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HEALTH
January 25, 2010
Sometimes the appearance of a birthmark catches a new parent by surprise. Physicians are often quick to offer reassurance that most birthmarks are harmless, and many will shrink or disappear over time. Although that's true, a birthmark can also be the key to early identification of a rare disorder called Sturge-Weber Syndrome. Dr. Anne Comi, director of the Hunter Nelson Sturge-Weber Center at Kennedy Krieger Institute, tells us how to determine when a birthmark might be a sign of something more.
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NEWS
By Patricia Rice Doran | October 9, 2014
The mother's story was one that I have heard many times over the past few months, with some variation in detail. Her child, an A and B student with many friends and outside interests, had awoken one morning and refused to go to school. In the following weeks, he developed elaborate rituals that consumed his time, paralyzing fears that made it difficult to function in school or out of it, and intense and frequent rages. His teachers quickly ran out of ideas and strategies, and the student found himself failing five out of six classes.
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NEWS
By Patricia Rice Doran | October 9, 2014
The mother's story was one that I have heard many times over the past few months, with some variation in detail. Her child, an A and B student with many friends and outside interests, had awoken one morning and refused to go to school. In the following weeks, he developed elaborate rituals that consumed his time, paralyzing fears that made it difficult to function in school or out of it, and intense and frequent rages. His teachers quickly ran out of ideas and strategies, and the student found himself failing five out of six classes.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Most people who kill themselves do so from a place of great pain, hopelessness, self-worthlessness and despair. But suicide is best explained not with reference to the concepts of philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre (as was done in the Sept. 24 commentary, "Explaining the inexplicable: suicide" . That's like trying to explain why people die from malaria by quoting Aristotle. Severe depression is an illness. Everybody should know that. States with the highest rates of people taking their own lives have many characteristics in common, including a shortage of facilities for the treatment of mental disorders; proportionately larger populations of groups most prone to suicide, including Caucasians, Native Americans and men; higher rates of alcohol abuse, unemployment, poverty, geographic and social isolation; widespread gun ownership; and the "cowboy mentality" in which self-reliant individualism is lauded and help-seeking is eschewed, and as a result, psychology, psychiatry and mental health practitioners often are looked upon with suspicion or distain.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 22, 1993
If you accidentally drop an extra smidgen of flour into a bowl of cookie dough, do you throw out the whole batch?When the murder mystery ends without the murder solved, do you howl in anguish or applaud the weirdness?Can you sleep at night if your pencils are not sharpened to a perfect point and aligned from left to right in your desk drawer in ascending order of length?In short, can you handle disorder?Yes, sports fans, these questions do have a place here in the toy department this morning.
NEWS
By James Lilliefors & Marcie Alvarado | June 3, 1991
Ocean City -- JUNE BUG season officially opens today, and Ocean City has a new repellent: tenacity.Police say there won't be an "anything goes" atmosphere in Maryland's premier resort town during Beach Week this year.They claim they won't let it happen.They have plans: increased patrols, a new traffic safety unit, a resumption of last year's no-warnings arrest policy for noise violators and an overall crackdown on what Ocean City folks call "crimes of disorder" -- things like sleeping in strangers' front yards, urinating off balconies and nude wrestling.
BUSINESS
By Michael Burns | February 9, 1991
In a nationally publicized case involving claims of crippling injuries to chicken-plant workers, Perdue Farms Inc. has agreed on a plan to monitor and prevent cases of repetitive motion disorder among employees of its four North Carolina processing facilities.The agreement between Salisbury-based Perdue, the North Carolina job-safety agency and the employees was announced yesterday in Raleigh, N.C., as the company agreed to pay $39,690 in fines levied by the state in 1989 for workplace conditions linked to the debilitating disorder.
NEWS
By New York Times | December 26, 1990
For those who find every wafting chemical of the urbanized, industrialized world to be more than their bodies can bear, the syndrome known as environmental illness or multiple-chemical sensitivity is as real a medical condition as diabetes or thyroid disease.But now researchers assert that some, if not all, symptoms of environmental illness, from fatigue to headaches, confusion to nasal congestion, are probably the results of a mental disorder.In a report being published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Donald W. Black and his colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, said they found that when they evaluated a group of patients in whom environmental illness has been diagnosed the patients were much more likely to meet the criteria of a current or past psychiatric problem than were a group of normal people selected from the community.
