to lower their borrowings.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2008
Marylanders saw a bigger average increase in personal income last year than in 2006, according to new government estimates. Personal income in the state was about $46,000 per person last year, up 2.2 percent from a year earlier, adjusting for the sapping effects of inflation. That measure - a stand-in of sorts for wealth, including not only wages but also such sources of income as interest, dividends and employer contributions to health care and retirement - rose 1.8 percent in 2006. The estimates, which are preliminary, were released yesterday by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick T. Reardon and Patrick T. Reardon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 10, 2005
The first question my wife would ask - well, the first after "Are you crazy?!" - would be about bookcases. The for-sale collection of Penguin Classics, which includes all the books ever published in the 59-year-old series, is amazing on many levels - 1,082 books available through Amazon.com for just $7,989.99 (free shipping). We're talking 19 titles by Charles Dickens, 47 titles by William Shakespeare, five by Cicero, six by Edith Wharton, 16 by Thomas Hardy, one by St. Teresa of Avila, one by Ulysses S. Grant and seven by the Bronte sisters, to say nothing of four versions of The Iliad and three of The Aeneid.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | July 18, 2007
If you think President Bush's abysmal public approval is strictly a function of his mismanagement of the Iraq war, think again: While Mr. Bush's overall approval, depending on the poll, hovers near 30 percent, his approval for handling the economy is not much better. A June national poll by the American Research Group, in fact, pegged Mr. Bush's overall approval at 27 percent and his handling of the economy just 2 points higher, at 29 percent. Given that the war has eaten most of the president's national agenda, is it any surprise that he gets low marks for policies that have nothing to do with Iraq?
BUSINESS
By Kenneth Harney and Kenneth Harney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2002
Do you ever look at the prodigious price tags on houses for sale and ask yourself: Hasn't this gotten out of control? Aren't home real estate costs completely out of sync with families' economic capacities to pay for them? Could the long-anticipated "correction" in home value appreciation after the boom years of the 1990s turn into a meltdown? Good questions, particularly given the pivotal role home equity plays in the net wealth and retirement planning of most owners. But before you gird yourself for the meltdown, consider a couple of perhaps surprising economic facts: Despite the seeming disconnect between spiraling housing prices and an economy just now emerging from recession, homebuyers' incomes actually have kept pace with home prices.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2008
Marylanders saw a bigger average increase in personal income last year than in 2006, according to new government estimates. Personal income in the state was about $46,000 per person last year, up 2.2 percent from a year earlier, adjusting for the sapping effects of inflation. That measure - a stand-in of sorts for wealth, including not only wages but also such sources of income as interest, dividends and employer contributions to health care and retirement - rose 1.8 percent in 2006. The estimates, which are preliminary, were released yesterday by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | September 17, 2000
With the record U.S. economic boom well into its 10th year, evidence continues to show that growth is broad-based, improving the lives of millions of Americans who didn't participate in past periods of prosperity. Indeed, a new study shows that the 1990s and the first part of 2000 have been a particularly prosperous stretch - both nationally and here in Maryland - for the four most prominent minority groups: African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Hispanic-Americans and Native Americans. This newest study, an annual undertaking by the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business, projects that between 1990 and 2001, the aggregate buying power of these four groups nationwide will have doubled (risen about 103 percent)
BUSINESS
By Joseph Mann and Joseph Mann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2003
A new study of the Hispanic market in the United States projects increases in household disposable income and consumer spending through 2020 that significantly outpace the expected national growth rate. The study based its estimates on the continued rapid expansion of the Hispanic population. Titled "Snapshots of the U.S. Hispanic Market," the report, released last week, said Hispanic spending patterns "often show a sharp contrast of growth in an otherwise flat market. It also seeks to highlight the importance of targeting Hispanic consumers to achieve maximum sales gains.
FEATURES
By Elizbeth Large | June 16, 1991
Staff writer Patrick McGuire tells me I'm the person lottery officials are targeting. I've never bought a ticket. I don't know how to play, and I'm embarrassed to admit it to the clerk. Plus I have a moderate amount of disposable income -- at least more than a lot of the people who play the traditionally blue-collar games, Pick 3 and Pick 4."If they can hook you . . . " he says.He brought me some figures from a study by the Heartland Institute. (For more on it, see our cover story.) It's a chart entitled "What Chance Do You Have?"
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
A decade beyond the good old days of retailing, one truth seems to prevail.This isn't the 1980s.As high as consumer confidence soars and as low as interest rates drop, analysts say the days are gone when retailers can expect a steady rise in sales each year. No longer will people stand in line to buy $400 worth of clothing from a men's clothing store on more or less a whim. Even the personal computer isn't so hot anymore."Americans are finally coming to grips with the fact that the high- riding '80s are dead," said Kurt Barnard, president of Barnard's Retail Marketing Report, a forecasting firm in Scotch Plains, N.J. "The year ahead is not going to be very different from the year just passed.
