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NEWS
July 2, 1994
Dear Michael D. Eisner:You probably never expected such tumult when your folks at Walt Disney Co. dreamed up a historical theme park for Northern Virginia's Piedmont: Congressmen introducing resolutions denouncing the plan. Sign-toting protesters in Washington mocking you as "the Lyin' King." The Smithsonian Institution (pro) pitted against the National Trust for Historic Preservation (con) over the idea.Hey, even the chairman of a corporate behemoth needs some sympathy now and then. You told editors at the Washington Post you thought you'd be hoisted on the region's shoulders for bringing Disney magic to the Mid-Atlantic.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
ASK ANYONE to free-associate with the terms "environmentalists" and "development," and it's a good bet most would think of "against" or "opposed."It is a simplistic and increasingly outdated assumption. Consider the ways leading environmental groups have handled two competing visions of how to preserve the bay region's heritage and natural resources.First was Disney's America, a giant new theme park, residential and commercial development proposed near Civil War battlefields around Manassas, Va., in the Prince William County countryside.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
ASK ANYONE to free-associate with the terms "environmentalists" and "development," and it's a good bet most would think of "against" or "opposed."It is a simplistic and increasingly outdated assumption. Consider the ways leading environmental groups have handled two competing visions of how to preserve the bay region's heritage and natural resources.First was Disney's America, a giant new theme park, residential and commercial development proposed near Civil War battlefields around Manassas, Va., in the Prince William County countryside.
NEWS
October 15, 1994
If the Walt Disney Co. pursues its historic theme park idea somewhere besides Virginia, Maryland would be ideal for it, based on the criteria the company has already set forth:First, it said, the site must be near the nation's capital. That rules out deep-pockets Pennsylvania, which hoped to land the park if Virginia faltered. Second, it must have access to interstate highways -- another Maryland strength as seen by the Fortune 500 companies placing distribution centers here. Third, the land must be zoned for development.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
It's a sign of how far Baltimore and Washington have to go before they truly are a common market in mind-set:In Northern Virginia, all the talk these days is about the Walt Disney Co.'s plans to build a U.S. history theme park outside Manassas. The billion-dollar project dominated the recent session of Virginia's legislature. Old Dominion's business community is agog over the thousands of jobs the venture will bring. And the topic has drawn in such marquee names as Jacqueline Onassis, Willard Scott and Russell Baker, who belong to an environmental group that is fighting the development sited near lush horse country.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock and Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers John Frece and Greg Tasker contributed to this article | September 30, 1994
Walt Disney Co.'s decision to withdraw its plans to build a history theme park near Haymarket, Va., is the opening Maryland officials have hoped for, but it might not be big enough.The Schaefer administration moved quickly yesterday to fill the void, making a long-shot attempt at interesting Disney officials in relocating their Disney's America theme park in Maryland.The public signals were not encouraging. Disney continued to emphasize its devotion to the Old Dominion, and even an enthusiastic Gov. William Donald Schaefer acknowledged that the difficulties of assembling a parcel of almost five square miles could be insurmountable.
NEWS
November 12, 1993
The stunning announcement this week that the Walt Disney Co. plans to build a $1 billion American history theme park in Northern Virginia can be looked upon by Maryland as the proverbial glass half-empty, half-full.Anything that makes the Baltimore-Washington region a greater tourist draw can't help but spin off business for Maryland. And while some purists may sniff at people trekking to see make-believe Civil War-era villages or faux factory towns made to evoke what Baltimore once was, "Disney's America" will also tempt people to visit the real McCoy, in Antietam, Annapolis and Washington.
NEWS
October 15, 1994
If the Walt Disney Co. pursues its historic theme park idea somewhere besides Virginia, Maryland would be ideal for it, based on the criteria the company has already set forth:First, it said, the site must be near the nation's capital. That rules out deep-pockets Pennsylvania, which hoped to land the park if Virginia faltered. Second, it must have access to interstate highways -- another Maryland strength as seen by the Fortune 500 companies placing distribution centers here. Third, the land must be zoned for development.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | February 7, 1994
A number of America's governors were hailed as courageous policy innovators in the '80s. In the '90s, some of them are acting like corporate toadies.With Gov. Jim Folsom leading the charge, Alabama last year agreed not just to buy a $30 million site near Tuscaloosa for a Mercedes-Benz plant, but to train local workers, teach them German, and then permit Daimler Benz to pay off its entire $300 million plant cost through a 25-year exemption from state income...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock and Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers John Frece and Greg Tasker contributed to this article | September 30, 1994
Walt Disney Co.'s decision to withdraw its plans to build an historical theme park near Haymarket, Va., is the opening Maryland officials have hoped for, but it might not be big enough.The Schaefer administration moved quickly yesterday to fill the void, making a long-shot attempt at interesting Disney officials in relocating their Disney's America theme park in Maryland.The public signals were not encouraging. Disney continued to emphasize its devotion to the Old Dominion, and even an enthusiastic Gov. William Donald Schaefer acknowledged that the difficulties of assembling a parcel of almost five square miles could be insurmountable.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock and Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers John Frece and Greg Tasker contributed to this article | September 30, 1994
