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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 21, 2013
Two Harford County 911 dispatchers recently helped an Abingdon woman and her husband deliver their baby girl over the phone. Aubree Mae Kulaga was born at 7:59 a.m. on Nov. 7 to Emily and Matt Kulaga of the 400 block of Oakton Way, thanks to the help of Christina Abrams and Amanda Dolehanty of the Department of Emergency Services. Matt Kulaga had called 911 to report his wife was in labor and he did not think they could make it to the hospital in time. The call was answered by Abrams, Public Safety Dispatcher III, and Dolehanty, a Probationary Public Safety Dispatcher in training.
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SPORTS
By John Jiloty and Inside Lacrosse | July 18, 2014
The U.S. team pretty quickly threw out any concerns about a letdown game in the semifinals of the Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships on Thursday night in Commerce City, Colo. Team USA, coming off a dominant 18-5 win over the Iroquois Nation on Tuesday night, easily could have looked past an Australia team it beat, 16-7, in pool play. Instead, the United States jumped out to a 7-0, first-quarter lead on the Aussies and never slowed, winning, 22-3, at Dick's Sporting Goods Park to advance to Saturday night's gold-medal game against Canada for the fifth straight time.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,1992, Sun Features Inc | May 11, 1992
Dear Joyce: I recently attended a seminar for airline flight dispatchers. An eight-week training course to produce FAA-licensed aircraft dispatchers is being offered at the cost of $2,200. The school promises to assist in entering this field but there are no guarantees. I am very interested but I don't want to throw away my money. Please, I need advice. -- D.W.Dear D.W.: An aircraft dispatcher is a good job that's hard to get. It's one of the best available to high school graduates. The nation's airlines hire only about 1,500 of them and most hang in until they're old and gray, so the turnover is low. Dispatchers love their jobs, my sources say. The job pays well, offers job security and provides travel benefits.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 22, 2004
NEW YORK - US Airways Group Inc., which filed for bankruptcy protection last week after failing to win concessions from workers, reached agreement yesterday with the Transport Workers Union on a cost-cutting contract for 151 flight dispatchers. The accord will provide savings of $4.5 million to the Arlington, Va.-based airline, including lower wages, said Don Wright, president of the union's Local 545. US Airways is seeking the concessions to help it cut $800 million in labor costs. The agreement, which must be ratified by the employees and approved by U.S. Bankruptcy Court, "was painful but necessary," Wright said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
A computer glitch that hampered Carroll County 911 dispatchers' ability to track ambulances and firetrucks during a four-alarm fire in Manchester last week may strengthen arguments for buying a new computer-assisted dispatch system.Fire and rescue officials have said that the Dec. 5 blaze, which produced fumes that hospitalized 30 firefighters, also has prompted a review of emergency response procedures."We've been in the process of looking for a new CAD [computer-assisted dispatch] system, probably for several months now," said Howard S. "Buddy" Redman, chief of the Bureau of Emergency Services Operations.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
Carroll County officials are exploring the possibility of consolidating emergency dispatchers and using one police channel to make the county's law enforcement agencies more efficient in sending officers and keeping track of them at a crime scene. "I fully support the concept of consolidated police communications. I couldn't fathom fire rescue services having a mix and match," said Scott Campbell, acting administrator of the county's support services for the Office of Public Safety. He said that his office still needs to see how feasible such a plan would be. Campbell said the space limitations of each agency will factor into how quickly consolidation could happen.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
Mark Hemler has a photograph of a 2-year-old Pylesville girl and a letter from her mother framed and hung on a wall of his Havre de Grace home.Hemler helped save the girl's life last August when she stopped breathing during a seizure caused by high fever. Her mother, Mary Jane Dykes, wrote Hemler a letter thanking him for his help rescuing her daughter, Amy.For Hemler, it was all in a day's work.He is one of 20 dispatchers at the county Emergency Communications Center in Hickory. They serve as a lifeline between those who need help and those who provide it.Since the centerbegan using the 911 emergency telephone system in 1984, dispatchers have counseled on delivering babies, instructed callers how to resuscitate heart attack victims and talked the desperate out of committingsuicide.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 29, 2014
A Bel Air Police Department communications officer was honored Tuesday night for her prompt, level-headed actions during a home invasion last month. The Board of Town Commissioners recognized PCO Lynda Eisenhardt during the town meeting, presenting her with an Employee Recognition Certificate. The commissioners also honored Harford Day School student Betsy Oursler as Student of the Month for her numerous academic, extracurricular and community achievements. Employee recognition Commissioner Edward Hopkins and Police Chief Leo Matrangola presented Eisenhardt's award, Hopkins recounting how Eisenhardt received a call on April 7 from a home in English Country Manor in which the caller reported an man had forced his way into her home and was beating her wheelchair-bound husband.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
When you call 911, you want to speak with a dispatcher as soon as possible. But what if, at that moment or in general, you aren't able to speak at all? This past week marked a deadline for phone carriers to be able provide text-to-911 service in areas where dispatchers are ready to receive the messages, according to the FCC. In Maryland, the state wants those capabilities to come online in all jurisdictions at once and is anticipating that it will be ready in four to six months. "It's an aggressive timetable, but it should put Maryland as a statewide leader in the country," said Gordon Deans, executive director of the Emergency Number Systems Board, the state office overseeing the program.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
A 28-year-old man police have described as a "one-man crime spree" told 911 dispatchers before taking his life that he had "killed all these people" and wanted to get his "story" out. Robert Hopkins made the calls in the early morning of Jan. 10 from the offices of a North Baltimore nonprofit, and police released them Thursday as they continued to investigate the scope of the violence he claimed to have carried out. Authorities said Hopkins broke...
