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Disk Space

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BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | May 16, 1994
One of the most frequent complaints I get from people who bought computers two or three years ago is that they're out of disk space.Many of those machines came with 40- or 80-megabyte hard drives, which seemed copious at the time but are now bulging with the bloated programs and data files that software publishers insist that we need. Today's low-end machines typically come with 170- or 200-megabyte drives, but even those can fill up quickly.Although I'm accustomed to rapid changes in technology, this explosion in disk space -- and disk requirements -- still amazes me.The first computer I bought 11 years ago didn't have a disk drive at all. It stored programs and data on a cassette recorder, which had the advantage of being cheap but the disadvantage of being outrageously slow and not at all reliable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Gallo and James Gallo,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
While computers have the ability to bring home users endless entertainment, and fun, anyone who owns one knows that without proper care, computers also offer equal amounts of frustration. That is precisely why people should protect their investment with routine maintenance. In an age of rampant viruses, spyware and browser hijackings, most owners know that they should have a virus program, spyware catcher and firewall. Routine cleaning of the fans, defragmenting the hard drives and making sure you use the "Check Disk" feature from time to time can stave off minor and major problems on a Windows-based PC. Disk defragmenting is an important aspect of helping your computer to run smoothly, according to Microsoft.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | October 26, 1997
NOT LONG ago, I got e-mail from a reader with a tale of woe about a hard disk that filled up while he wasn't paying attention.It happens often enough these days, particularly among users with older computers. It's hard to find a new program that doesn't require 50 megabytes of real estate, and Web browsers can gobble a couple of square miles with copies of Web pages and graphics that they store on your disk so they can be retrieved quickly next time you visit.Adding a second hard disk won't always solve the problem, as my correspondent discovered to his dismay.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | January 22, 2001
There's an old saying about closets - no matter how many you have, you'll inevitably fill them up. For many years the same shibboleth held true for disk drives. Bloated programs, graphics and more recently, digital music and photographs have always threatened to overflow our computers' storage capacity. If you bought a PC in the last year or so, consider yourself lucky. Competition and technology have made storage so cheap that it's hard to find a computer with less than 10 gigabytes of space available, and 20-gig drives are common on all but the cheapest models.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS and PETER H. LEWIS,New York Times News Service | March 30, 1992
The hard disk on my vintage-1987 computer used to be a lot bigger. When it was new, it had an enormous 33 megabytes of open space.Today the same hard disk is cramped and claustrophobic, with a capacity of a measly 33 megabytes. It's funny how things are almost always larger in memory, except memory itself.A few million bytes here, a few million bytes there, and pretty soon you're talking about real storage problems. Transferring files to diskettes for storage is one option.Buying a new, larger-capacity hard disk or removeable cartridge drive is another.
BUSINESS
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 1, 1991
One of the most vital jobs of a computer's operating system -- its basic software -- is storing and retrieving information on disks at the request of programs like word processors or spreadsheets.Unfortunately, neither DOS (the operating system for IBM and compatible personal computers) nor Apple's Macintosh operating system offers data compression, a technique to snip blank areas out of graphics images, cut repeated spaces and characters from text and so on.While some files can be compressed just a bit, others can be reduced to as little as one-tenth their initial size, letting you put more files on a disk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 14, 2000
Before you spend any money on software, you should check the Internet for a free program or Web site that will do the same job. I've believed that for a while, and it gets more sensible every day. What has caught me off guard, though, is that this rule is reaching out toward computer hardware. For example, you may not need as much hard drive space in your computer now that you can get free disk space through the Internet. Just last week, the i-drive.com company (www.idrive.com) announced "infinite" free space on its disk drives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | January 22, 2001
There's an old saying about closets - no matter how many you have, you'll inevitably fill them up. For many years the same shibboleth held true for disk drives. Bloated programs, graphics and more recently, digital music and photographs have always threatened to overflow our computers' storage capacity. If you bought a PC in the last year or so, consider yourself lucky. Competition and technology have made storage so cheap that it's hard to find a computer with less than 10 gigabytes of space available, and 20-gig drives are common on all but the cheapest models.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | November 30, 1992
With Christmas coming up, parents are beginning to loo seriously at educational software for their children, hoping their computers will become something more than $2,000 Nintendo machines.Luckily, there's a bumper crop of Kid Stuff on the market this year -- programs that will entertain your children, encourage their creativity, and maybe even teach them a thing or two.A word of warning, though: Most educational and entertainment programs today require heavy-duty hardware. If you're using an older IBM-compatible or Apple Macintosh, look carefully at the packages to make sure you have enough horsepower, memory and hard disk space to accommodate them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Gallo and James Gallo,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2004