Walt Disney Co.'s decision to withdraw its plans to build a history theme park near Haymarket, Va., is the opening Maryland officials have hoped for, but it might not be big enough.The Schaefer administration moved quickly yesterday to fill the void, making a long-shot attempt at interesting Disney officials in relocating their Disney's America theme park in Maryland.The public signals were not encouraging. Disney continued to emphasize its devotion to the Old Dominion, and even an enthusiastic Gov. William Donald Schaefer acknowledged that the difficulties of assembling a parcel of almost five square miles could be insurmountable.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock and Michael Dresser and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers John Frece and Greg Tasker contributed to this article | September 30, 1994
Walt Disney Co.'s decision to withdraw its plans to build an historical theme park near Haymarket, Va., is the opening Maryland officials have hoped for, but it might not be big enough.The Schaefer administration moved quickly yesterday to fill the void, making a long-shot attempt at interesting Disney officials in relocating their Disney's America theme park in Maryland.The public signals were not encouraging. Disney continued to emphasize its devotion to the Old Dominion, and even an enthusiastic Gov. William Donald Schaefer acknowledged that the difficulties of assembling a parcel of almost five square miles could be insurmountable.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | September 10, 1994
When Michael D. Eisner, chairman of Walt Disney Co., needed moral support after months of getting battered over his plan to build an American history theme park in Virginia, who'd he call?Don Schaefer.It was a few weeks before Mr. Eisner had emergency bypass surgery. The governor had written to the Disney executive months earlier, offering Maryland's assistance with the Disney's America project in the event that the company's chosen site didn't pan out in the state next door. Mr. Eisner, in turn, phoned the governor in search of some Washington-area business support to counter the media barrage against his project from environmentalists and several prominent historians.
NEWS
July 2, 1994
Dear Michael D. Eisner:You probably never expected such tumult when your folks at Walt Disney Co. dreamed up a historical theme park for Northern Virginia's Piedmont: Congressmen introducing resolutions denouncing the plan. Sign-toting protesters in Washington mocking you as "the Lyin' King." The Smithsonian Institution (pro) pitted against the National Trust for Historic Preservation (con) over the idea.Hey, even the chairman of a corporate behemoth needs some sympathy now and then. You told editors at the Washington Post you thought you'd be hoisted on the region's shoulders for bringing Disney magic to the Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 19, 1994
HAYMARKET, Va. -- It's been years, maybe about 132 of them, since there's been so much cross-fire in the rolling hills and cornfields of the Northern Virginia countryside.But this is not another battle between the Blue and the Gray. This battle has been raging in hot, Fantasia-like Technicolor, ever since last winter, when the Walt Disney Co whisked the veil off its plans to build its fifth theme park near this quiet town.Josie Gough, a retired nurse, half-jokes that she's afraid her neighbors are liable to pull a gun on her if she admits she likes the idea of Disney coming to town.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | May 25, 1994
MICKEY Mouse didn't make his fame and fortune by mocking all that Americans hold dear. But his adoptive parent, Walt Disney Co., is increasingly finding itself cast as the bad guy as it tries to build a historical theme park, "Disney's America," near hallowed Civil War ground in Virginia.A controversy that began last fall as a standard debate about the perils of development -- Disney's America would radically transform a pastoral county 35 miles west of Washington -- is now escalating into a cultural civil war.It's getting bloody, and far more than a single business enterprise is at stake.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | September 10, 1994
When Michael D. Eisner, chairman of Walt Disney Co., needed moral support after months of getting battered over his plan to build an American history theme park in Virginia, who'd he call?Don Schaefer.It was a few weeks before Mr. Eisner had emergency bypass surgery. The governor had written to the Disney executive months earlier, offering Maryland's assistance with the Disney's America project in the event that the company's chosen site didn't pan out in the state next door. Mr. Eisner, in turn, phoned the governor in search of some Washington-area business support to counter the media barrage against his project from environmentalists and several prominent historians.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | May 25, 1994
MICKEY Mouse didn't make his fame and fortune by mocking all that Americans hold dear. But his adoptive parent, Walt Disney Co., is increasingly finding itself cast as the bad guy as it tries to build a historical theme park, "Disney's America," near hallowed Civil War ground in Virginia.A controversy that began last fall as a standard debate about the perils of development -- Disney's America would radically transform a pastoral county 35 miles west of Washington -- is now escalating into a cultural civil war.It's getting bloody, and far more than a single business enterprise is at stake.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
It's a sign of how far Baltimore and Washington have to go before they truly are a common market in mind-set:In Northern Virginia, all the talk these days is about the Walt Disney Co.'s plans to build a U.S. history theme park outside Manassas. The billion-dollar project dominated the recent session of Virginia's legislature. Old Dominion's business community is agog over the thousands of jobs the venture will bring. And the topic has drawn in such marquee names as Jacqueline Onassis, Willard Scott and Russell Baker, who belong to an environmental group that is fighting the development sited near lush horse country.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | February 7, 1994
A number of America's governors were hailed as courageous policy innovators in the '80s. In the '90s, some of them are acting like corporate toadies.With Gov. Jim Folsom leading the charge, Alabama last year agreed not just to buy a $30 million site near Tuscaloosa for a Mercedes-Benz plant, but to train local workers, teach them German, and then permit Daimler Benz to pay off its entire $300 million plant cost through a 25-year exemption from state income...
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