NEWS
By Reid Cramer | August 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It's not often that we look to the dastardly IRS to come to our rescue. But the IRS recently announced the advent of a new tool that just might help avert a growing crisis - the disappearance of savings in the American economy. Beginning next year, taxpayers will be allowed to use direct deposit to divide their tax refunds among several accounts rather than receiving them in a lump sum. This will allow funds to go directly into savings, checking and retirement products. Because the IRS distributes more than $220 billion in refunds each year, and more than three-quarters of the nation's taxpayers receive them, this policy will create an ideal opportunity to connect tax refunds to saving opportunities.
NEWS
By BRUCE WILSON | May 9, 2006
The trial of former Enron executives Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling is the latest reminder that government oversight of unscrupulous executive behavior is unfortunately necessary. But only a relative handful of executives participate in illegal behavior. We should be more concerned with the completely legal pillaging of corporate coffers that thousands of CEOs and other corporate officers engage in daily. Illegally cooking the corporate books is a rarity. Grossly excessive executive compensation is anything but rare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick T. Reardon and Patrick T. Reardon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 10, 2005
The first question my wife would ask - well, the first after "Are you crazy?!" - would be about bookcases. The for-sale collection of Penguin Classics, which includes all the books ever published in the 59-year-old series, is amazing on many levels - 1,082 books available through Amazon.com for just $7,989.99 (free shipping). We're talking 19 titles by Charles Dickens, 47 titles by William Shakespeare, five by Cicero, six by Edith Wharton, 16 by Thomas Hardy, one by St. Teresa of Avila, one by Ulysses S. Grant and seven by the Bronte sisters, to say nothing of four versions of The Iliad and three of The Aeneid.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
With the nation slowly stepping out of a recession and Americans feeling uncertain about their jobs, the issue of work and the economy has moved to the forefront of the presidential race, overshadowed at times only by the war in Iraq. "There's a tremendous sense of insecurity among American workers today," said Charles Craver, a labor law professor at George Washington University Law School. Employment and prosperity are always pivotal issues in presidential elections, from Herbert Hoover's "chicken in every pot" to Ronald Reagan's "Are you better off now than you were four years ago?"
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - Well, this is a new one. I mean, we've all heard about the pot calling the kettle black. Until this week, though, I'd never heard of the pot calling the kettle old. But that's what the just-filed lawsuit against Dick Clark Productions amounts to. You know Mr. Clark, of course. Former host of American Bandstand, producer of countless award shows, blooper shows, New Year's Eve shows. Nicknamed "the world's oldest teen-ager," ha ha ha, because of his ageless good looks. Well, according to the lawsuit, a fellow named Ralph Andrews, a television producer in his own right, went to Mr. Clark in 2001 looking for work.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Mann and Joseph Mann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2003
A new study of the Hispanic market in the United States projects increases in household disposable income and consumer spending through 2020 that significantly outpace the expected national growth rate. The study based its estimates on the continued rapid expansion of the Hispanic population. Titled "Snapshots of the U.S. Hispanic Market," the report, released last week, said Hispanic spending patterns "often show a sharp contrast of growth in an otherwise flat market. It also seeks to highlight the importance of targeting Hispanic consumers to achieve maximum sales gains.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | January 3, 1992
Maryland's chief economic development official yesterday declared the state's economy not half-empty but half-full, and getting fuller all the time."Matched up against what's been happening nationally, the Maryland economy continues to outperform the national economy," Mark L. Wasserman, secretary of the Department of Economic and Employment Development, said in DEED's annual economic state of the state address.In a broad overview of what even he admitted was a bleak year, Mr. Wasserman struck as optimistic a tone as he could in calling for a return of consumer confidence in light of some promising economic indicators.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
PREDICTION: NO one is going to topple Martin O'Malley in the September mayoral primary. So all those lining up to give him $4,000 each at his fund-raiser next month in the Stadium That Should Be Named After John Unitas are doing it to stay on the A List. That's all. They might say they're going to Festivus Martinus for good government, or to ensure that no other candidate challenges O'Malley. But they're just doing what people with disposable income always do to ensure they continue to have disposable income.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
PREDICTION: NO one is going to topple Martin O'Malley in the September mayoral primary. So all those lining up to give him $4,000 each at his fund-raiser next month in the Stadium That Should Be Named After John Unitas are doing it to stay on the A List. That's all. They might say they're going to Festivus Martinus for good government, or to ensure that no other candidate challenges O'Malley. But they're just doing what people with disposable income always do to ensure they continue to have disposable income.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth Harney and Kenneth Harney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2002
Do you ever look at the prodigious price tags on houses for sale and ask yourself: Hasn't this gotten out of control? Aren't home real estate costs completely out of sync with families' economic capacities to pay for them? Could the long-anticipated "correction" in home value appreciation after the boom years of the 1990s turn into a meltdown? Good questions, particularly given the pivotal role home equity plays in the net wealth and retirement planning of most owners. But before you gird yourself for the meltdown, consider a couple of perhaps surprising economic facts: Despite the seeming disconnect between spiraling housing prices and an economy just now emerging from recession, homebuyers' incomes actually have kept pace with home prices.
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