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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
The pursuit and arrest of a burglary suspect disrupted dismissal at a Pasadena elementary school Thursday. Jason Thomas Donaldson, 27, of Severn, faces several burglary-related charges, police said. After a neighbor spotted him trying to break into a home in the 8400 block of Alvin Road, Donaldson led police on a nearly one-hour chase through the Lake Shore neighborhood and onto the grounds of Lake Shore Elementary. Anne Arundel County police responded shortly after 3 p.m. to a neighbor's report of an attempted burglary.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Attorneys for a Baltimore police officer accused of slitting the throat of a shar-pei in June took the rare step Wednesday of writing an outside-the-court letter directly to Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, asking him to drop the case. The attorneys for Officer Jeffrey Bolger argue the case was filed prematurely amid a storm of public criticism and a pre-investigatory rush to react by police and prosecutors, and that information uncovered since clears Bolger of wrongdoing.
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EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 16, 2012
Edgewood Elementary School students were dismissed at 9:30 a.m. Monday. A Harford County Public Schools spokesperson said there was a power outage in the building. "BGE is currently working underground at Edgewood Elementary School to make repairs," Teri Kranefeld, the school system's director of communications, wrote in an e-mail message Monday afternoon. "Restoration time has not yet been determined. " The school on Cedar Drive has about 440 students. Check back with http://www.exploreharford.com for updates.
NEWS
By Casey Gwinn | September 8, 2014
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and the Baltimore Ravens have been taking a great deal of heat for their lenient treatment of running back Ray Rice for punching his then fiancée (now wife) in February 2014. Now, with the video of the actual assault circulating on the Internet, the heat has intensified, with the Ravens releasing him from the team, even though the facts of the case, already known to the Ravens and the NFL, have not changed. Ray Rice is seen in the video knocking Janay Palmer unconscious in an Atlantic City elevator and then dragging her lifeless body into the hall, where he eventually props her against a wall.
EXPLORE
January 27, 2012
Three cheers for county prosecutors' plans to appeal a judge's dismissal of charges against a woman accused of driving under the influence of alcohol because, the judge ruled, the police had illegal quotas for issuing DUI citations. It was a misguided decision and should be overturned. On Jan. 5, District Court Judge Sue-Ellen Hantman dismissed a case involving an Ellicott City woman who had been stopped for speeding and then found to have a blood-alcohol content more than twice the legal limit.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and other environmental groups have urged a Pennsylvania federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the federal government's plan for reducing pollution fouling the estuary. The lawsuit filed in 2011 by the American Farm Bureau Federation and the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau contends that the Environmental Protection Agency did not have the authority to issue the pollution limits, that the public was not granted sufficient opportunity to review and comment, and that the limits are based upon flawed computer modeling and input data.  Other agricultural and building industry groups later joined the suit.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
Lawyers for Howard County government are seeking dismissal on technical grounds of a $4.8 million lawsuit in which a man claimed a drunken off-duty county officer pointed a gun at him outside an Ellicott City restaurant in April. In a formal answer to the suit filed in late October on behalf of Han S. Yu, senior assistant county solicitor David R. Moore argued that the county government is immune from lawsuits against employees who are doing their "governmental functions," and added that Yu's complaint of emotional distress was faulty because "there is no allegation that any of the defendants acted out of a desire to inflict distress.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
Howard County Board of Education member Allen Dyer requested Tuesday that the state dismiss his fellow members' resolution to oust him. On June 9, the school board passed a resolution by a 5-2 vote requesting that the State Board of Education remove Dyer, citing his repeated filing of lawsuits against the board and accusing him of, among other things, violating confidentiality agreements and bullying board members. Dyer's lawyer, Harold Burns, argued Tuesday that citizens have known for some time Dyer had issues with the board and had filed many lawsuits against it before taking office, "but elected him anyway.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
The U.S. Navy has asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit that seeks removal of the Naval Academy superintendent from a high-profile sexual assault case. The alleged sexual assault victim has agreed not to oppose the motion to dismiss, according to court documents filed Thursday. U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander has already ruled that she doesn't have jurisdiction over the military's justice system in regard to the lawsuit. She made that ruling earlier this month after the alleged victim sought an injunction to have Superintendent Vice Adm. Michael Miller removed while the suit was pending.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | April 25, 2002
