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NEWS
February 4, 2010
Don't look now, but if the current medical marijuana legislation is passed, a local pot dispensary could end up in your neighborhood ("Md. fights through haze over medical marijuana," Jan. 31). Those supporting the legislation promise to set up tight restrictions on the placement of these dispensaries, but as we have seen with the increased numbers of liquor licenses and methadone clinics, the government has a pretty poor track record in protecting our communities, especially our children.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Critics took aim Tuesday at proposed regulations to create a medical marijuana industry in Maryland as a state commission tasked with writing the rules rushed toward a deadline it might not meet. Physicians, patients, advocates and potential growers said the commission did not collect enough public input before drafting the rules - which they said appear to forbid a medical marijuana dispensary anywhere within Baltimore city limits. Final regulations are due in less than three weeks, but the public hearing in Annapolis Tuesday was the commission's first.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Meredith Cohn and Kelly Brewington and Meredith Cohn,Kelly.brewington@baltsun.com and Meredith.Cohn@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Even as a proposal to legalize medical marijuana emerges in Maryland, a backlash over the burgeoning industry has developed in other states - and is likely to influence legislation here. Last week, the Los Angeles City Council tried to rein in the growth of marijuana dispensaries, limiting the number to 70 and imposing tight restrictions on where and how they can operate. And in Colorado, towns are trying to shutter some of the hundreds of dispensaries that have popped up. But supporters of the Maryland proposal say they have learned from problems in states that approved use of the drug without uniform regulations on the dispensaries providing it. The result, they say: Maryland's measure could be among the most stringent in the nation.
NEWS
February 8, 2010
I fail to understand why Mike Gimbel is so concerned about the potential negative effect of marijuana dispensaries to "our communities, especially our children" ("Md. couldn't control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 5). All evidence from California's experience is to the contrary. WIth a physician prescription, adults have no problem obtaining marijuana from legal dispensaries there. An unintended consequence of the dispensaries is that marijuana drug dealers have been largely put out of business, thereby eliminating sources for teenagers to get marijuana.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
State lawmakers agreed Maryland's medical marijuana program was a flop, but only this weekend reached a tentative compromise on how to invent a medical marijuana industry from scratch. Both chambers passed bills to expand access to the drug, but face a Monday deadline to decide how many growers should be allowed to cultivate it and where patients could go to fill a prescription.  Key lawmakers working to revamp the state's medical marijuana law came to an agreement Friday. Only 15 growers would get licenses in the first year, but the state's medical marijuana commission could decide to allow more under a compromise reached between House sponsors and a Senate medical marijuana work group.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
It is downright disturbing to see that Mike Gimbel, someone who has worked in substance abuse programs, could express such a shockingly callous and ignorant view of medical marijuana dispensaries and drug treatment centers by implying that they would have a negative effect on "our communities, especially our children." ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). As Mr. Gimbel himself should know, such establishments exist in order to provide reprieve and care for afflicted members of our community.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 7, 2014
Marylanders with serious medical conditions that could be alleviated by marijuana would gain access to the drug with a physician's consent under legislation passed by the General Assembly Monday. The House and Senate approved a compromise between their differing versions of the bill just hours before the end of the 2014 General Assembly session Their action sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is expected to sign the bill. The legislation supersedes a medical marijuana bill passed that year that set up a system that never got off the ground.
