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NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1996
Carmen Whittaker needed to update her computer skills. Pat Sikorski was familiar with keyboarding, but needed to develop HTC computer skills.And both women needed jobs.Ms. Whittaker and Ms. Sikorski were prime candidates for a new course offered by Catonsville Community College's Occupational Training Center. Computer Applications for Business, a noncredit course, provides nine weeks of intensive computer training for displaced workers -- aimed at improving their marketability in the work force.
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NEWS
By Bill Barry | February 7, 2013
In all of the clamor about deficit reduction and fiscal cliffs, the assumption is that the U.S. economy is basically fine. The "jobs slump" is just that - a slump - so with proper government intervention (or lack thereof), the happy days of full employment will return. After all, the "recession" is just temporary, isn't it? There is a more devastating prospect: that the lost jobs are gone forever, leaving tens of millions of Americans, concentrated at opposite ends of the age scale, who may never work "permanently" again.
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NEWS
By TRB | January 20, 1995
Washington -- When Bill Clinton, with the help of Robert Reich, made worker retraining the signature theme of his 1992 campaign, he was reacting to the dim job prospects that low-skill laborers face in America.A quintessential New Democrat proposal, the idea was to let the market operate -- but to soften the blow on redundant workers by preparing them for higher-skill jobs. Yet after Mr. Clinton won, he barely pushed retraining. Like welfare reform, it took the back seat to health care.Until the midterm elections, that is. Last week the president tried to win back his white male constituency by disinterring his retraining theme.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Rejecting an appeal by Naval Academy workers, the Navy is moving forward with plans to privatize the military college's maintenance jobs. The Navy announced this week that it had awarded a contract worth up to $55.4 million over five years to Academy Facility Management, a joint venture of Del-Jen Inc. and Consolidated Engineering Services. The contractor's bid was $5.8 million lower than one submitted under a reorganization plan drafted by academy workers fighting for their jobs. The roughly 225 electricians, plumbers, and other public works employees have until December to find new work or take other federal jobs, possibly in other states.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 14, 1993
Workers for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. whose jobs have been eliminated may draw state unemployment benefits even though they continue to receive wages and benefits from the utility company.That ruling, which will affect hundreds of BG&E workers, was made by the Board of Appeals for the Department of Economic and Employment Development, the three-member panel that decides unemployment payment issues.The decision also could boost BG&E's unemployment taxes since a company's rates are partly determined by its number of layoffs.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
A state board will decide -- perhaps as early as next week -- whether Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employees whose jobs have been eliminated can collect unemployment benefits while they continue to receive wages and benefits from the utility.The Board of Appeals for the Department of Economic and Employment Development (DEED) yesterday heard arguments from both sides about whether these workers are eligible for unemployment payments.Under Maryland law, laid-off workers can collect unemployment benefits while receiving severance payments from a company if their jobs have been abolished, according to Thomas W. Keech, chairman of the board of appeals.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
If Jeremy Rifkin is right, the future of labor is bleak. Automation will displace most industrial workers in the 21st century and only 20 percent of Americans will have job security.In such a scenario, the nation's expanding nonprofit sector can become a refuge for displaced workers and improve their mission of performing community services, said Mr. Rifkin, president of the Foundation on Economic Trends."It's the only arena that can absorb the millions of people who will lose jobs as we move into the post-market era," he told members of the Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations during their annual meeting yesterday at Martin's West in Woodlawn.
NEWS
March 12, 1993
President Clinton chose well when he went to the Westinghouse plant in Linthicum to publicize his program to help defense industries and displaced workers adjust to the post-Cold-War world.The Electronic Systems Group headquartered there has been in the forefront of Pentagon suppliers converting their skills and products to civilian uses. Once almost totally dependent on military contracts, the Westinghouse plant now produces more than a quarter of its goods for civilian use.However, this large Maryland operation also illustrates the huge task that faces the defense industry and the Clinton administration.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | December 6, 1992
New York--If you lose your job in this slow-growth economy, what are your chances of finding a new one at the same pay you had before? Not great, according to biannual surveys of "displaced workers" done by the U.S. Department of Labor.A displaced worker is someone who loses a job for structural reasons -- a plant closing, a corporate downsizing, a reorganization of the workload. As of last January, fewer than half of the 5.6 million workers displaced over the past five years had been able to find a new full-time job. Around 11 percent took part-time work.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Rejecting an appeal by Naval Academy workers, the Navy is moving forward with plans to privatize the military college's maintenance jobs. The Navy announced this week that it had awarded a contract worth up to $55.4 million over five years to Academy Facility Management, a joint venture of Del-Jen Inc. and Consolidated Engineering Services. The contractor's bid was $5.8 million lower than one submitted under a reorganization plan drafted by academy workers fighting for their jobs. The roughly 225 electricians, plumbers, and other public works employees have until December to find new work or take other federal jobs, possibly in other states.