ORIOLES vice president for baseball operations Syd Thrift walked onto the field and shook hands. He then went behind the batting cage and mingled with Orioles coaches and Boston Red Sox coaches. He was pleasant, and at times extremely upbeat. There wasn't any nervousness in his voice, and no stress in his face. If Thrift was a man about to be fired, he didn't sound like it yesterday. With Thrift, now in his eighth season in the same capacity with the team, there are always rumors about him getting fired.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The director of Baltimore's Environmental Control Board was fired Friday amid an investigation by the city's inspector general into payroll issues. Attorney Sandra E. Baker, who had worked in city government for 13 years, was dismissed after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake received "notification from the inspector general's office indicating discrepancies between hours billed to the city and actual hours worked," said Rawlings-Blake's spokesman, Kevin Harris. "The inspector general's findings were of a severe enough nature that the mayor decided immediate termination was the most appropriate response.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
A proposed liquefied natural gas facility in Calvert County could put nearby residents at "significant risk" if a fire or explosion occurs, according to a British consulting firm hired by opponents of the project to review its hazards. Ricardo-AEA, commissioned by some nearby residents and the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, concluded that plans to convert the Cove Point import terminal for liquefied natural gas into one processing and exporting large quantities of the volatile fuel pose additional, possibly "intolerable" risks for workers at the site and people living within eight-tenths of a mile of it. "My view is that the project shouldn't be allowed to go forward, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the risks are not 'intolerable,' and that the risks have been reduced to a level which is as low as reasonably practicable," said Mark Broomfield, author of the report.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge ruled this week that she will not enforce her decision to dismiss a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" until an appellate court rules on the case. City officials expressed disappointment with the ruling, which they said could further slow development of the long-stalled project on Baltimore's west side. "It's always frustrating to me when the legal process is protracted and it prevents meaningful development in the city," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
According to his challengers in the Democratic primary, John W. Anderson is woefully unqualified to continue as Baltimore's sheriff. He's mismanaged his agency, they say, allowed thousands of warrants to go unserved and kept an intentionally low profile because he has nothing to show for his 25 years in office. Anderson dismisses the charges as mere politics. "There's no mismanagement here," he says. "We're running a good, sound agency. " Wherever the truth lies, the race for Baltimore's sheriff is shaping up to be one of the most competitive in years.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 5, 2014
President Obama's firing of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, transparently dressed up as a resignation under congressional pressure, seemed somehow out of character for a chief executive known for patience and dislike of wielding the knife. The retired Army general and Vietnam combat veteran had matched Mr. Obama's own style of cautious deliberation in coping with the VA scandal that left thousands of patients waiting interminable months for medical treatment, some even dying while they waited.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
A Baltimore judge dismissed Friday a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" that alleged the city illegally terminated their exclusive rights to build on the property. Baltimore Circuit Judge Pamela J. White threw out the $50 million suit, saying the city properly ended its deal with Lexington Square Partners when its contract for the land expired. "The mayor is happy we can finally move forward with a key development project on the west side," said Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 28, 2000
Former Glenwood Middle School teacher Kristine Lockwood's appeal to the State Board of Education to have her dismissal overturned was denied Tuesday. Lockwood, who was a nontenured English teacher, appealed to the board that the Howard board's decision in April not to renew her contract was retaliatory - based on her complaints about paint testing in her classroom, her political campaign for the school board and her grievances and criticisms of the school system, among other things. But the state board said that a nontenured teacher who has been fired must prove that her dismissal was illegal or unconstitutional, because school boards aren't required to establish cause for a decision not to renew a probationary teacher's contract.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | May 30, 2012
As the heat index crept toward the 90-degree mark Tuesday morning, Baltimore city social studies teacher Ejaz Baluch watched his students at ConneXions School for the Arts begin to fade. By 11 a.m., when the heat index had risen to 93 degrees, the school called the system's headquarters to see if it would be exercising its longstanding policy to dismiss school if the index reached 90 degrees by 11 a.m.  Teachers across the city began to complain from their sweltering classrooms after they hadn't heard from the school system by midafternoon.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A lawsuit filed by Maryland basketball player Dez Wells against Xavier University last year was dismissed Thursday after a financial settlement was reached. The Cincinnati judge said the deal was "satisfactory to both parties. " Peter Ginsberg, Wells' New York-based attorney, declined comment. Wells could not be reached for comment. Wells sued his former school for defamation and violation of his right for a fair hearing after he was expelled from the university after his freshman year.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A federal judge in Washington has dismissed the high-profile discrimination lawsuit of a Gallaudet University official who claimed she was unfairly demoted for signing a petition to put Maryland's same-sex marriage law to referendum. U.S. District Judge James E. Boasberg ruled April 14 that Angela McCaskill, Gallaudet's former chief diversity officer, had failed to show she had been discriminated against under the D.C. Human Right's Act -- whether for her religion, political beliefs or identity as a straight woman -- or that the university had acted negligently.
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