NEWS
By Maria Newman and Maria Newman,New York Times News Service | April 30, 2000
In the first study in the country on the incidence of autism among young children, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that there was a striking number of autism cases in Brick Township, N.J., but found no link between the disorder and environmental factors in the town. Agency officials, who traveled to Brick recently to report the findings of their yearlong investigation, also said that, while there were no other studies in the United States with which to compare their results, the overall prevalence of autism in the country might be higher than previously believed.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
Sleep is coming a little easier now for Orioles reliever Doug Johns. He no longer stares at the clock next to his bed, counting the hours lost rather than his blessings for getting another chance to pitch in the major leagues.In the same week that ace Mike Mussina returned to the mound after being troubled by a wart, Johns went on the disabled list May 8 with insomnia. He was losing a battle fought quietly and alone for more than a month, and he needed help.The Orioles are providing it through their employee assistance program, and Johns is encouraged by the results.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens cornerback Jimmy Smith has been assigned an Oct. 7 court date at Towson District Court for his misdemeanor disorderly conduct case, according to Baltimore County police spokesman Shawn Vinson. Smith was charged with failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement officer on July 12 when he was arrested by police and given a citation following an incident at The Greene Turtle in Towson. According to Maryland criminal law code Section 10-201 governing disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct, which includes willfully failing to obey a reasonable and lawful order from a law enforcement officer, those convicted of violating this law are subject to a maximum punishment of 60 days in jail or a fine not exceeding $500, or both penalties.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. McDaniels and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Busy lives, smartphones and poor sleep habits are all contributing to groggy children suffering from the same sleep disorders as adults. But Dr. Laura Sterni, director of the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Sleep Center at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, said treating sleep ailments in children takes a different approach form that used for adults. How common is it for children to suffer from sleep disorders, and what kinds of sleep disorders do children suffer from? Sleep disorders are very common in children.
NEWS
By Janet Simon Schreck | August 21, 2014
While the roles of depression and addiction in Robin William's suicide were the focus of most news stories about his death, perhaps the headlines should have focused on his recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, highlighting the intricate relationships between neurological diseases and mental health conditions. The U.S. health care system is woefully inadequate at addressing the overlap between the body, mind and soul in these patients. The anatomical, physiological and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with neurological disorders - such as stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease - can exacerbate or worsen previously existing mental health conditions including depression and anxiety.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Dr. Peter O. Kwiterovich Jr., an internationally known expert on lipid disorders who was the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Lipid Clinic and was an early advocate for routine cholesterol screening in children, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 74. "We have lost a true giant in the field of cardiovascular disease. He was one of the quiet pioneers at Hopkins," said Dr. George J. Dover, pediatrician-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital and director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
SPORTS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A Cleveland Browns fan who uploaded a video of himself apparently urinating on former Ravens owner Art Modell 's grave last month has been charged with disorderly conduct in a cemetery, Baltimore County police said. Paul S. Serbu, 61, of the first block of Meadowcrest Dr. in Franklin, Ohio, was issued a criminal summons last month ordering him to appear in court to face the misdemeanor charge, which carries a maximum sentence of two years in jail and a $500 fine. He was identified by police Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The towering height that helped 20-year-old Isaiah Austin shoot to the top ranks of the NBA draft this year also was a symptom of the genetic disorder that, less than one month ago, ended his pro career before it began. But the 7-foot-1-inch Baylor University student counts himself lucky - at least it didn't end his life. Austin learned he has Marfan syndrome thanks to a blood test administered during the NBA draft process. Sometimes the diagnosis of the connective tissue disorder - which can cause the aorta, the main vessel that carries blood from the heart, to grow until it bursts - comes too late.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | August 9, 2012
Celebrity psychologist Dr. Drew Pinsky recently admitted on CNN to exercising obsessively to stay slim, a condition not technically a mental disorder, but what some call exercise bulimia. He joked about his condition saying: “a little whiff of a mental health issue never hurt anybody.” Doctors at The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt in Baltimore  found the comment disturbing. They say that calling exercise bulimia a “mild” mental health disorder sends the wrong message to the public.
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch | January 15, 1995
Andrew Mattingly Jackson Jr. whirs his three-wheeled electric cart into a paneled dining room in a nursing home in Silver Spring, hurrying to join a gathering of his relatives.Waiting for him is John Philip Mattingly, a resident of the home. He nudges his right hand against the control stick of his electric wheelchair, spinning to greet Mr. Jackson face to face. One by one, the rest arrive: Anna Mae in her wheelchair; Jay with his cane and plastic ankle braces; Bonnie and then Janet, both with a telltale hesitation in their step.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The anxiety began hours after Laurie Bardon Syphard gave birth to her daughter and grew as the weeks ticked by. Was the baby sleeping enough? Was she malnourished? Dehydrated? Syphard became obsessed with the cleanliness of her daughter's baby bottles, cycling through them in a rigid rotation. She worried that a catastrophe would occur each time they left the house. "I would pack and repack the diaper bag eight times and then never leave," she said. The anxiety was so overwhelming that Syphard sometimes struggled to get out of bed. Syphard, 34, knew that her symptoms were more than the typical jitters of a new parent.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
My esteemed former colleague Elizabeth Large responded on Facebook a couple of weeks ago to a comment about the joy I presumably get for cheerfully turning dreck into art: "T wo things I know. He's not being cheerful. Also his irritation at drek far outweighs any pleasure he gets from editing it. " Just so. I have been reflecting since on the irritability of the copy editor. Acknowledging that it may merely rise from cussedness, a quality either inborn or developed early in life, I nevertheless think that there a good reasons for it.  The first is that copy editors, whatever the appearance of their desks, esteem order, clarity, and consistency in prose.
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