BUSINESS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
The Bush administration announced yesterday that it is giving Maryland a $1.5 million grant to help find jobs for some of the 1,300 Black & Decker Corp. workers who will be displaced when the company's Easton plant closes this year. State and federal officials hope the aid will help buffer the recent economic blows suffered on the Eastern Shore. In addition to the Black & Decker plant closing, Tyson Foods Inc. announced hundreds of job cuts this month. The closings represent the first significant test of the economic development policies of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who has pledged to make Maryland more friendly to business than did his predecessor.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
The shortage of skilled workers in the manufacturing industry means David R. Gischel has two options. He can either accept printing jobs he's not sure his company can handle, or refuse the business. "We turn away jobs, then they might not come back," said Gischel, vice president and co-founder of Victor Graphics Inc. in Southwest Baltimore, which prints material for colleges and universities and is looking to add three or four more workers. "It affects our relationships with our customers."
NEWS
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
OSHKOSH, Wis. -- Life in Oshkosh has its certainties. An ice fishing contest on Lake Winnebago in winter. The annual convention of 900,000 recreational pilots in summer. Strangers asking: "You're from Oshkosh? Isn't that where OshKosh B'Gosh bib overalls are made?""We used to be able to say 'yes,' " said Richard Wollangk, city manager. "Now we won't be able to say that anymore."Beginning in April, for the first time in 102 years, Oshkosh won't make OshKosh B'Gosh. Last week, the company announced plans to close the hometown manufacturing plant, lay off 75 workers and ship production of men's bib overalls out of the country.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
Democrats and Republicans may well agree that job retraining and employment search skills are vital for helping America's downsized work force remain self-supporting.But don't tell that to Azra Burney or John Reischick.The two Baltimore County workers' positions in employment training are slated for elimination July 1 because of a congressional budget agreement that will cut 30 percent of the county's federal job-training money.Nationally, the cuts in job training amount to $277 million, with Maryland losing about $8 million in the 1997 fiscal year that begins July 1 -- roughly 25 percent of the state's share, according to Gary L. Moore, spokesman for the state Office of Employment Services and Training.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1996
Carmen Whittaker needed to update her computer skills. Pat Sikorski was familiar with keyboarding, but needed to develop HTC computer skills.And both women needed jobs.Ms. Whittaker and Ms. Sikorski were prime candidates for a new course offered by Catonsville Community College's Occupational Training Center. Computer Applications for Business, a noncredit course, provides nine weeks of intensive computer training for displaced workers -- aimed at improving their marketability in the work force.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
If Jeremy Rifkin is right, the future of labor is bleak. Automation will displace most industrial workers in the 21st century and only 20 percent of Americans will have job security.In such a scenario, the nation's expanding nonprofit sector can become a refuge for displaced workers and improve their mission of performing community services, said Mr. Rifkin, president of the Foundation on Economic Trends."It's the only arena that can absorb the millions of people who will lose jobs as we move into the post-market era," he told members of the Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations during their annual meeting yesterday at Martin's West in Woodlawn.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
Democrats and Republicans may well agree that job retraining and employment search skills are vital for helping America's downsized work force remain self-supporting.But don't tell that to Azra Burney or John Reischick.The two Baltimore County workers' positions in employment training are slated for elimination July 1 because of a congressional budget agreement that will cut 30 percent of the county's federal job-training money.Nationally, the cuts in job training amount to $277 million, with Maryland losing about $8 million in the 1997 fiscal year that begins July 1 -- roughly 25 percent of the state's share, according to Gary L. Moore, spokesman for the state Office of Employment Services and Training.
BUSINESS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
The Bush administration announced yesterday that it is giving Maryland a $1.5 million grant to help find jobs for some of the 1,300 Black & Decker Corp. workers who will be displaced when the company's Easton plant closes this year. State and federal officials hope the aid will help buffer the recent economic blows suffered on the Eastern Shore. In addition to the Black & Decker plant closing, Tyson Foods Inc. announced hundreds of job cuts this month. The closings represent the first significant test of the economic development policies of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who has pledged to make Maryland more friendly to business than did his predecessor.
NEWS
By TRB | January 20, 1995
Washington -- When Bill Clinton, with the help of Robert Reich, made worker retraining the signature theme of his 1992 campaign, he was reacting to the dim job prospects that low-skill laborers face in America.A quintessential New Democrat proposal, the idea was to let the market operate -- but to soften the blow on redundant workers by preparing them for higher-skill jobs. Yet after Mr. Clinton won, he barely pushed retraining. Like welfare reform, it took the back seat to health care.Until the midterm elections, that is. Last week the president tried to win back his white male constituency by disinterring his retraining theme.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich's boss would have been proud of him.Perched on a stool at the Maryland AFL-CIO's Baltimore headquarters yesterday, surrounded by some two dozen casualties of the state's wrenching workplace realignment, Mr. Reich combined soothing words and a stern message with the same personal touch that Bill Clinton parlayed into the presidency."
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