NEWS
February 5, 2010
Md. couldn't control marijuana dispensaries Don't look now, but if the current medical marijuana legislation is passed, a local pot dispensary could end up in your neighborhood ("Md. fights through haze over medical marijuana," Jan. 31). Those supporting the legislation promise to set up tight restrictions on the placement of these dispensaries, but as we have seen with the increased numbers of liquor licenses and methadone clinics, the government has a pretty poor track record in protecting our communities, especially our children.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 7, 2014
Marylanders with serious medical conditions that could be alleviated by marijuana would gain access to the drug with a physician's consent under legislation passed by the General Assembly Monday. The House and Senate approved a compromise between their differing versions of the bill just hours before the end of the 2014 General Assembly session Their action sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is expected to sign the bill. The legislation supersedes a medical marijuana bill passed that year that set up a system that never got off the ground.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
State lawmakers agreed Maryland's medical marijuana program was a flop, but only this weekend reached a tentative compromise on how to invent a medical marijuana industry from scratch. Both chambers passed bills to expand access to the drug, but face a Monday deadline to decide how many growers should be allowed to cultivate it and where patients could go to fill a prescription.  Key lawmakers working to revamp the state's medical marijuana law came to an agreement Friday. Only 15 growers would get licenses in the first year, but the state's medical marijuana commission could decide to allow more under a compromise reached between House sponsors and a Senate medical marijuana work group.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Nearly 100 medical marijuana dispensaries could be opened across Maryland under a bill approved by a key Senate committee Tuesday. The measure approved 10-1 by the Judicial Proceedings Committee would create a medical marijuana program significantly different than the version approved by the House of Delegates. The House plan calls for 10 licensed pot growers that would also operate all dispensaries. Senators said they worried the House version would create a monopoly of pot growers who could control medical marijuana prices and wield considerable political power.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
A federal judge said Friday he would consider lighter-than-normal sentences for members of a major suburban marijuana smuggling organization - the latest fallout of the drug's legalization in several U.S. states. U.S. District Judge James K. Bredar noted that federal authorities announced this summer they would not pursue criminal cases against dispensaries and others legally handling marijuana in states where the drug has been legalized. Bredar, who called the hearing to discuss the issue, said it might be more appropriate to compare the defendants in the Maryland marijuana case to smugglers of improperly taxed cigarettes rather than treat them as hardened drug traffickers.
NEWS
By Dinah Miller and Annette Hanson | March 7, 2012
Despite the fact that marijuana remains a controlled substance that is illegal in the United States under federal law, 16 states and the District of Columbia have legalized "medical marijuana. " Del. Cheryl Glenn's HB15, the "Maryland Medical Marijuana Act," was introduced and first read on Jan. 11, the first day of this year's General Assembly session. Two more bills calling for legalization of medical marijuana have been introduced since. We would like to make the case that medical marijuana, as currently "prescribed," makes a farce of medicine.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
This letter is in response to The Sun's editorial on medical marijuana ("Go slow," Jan. 3). Recently, a medical marijuana panel commissioned by the Maryland legislature recommended two divergent proposals. One recommends dispensaries allow doctors to recommend marijuana to patients, and the other allows research institutions to test the efficacy of marijuana on human test subjects. The Sun supports the latter view. I find the support of this viewpoint to be quite frankly absurd. Marijuana has been one of the most researched drugs in the 20th century.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
This letter is in response to The Sun's editorial on medical marijuana ("Go slow," Jan. 3). Recently, a medical marijuana panel commissioned by the Maryland legislature recommended two divergent proposals. One recommends dispensaries allow doctors to recommend marijuana to patients, and the other allows research institutions to test the efficacy of marijuana on human test subjects. The Sun supports the latter view. I find the support of this viewpoint to be quite frankly absurd. Marijuana has been one of the most researched drugs in the 20th century.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
Mike Gimbel's letter ignores some rudimentary facts regarding medical marijuana ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). Many polls have recently showed that as many as eight out of every 10 Americans say they want medical marijuana to be legalized and regulated. Unlike Mr. Gimbel, they understand that giving needed treatment to sick people needs to take precedence over the politics and misguided taboos of the past. Fourteen states already have medical marijuana, and the reason that many more have legislation pending is because for some severely ill patients, the treatment works.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
A panel that met Wednesday to explore whether Maryland should modify its marijuana laws may have come up with the most practical proposal yet to allow the medical use of marijuana by people suffering from chronic pain or illness, while discouraging the abuses that have plagued other states' efforts to legalize the drug. The plan, which involves giving schools and hospitals the lead role in administering the drug, appears to offer the best chance yet of passing both legal and medical muster.
NEWS
February 8, 2010
I fail to understand why Mike Gimbel is so concerned about the potential negative effect of marijuana dispensaries to "our communities, especially our children" ("Md. couldn't control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 5). All evidence from California's experience is to the contrary. WIth a physician prescription, adults have no problem obtaining marijuana from legal dispensaries there. An unintended consequence of the dispensaries is that marijuana drug dealers have been largely put out of business, thereby eliminating sources for teenagers to get marijuana.
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