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 21, 2013
Two Harford County 911 dispatchers recently helped an Abingdon woman and her husband deliver their baby girl over the phone. Aubree Mae Kulaga was born at 7:59 a.m. on Nov. 7 to Emily and Matt Kulaga of the 400 block of Oakton Way, thanks to the help of Christina Abrams and Amanda Dolehanty of the Department of Emergency Services. Matt Kulaga had called 911 to report his wife was in labor and he did not think they could make it to the hospital in time. The call was answered by Abrams, Public Safety Dispatcher III, and Dolehanty, a Probationary Public Safety Dispatcher in training.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
With courage and determination and more than a little bit of moxie, Adelle Waldman set out to crack the code. For her debut novel, a modern-day comedy of manners called "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P," the Baltimore-raised author decided to explore - and expose - the thinking of the kind of guy that she and her friends used to date. Nate is a rising star on the New York literary scene, fueled by insecurity and arrogance. He's a serial dater who justifies dumping his girlfriend a few days after she'd had an abortion by reassuring himself "that he was not the kind of guy who disappeared after sleeping with a woman - and certainly not after the condom broke.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
An employee at a scaffolding company next to the railroad tracks in Rosedale was one of the first people to see the train leave its tracks after it rammed into a truck last month. "There's just a train wreck in front of us and it's on fire," the man said, in one of more than 40 recorded 911 calls released Friday by Baltimore County police. "There's just like a fire and it's nasty. " "Did the train derail?" the dispatcher asked. "What type of train is it?" The questions would continue in 911 calls from Bel Air to Baltimore City, dozens of them, for nearly an hour.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
A hysterical woman dials 911, trying to get help for a friend who apparently suffered a heart attack."He came to visit, and he had a beer, and he was sitting at the table and talking, and now he's blue," she tells Cynthia Tucker, a Baltimore emergency fire dispatcher, who is asking a series of questions.The caller demands to know when the ambulance will arrive, and Tucker assures her that help is minutes away.What the woman doesn't know is that Tucker's questions are part of a new protocol designed to provide better care.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2001
The moment Samuel Shirtcliff felt his chest throb, the 39-year-old trucker eased his rig off the highway, snatched his cell phone and hit 911. "I think I'm having a heart attack," he told the dispatcher in March. As he began to explain where he was, the line suddenly went silent. By the time rescuers combed 50 miles of tangled Dallas highways to find him, Shirtcliff was slumped in the cab, dead. When 911 operators receive a land-line call, the address pops up on their computer. But with cellular phones, all they get is a blank screen.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Baltimore police reported that a man was shot in the face in Sandtown-Winchester on Saturday night. The shooting was reported about 9 p.m. in the 1800 block of Presbury Street, police said via Twitter. The area is northwest of downtown. The victim was taken to an area hospital, police said. He was described as a black man in his mid-20s. Detectives were notified, police said. No other details were immediately available. sdance@baltsun.com twitter.com/ssdance
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 31, 2013
Going back 25 years, mobile phones, as they were called in those days, were the size of small briefcases, and were prohibitively expensive and impractical for the average person. In those days, police officers communicated mainly by radio dispatch and volunteer firefighters and ambulance crews in Harford County were issued radio pagers which activated whenever a network of transmitters broadcast a signal that emergency help was needed at a particular location. Now, of course, almost everyone has at least one portable phone - we call them cell phones or just "our" phones - and they're small enough to carry just about anywhere.
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