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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Orioles left fielder Nolan Reimold has a bulging disk in his back - which the team believes may have been what has caused the spasms in his neck and tingling and numbness in his fingers. Manager Buck Showalter said Reimold has been treated in Baltimore with a Medrol Dosepak that is designed to alleviate inflammation. If all works as hoped, Reimold could join the team for the series against the Boston Red Sox that begins Friday, Showalter said. “We're going to try a Medrol Dosepak to see if we can get the swelling to go down.
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SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
NEW YORK - The Orioles suddenly find themselves with a logjam at second base after they reactivated Robert Andino from the disabled list on Tuesday. Andino, the starter for most of the season, now will compete with Omar Quintanilla for time at the position. And that leaves Ryan Flaherty in limbo. Quintanilla, who got the start at second base Tuesday, has been red hot since joining the club in Andino's absence. In his first 10 games with the Orioles, he batted .429, and he delivered a two-run single with two outs in Tuesday's second inning.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Orioles left fielder Nolan Reimold will be sidelined for at least two more games with a bulging disk in his back, but the club is hopeful that the diagnosis explains the health problems the 28-year-old has been experiencing this season. Including Tuesday night, Reimold has missed six of the club's past 12 games, including four consecutive April 21-25, because of severe neck spasms. Although he was dealing with lingering neck discomfort, Reimold had started the Orioles' past five games, but after getting to the team hotel after Monday's contest, Reimold experienced tingling in his hands and contacted head athletic trainer Richie Bancells . Reimold "had some tingling and numbness in his fingers, which is common with a bulging disk," manager Buck Showalter said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Orioles outfielder Nolan Reimold underwent successful surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital Monday morning to remove a herniated disk that was placing pressure on a nerve in his neck, the team announced.  The procedure, called a discectomy , was performed locally by neurosurgeon Dr. Ziya Gokaslan, a nationally renowned spine specialist. Reimold said Friday the surgery was similar to the one Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning had last year. Doctors hope the surgery can alleviate the tingling Reimold felt in his left arm, which caused him to be out of action since April 30. Reimold previously received two epidural injections, which calmed the swelling in the disk and gradually took away the pain, but there were still recurrent spots of tingling in his arm and he had trouble regaining strength in it. Reimold now is resting comforably, the team said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2001
I put a 3-inch floppy disk into my IBM, and when I pressed the button to get it out, the metal door on the disk stayed in the computer. I don't know how to go about getting it back out. Should I take the cabinet apart, or is there an easier way? If you look closely at the front of the drive you will find a tiny hole just below the slot where the disk goes in. If you straighten a paper clip and push the wire into that hole, it will trip the eject spring and free your floppy. Hopefully the problem was caused by that errant disk and the drive will work with others.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ and MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ,(Michael J. Himowitz is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun.) | September 14, 1992
Adding a disk drive, tape backup unit or network adapter card to your PC can be a daunting job, particularly if you don't like the idea of taking your computer apart.Even if you don't mind fooling with the hardware, you may be stymied if you have a small-footprint machine without an extra drive bay, or if you don't have an extra expansion slot for the controller board.Fortunately, manufacturers have come up with simple alternatives -- external devices that connect to your printer's parallel port, the same port the printer uses.
BUSINESS
By Ron Wolf and Ron Wolf,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 28, 1991
Most of the hard-disk drives that end up in the shop for repair are there because computer owners are not given enough information about caring properly for their equipment, says Steve Burgess, who spends much of his time battling such ignorance.Manufacturers of computers and disk drives have a vested interest in presenting their products as easy to use, explained Mr. Burgess, president of Mipro III in Redwood City, Calif. "They don't necessarily see it as their job to tell customers what the dangers are. The marketing division stresses the benefits and the ease of use: Just put it on your desk, and it makes itself work."