While computers have the ability to bring home users endless entertainment, and fun, anyone who owns one knows that without proper care, computers also offer equal amounts of frustration. That is precisely why people should protect their investment with routine maintenance. In an age of rampant viruses, spyware and browser hijackings, most owners know that they should have a virus program, spyware catcher and firewall. Routine cleaning of the fans, defragmenting the hard drives and making sure you use the "Check Disk" feature from time to time can stave off minor and major problems on a Windows-based PC. Disk defragmenting is an important aspect of helping your computer to run smoothly, according to Microsoft.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 19, 2000
Over the last year I've waxed poetic about online photo-sharing sites, which allow you to post digital snapshots in Web albums that your family and friends can view and download. The only problem with this approach is that not everyone in your family may have a Web connection, or at least one that's fast enough to make downloading large digital images worthwhile. And once they download photos, many people don't know what to do with them. That's why I was intrigued and ultimately delighted by FlipAlbum CD Maker from E-Book Systems (www.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 14, 2000
Before you spend any money on software, you should check the Internet for a free program or Web site that will do the same job. I've believed that for a while, and it gets more sensible every day. What has caught me off guard, though, is that this rule is reaching out toward computer hardware. For example, you may not need as much hard drive space in your computer now that you can get free disk space through the Internet. Just last week, the i-drive.com company (www.idrive.com) announced "infinite" free space on its disk drives.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | March 8, 1998
WHEN MY WIFE and I moved into our first house 22 years ago, I couldn't imagine how we'd ever fill up all the closets. When we moved to a bigger home, 10 years and two kids later, we had to build new closets to hold the stuff that was overflowing from the old ones.People who bought their computers a couple of years ago are starting to have the same experience.That's because disk drives are like closets. No matter how big they seem when you buy them, you'll manage to fill them up soon enough.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | October 26, 1997
NOT LONG ago, I got e-mail from a reader with a tale of woe about a hard disk that filled up while he wasn't paying attention.It happens often enough these days, particularly among users with older computers. It's hard to find a new program that doesn't require 50 megabytes of real estate, and Web browsers can gobble a couple of square miles with copies of Web pages and graphics that they store on your disk so they can be retrieved quickly next time you visit.Adding a second hard disk won't always solve the problem, as my correspondent discovered to his dismay.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | May 16, 1994
One of the most frequent complaints I get from people who bought computers two or three years ago is that they're out of disk space.Many of those machines came with 40- or 80-megabyte hard drives, which seemed copious at the time but are now bulging with the bloated programs and data files that software publishers insist that we need. Today's low-end machines typically come with 170- or 200-megabyte drives, but even those can fill up quickly.Although I'm accustomed to rapid changes in technology, this explosion in disk space -- and disk requirements -- still amazes me.The first computer I bought 11 years ago didn't have a disk drive at all. It stored programs and data on a cassette recorder, which had the advantage of being cheap but the disadvantage of being outrageously slow and not at all reliable.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | November 30, 1992
With Christmas coming up, parents are beginning to loo seriously at educational software for their children, hoping their computers will become something more than $2,000 Nintendo machines.Luckily, there's a bumper crop of Kid Stuff on the market this year -- programs that will entertain your children, encourage their creativity, and maybe even teach them a thing or two.A word of warning, though: Most educational and entertainment programs today require heavy-duty hardware. If you're using an older IBM-compatible or Apple Macintosh, look carefully at the packages to make sure you have enough horsepower, memory and hard disk space to accommodate them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 19, 2000
Over the last year I've waxed poetic about online photo-sharing sites, which allow you to post digital snapshots in Web albums that your family and friends can view and download. The only problem with this approach is that not everyone in your family may have a Web connection, or at least one that's fast enough to make downloading large digital images worthwhile. And once they download photos, many people don't know what to do with them. That's why I was intrigued and ultimately delighted by FlipAlbum CD Maker from E-Book Systems (www.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | March 8, 1998
WHEN MY WIFE and I moved into our first house 22 years ago, I couldn't imagine how we'd ever fill up all the closets. When we moved to a bigger home, 10 years and two kids later, we had to build new closets to hold the stuff that was overflowing from the old ones.People who bought their computers a couple of years ago are starting to have the same experience.That's because disk drives are like closets. No matter how big they seem when you buy them, you'll manage to fill them up soon enough.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS and PETER H. LEWIS,New York Times News Service | March 30, 1992
The hard disk on my vintage-1987 computer used to be a lot bigger. When it was new, it had an enormous 33 megabytes of open space.Today the same hard disk is cramped and claustrophobic, with a capacity of a measly 33 megabytes. It's funny how things are almost always larger in memory, except memory itself.A few million bytes here, a few million bytes there, and pretty soon you're talking about real storage problems. Transferring files to diskettes for storage is one option.Buying a new, larger-capacity hard disk or removeable cartridge drive is another.
BUSINESS
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 1, 1991
One of the most vital jobs of a computer's operating system -- its basic software -- is storing and retrieving information on disks at the request of programs like word processors or spreadsheets.Unfortunately, neither DOS (the operating system for IBM and compatible personal computers) nor Apple's Macintosh operating system offers data compression, a technique to snip blank areas out of graphics images, cut repeated spaces and characters from text and so on.While some files can be compressed just a bit, others can be reduced to as little as one-tenth their initial size, letting you put more files on a disk.
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