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NEWS
May 31, 2014
The U. S. Preventive Services Task Force, made up of 16 medical experts appointed by the federal government's Department of Health and Human Services, has recently recommended that former and current smokers, ages 55 to 80, receive annual CT scans to test for lung cancer. If the recommendation is put into effect, insurers, as a result of Obamacare, would be required to cover the procedure for around 10 million Americans who would qualify. To be sure, the requirement, as compared with chest rays and illustrated by a study by the National Cancer Institute, could result in a 20 percent decrease in deaths from smoking.
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HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Two cases of Legionnaires' disease have been confirmed at a senior housing complex in East Baltimore, city health officials said Friday. A pair of residents at the 149-unit Apostolic Towers Apartments at 201 N. Washington St. tested positive for the bacteria that cause Legionnaires', city health officials said. One case occurred in March and the other this week; the residents were hospitalized. One person remains in the hospital with pneumonia. Health officials said two cases are considered a "cluster," leading them to test the water system in the building and warn residents not to shower or use the tap. Bottled water has been provided for drinking and cooking.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 8, 2014
The Harford County Health Department and a local advocacy group are warning residents their spring and summer outdoor activities could put them at risk for Lyme disease, the most common vector borne disease in the United States. A bacterial disease, the most common way of contracting Lyme is from tick bites, such as the blacklegged tick, notes the health department, which says the Centers for Disease Control believes there are upward of 300,000 cases of the disease annually. During its meeting Tuesday night, the Harford County Council proclaimed May to be Lyme Disease Awareness Month in the county.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
In his letter to the editor in response to Alliance for Aging Research's CEO Sue Peschin's commentary, "Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift" (April 14), Dr. Andy Lazris of Columbia contends that since there are no effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease there should be no testing ( "Screening for Alzheimer's carries its own risks," April 17). We could not disagree more. There is much both an individual and family can do if they get the devastating news of an Alzheimer's diagnosis.
NEWS
By Cory Booker | April 23, 2014
This year, approximately 60,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson's, joining the 1 million people already living with the disease in the United States and the 4 million to 6 million diagnosed with it worldwide. Their painful struggle is one that I know all too well. I remember when my dad first had symptoms of Parkinson's, a motor system disorder that results from the loss of certain brain cells. For him, it started with a persistent numbness in his arm and hand that led to a decades-long battle with the ever-increasing symptoms that eventually took his life in 2013.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
I am responding to the letter from Dr. Andy Lazris entitled "Screening for Alzheimer's carries its own risks," (April 17). The Alzheimer's Association supports efforts that increase early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by trained professionals in a medical setting after a comprehensive evaluation. Today more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease. With an aging baby boomer population, that number is expected to soar to as many as 16 million by mid-century.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
I write in response to Susan Peschin's recent commentary on Alzheimer's disease ("Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). Ms. Peschin contends that we are not doing enough to screen for Alzheimer's Disease, and she faults the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel charged with developing guidelines for primary care clinicians, for not recommending widespread dementia testing. As a geriatric physician who has been caring for dementia patients for more than 20 years, I have found several problems with screening.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
When a plant is listed as invasive, how far does it spread? How far apart should I plant bamboo for a privacy screen? How far? "Invasive" doesn't mean garden-variety nuisance — it means a foreign invader spreading aggressively until it has destroyed environment, economy, even human health. Sometimes, it is unstoppable. April is Invasive Plant, Pest and Disease Awareness Month, a time to consider what we lose when invasive species get in the United States. For example, Emerald ash borer has killed tens of millions of ash trees and is now in Maryland.
NEWS
By Susan Peschin | April 14, 2014
This is getting old. Every time our nation has an opportunity to do something positive in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, we come up short. The latest example is the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the independent panel charged with developing guidelines on preventive care services for primary care clinicians and health systems. The task force came to the conclusion that there is not enough evidence to warrant population screening for cognitive impairment in older adults in America.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | April 9, 2014
Michael Hirschbeck, the 27-year-old son of major league baseball umpire John Hirschbeck, died Tuesday, WFMJ in Youngstown, Ohio, reported. Michael Hirschbeck had adrenoleukodystrophy, an inherited condition that affects the nervous system. John Hirschbeck's oldest son, John, was 8 years old when he died in 1993 of the rare degenerative disease. The Poland, Ohio, family's struggle with ALD was told in a series of 1996 articles in The Sun that won a Pulitzer Prize. Lisa Pollak's story, "The Umpire's Sons," recounted a family tragedy that had become a footnote in the feverish media coverage after Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar spat on Hirschbeck after a controversial call in 1996.
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