BUSINESS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Journal of Commerce | September 16, 1991
SINGAPORE -- The U.S.-dominated computer disk drive industry is experiencing memory loss as reduced growth and industry consolidation have hit hard over the past few months.Although U.S. companies have held a strong grip on the disk drive market, several companies fear increased competition from Japanese companies waiting in the wings.Japan's huge capital reserves, the structure of its computer industry and market downturns all work to Japan's advantage and could leave weaker U.S. players on the rocks, U.S. officials maintain.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
Orioles pitcher Scott Kamieniecki had surgery yesterday morning to remove a herniated cervical disk in his neck and part of the sixth vertebra in his spine. The 90-minute procedure was done by Dr. Henry Bohlman at University Hospital of Cleveland.Once the disk was removed, Bohlman took a bone graft from Kamieniecki's left pelvic area and tapped it into the vertebra.Kamieniecki, who went on the disabled list for a third time Aug. 22, could return to his home in Flint, Mich., as early as today.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | November 19, 1993
The Orioles breathed an organizational sigh of relief yesterday when test results indicated that top outfield prospect Jeffrey Hammonds has made a strong recovery from the neck injury that hindered him throughout the 1993 season.Hammonds suffered a herniated cervicalo disk early in the season and was hampered for months by radiating pain in his shoulder and back. Club officials feared that surgery might be necessary to correct the problem, but a magnetic resonance imaging performed earlier this week showed that the disk had returned to its normal shape.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Orioles left fielder Nolan Reimold will have surgery to remove a bulging disk in his neck and have his spine fused Monday morning. And although he holds out hope he could return by the end of the season, Reimold likely will be out for the rest of the year. "I think it is possible, if everything works out, that's a possible, best-case scenario," Reimold said of returning in 2012. "I am resigned to the fact I need to get the surgery and I need to do my rehab until I feel like I am able to play at this level again.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Nolan Reimold met with doctors again Tuesday afternoon to discuss his options on alleviating his neck and back problems. But nothing was determined by early Tuesday evening. One possibility, manager Buck Showalter conceded Tuesday, would be surgery, which would surely end the left fielder's season. “I don't want to throw dirt over Nolan right now. Let's let this thing run its course. I've gotten some positives, some best-case scenario ideas, too. I don't think we're ready to go there yet,” Showalter said.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | June 18, 2012
Orioles outfielder Nolan Reimold is seeing a second cervical specialist today in Baltimore for another opinion on his neck problems - a suggestion made by the first specialist, Dr. Lee Riley, whom Reimold saw in the last few days. Regardless of those findings, Orioles manager Buck Showalter said Reimold, who is eligible to come off the 60-day disabled list on June 30, will not be back before the All-Star Break. The manager didn't want to say more until he had the diagnosis from the second specialist, which could come tonight.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
The Orioles received good and bad news on the ever-puzzling health of left fielder Nolan Reimold, who has been out of all baseball activites for nearly seven weeks with a bulging disk in his neck. An MRI showed that the disk has shrunen and the inflammation is gone - the good news - but the club now has no reason why Reimold is still experiencing spots of tingling in his left arm and hasn't been able to regain his strength. So Reimold - who has spent his DL time in and out of doctors offices - will now see a neurosurgeon to see if his problems are nerve-related.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Left fielder Nolan Reimold, who has been out since April 30 with a bulging disk in his neck, met with specialist Dr. Lee Riley again Monday and a second epidural shot has been scheduled for later this week, Reimold said. He had the first one on May 11 and did not experience any significant progress. The shots are often given in three segments and he said he is “leaning toward just getting it and taking my chances” with the second injection. “It didn't work the first time.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
An estimated 3.5 million cancer patients around the globe are in severe pain from their disease, but many get no relief. In poor countries the cost is considered too high for drugs like morphine when such opioids are often stolen, abused or not taken according to instruction. But some Johns Hopkins University scientists have been working on a solution for those patients, as well as some in the United States, that uses a flexible button-sized disk implanted under the skin that releases consistent doses of painkiller over a month.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 1997
IBM plans to announce today that it has broken the magnetic disk-drive storage barrier of 10 billion bits of data per square inch. The company said the new technology would first appear in products in 2001.IBM passed the 1 billion bit level in April 1996. Like that advance, the new technology will first be used in 2.5-inch, nonremovable disk drives intended for use in portable computers. At this size, a single-platter disk drive will be able to hold 6.5 gigabytes of data, enabling very slim laptop computers to have vast storage capacity.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | February 23, 2010
When Brian Roberts first heard the words "herniated disk," he acknowledged that he was frightened. But the two-time All Star second baseman and the Orioles have had their concerns eased and Roberts is not expected to miss extended time. Roberts reported to spring training camp Monday and conceded that he was diagnosed with a small herniated disk in his back about a month ago. However, the injury will not require surgery and is not expected to have lingering effects besides Roberts' taking it slow early in spring training.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Those of us on the Orioles beat like to joke that no matter what place the team is in, it is always making news. Right now, the Orioles are playing well, and the news continues. Tuesday was a particularly newsy day. Here are some of the things that happened, and my take on each.     Nolan Reimold returns to Baltimore and is diagnosed with a bulging disk in his back First, we'll start with the good news. Now Reimold and the Orioles have an explanation for why he was having neck spasms and finger numbness.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Orioles left fielder Nolan Reimold will be sidelined for at least two more games with a bulging disk in his back, but the club is hopeful that the diagnosis explains the health problems the 28-year-old has been experiencing this season. Including Tuesday night, Reimold has missed six of the club's past 12 games, including four consecutive April 21-25, because of severe neck spasms. Although he was dealing with lingering neck discomfort, Reimold had started the Orioles' past five games, but after getting to the team hotel after Monday's contest, Reimold experienced tingling in his hands and contacted head athletic trainer Richie Bancells . Reimold "had some tingling and numbness in his fingers, which is common with a bulging disk," manager Buck Showalter said.
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