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NEWS
September 19, 2013
Disasters don't make big headlines when they are averted, but last week's decision by a U.S. district court judge in Pennsylvania upholding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay cleanup plan was a big victory for environmentalists. But more important was what didn't happen: Had the judge ruled otherwise, the future of the nation's largest estuary - and Maryland's most precious natural resource - would have been bleak. The American Farm Bureau had brought suit against the EPA's Chesapeake Bay plan, which sets a total maximum daily load, or TMDL, of pollutants flowing in from the watershed's six states and the District of Columbia.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2013
Of the many words from the Maryland Court of Special Appeals in the matter of Meredith Cross v. Baltimore City Police Department, I like these best: "Costs to be paid by appellant. " That's double-good news for city taxpayers: We're on the hook for neither the back salary of a police officer who married a convicted murderer nor for the costs of bringing an audacious appeal of her firing to court. What we have here is formal affirmation that a woman has a right to marry anyone she wishes, including a gangster, but not a right to be a Baltimore cop. That was pretty much the court's conclusion Tuesday in the Cross case, echoing Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. from late-19th-century Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
State lawmakers are considering changing personnel laws for county health officers, following the messy and public firing of Anne Arundel's health officer earlier this year. "We need to move forward," Del. Joseline Pena-Melnyk told attendees of a meeting in Annapolis Wednesday of a group called the Caucus of African-American Leaders. Pena-Melnyk, a Democrat who represents Prince George's and Anne Arundel, said she'll seek to form a work group in the House of Delegates to review how health officers are hired and fired.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
A lawsuit over the ownership of the Westport waterfront that was dismissed last month by a bankruptcy judge will be re-filed in a different court, an attorney for real estate developer Patrick Turner said Monday. Kenneth B. Frank said the suit against potential investors, alleging they conspired to gain control of a 43-acre waterfront in southwest Baltimore, will soon be filed in federal district court. Frank, who represents Turner, his partner Thomas B. Fore and their Westport-related companies, said Judge Robert A. Gordon determined bankruptcy court was not an appropriate venue for the suit.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
The Prince George's County State's Attorney's Office is dismissing three criminal charges against Maryland running back Wes Brown stemming from a July 3 encounter with police that his attorney labeled an "unconstitutional confrontation. " Maryland, which must now decide whether to lift Brown's suspension, said his status remained unchanged as of Monday evening. The Terps open training camp next week. Brown had been charged with second-degree assault, wiretapping and stealing a cell phone after Baltimore police detectives arrived in College Park to question the rising sophomore about a nonfatal shooting in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Wednesday criticized comments made by U.S. Rep. Andy Harris that citizens should 'get over' the verdict in high-profile George Zimmerman case.  At a news conference at City Hall, Rawlings-Blake called Harris' comments "unbelievably dismissive, callous and out-of-touch" and dared him to say them to the parents of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen killed by Zimmerman.  "Trayvon Martin died because George...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
He commanded Anne Arundel's billion-dollar budget and was considered a possible candidate for governor. But in recent weeks, former County Executive John R. Leopold sat behind the glass panes of a small office at the Anne Arundel County Food and Resource Bank in Crownsville, answering phones, taking notes and performing other duties to fulfill 400 hours of community service - one of the last requirements of his sentence from a conviction for misconduct...
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
A Prince George's County Circuit Court judge dismissed a small portion of Maryland's suit against the Atlantic Coast Conference on Friday and put the rest on hold pending the resolution of a case in North Carolina. Both suits are part of a legal tangle that ensued after Maryland - one of the ACC's original members - announced in November 2012 that it was departing for the Big Ten, effective in July 2014. Friday's decision by Judge John Paul Davey was a victory for the ACC, but not a complete one. Davey accepted the ACC's argument that the two cases should not proceed simultaneously because they were too similar to be treated independently.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
A judge threw out a criminal charge Tuesday against a Crofton man accused last summer of likening himself to a "joker" and threatening to blow up co-workers. The case raised alarm in the wake of a mass shooting in Colorado but ended quietly after prosecutors were unable to connect the allegations to a specific crime. Police seized guns and ammunition from Neil Edwin Prescott's Crofton home after authorities said he called in threats to a Prince George's County business. He was eventually charged with a single count of telephone misuse, which the judge threw out Tuesday.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Lawyers for Morgan State University have asked a judge to dismiss a case filed by a student beaten by Alexander Kinyua, who was later accused in a separate case of killing a family friend and eating his organs. Joshua Ceasar was attacked by Kinyua with a baseball bat wrapped in barbed wire in a dorm room, and he alleged in a lawsuit filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court that Morgan knew Kinyua was a danger. But the university's attorney wrote in a recent filing that Morgan was not responsible for the attack.
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