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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Dr. Thomas Russell Hendrix, a leader in the fields of gastric and liver disease, died of complications from heart surgery Dec. 23 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 93 and lived in Roland Park before moving to Chestertown. Dr. Hendrix, who pioneered studies in gluten intolerance, swallowing disorders and diarrheal disease, led his department at Hopkins for 31 years. "He had patients from all over the world," said his son, Paul Hendrix, also of Chestertown. "He was the gastroenterologist of last resort.
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HEALTH
By Sarah Hainesworth, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
When his private dentist passed away, Henry Yeakel quickly searched for a new dental home. While some might have thumbed through a phone book to find the closest provider, Yeakel didn't have that luxury. He needed a dentist who could cater to his unique dental needs. "My teeth were brittle and breaking and falling apart," said Yeakel, who was diagnosed with AIDS in 1997. "I guess all the medication I was on probably destroyed my teeth. " It used to take Yeakel more than 30 minutes to complete his daily regimen of medication, which consisted of 32 pills twice a day. Yeakel's search for a new dentist led him to the Plus clinic at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
When Charlie Schneider came back one day in June after being out fishing near his Tilghman Island home, he noticed he was getting chills. His left ankle itched and got worse and worse through the evening. It eventually started to throb a bit, and he couldn't sleep. At 2 a.m., he asked his wife to get an ice pack before discovering that his ankle had swollen to twice its normal size. He didn't know what had caused the reaction, but his decision to go straight to the hospital ultimately helped save his legs - and his life.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Catonsville will host an afternoon of high school basketball along with Seton Keough and Mount St. Joseph on Dec. 21 to benefit The Kropfelder Foundation for Melanoma Education and Research. Comets girls basketball coach Mike Mohler had been friends since high school with David Kropfelder, who died of melanoma in 2003. Kropfelder was a three-sport athlete at Mount St. Joseph and is in the Gaels Hall of Fame. He was a standout in soccer, basketball and baseball, Mohler said. “David was two years ahead of me at Mt. St. Joe,” Mohler said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
A small service and a moment of silence under a glowing-red Washington Monument commemorated World AIDS Day in Mount Vernon Sunday evening. The Rev. Joseph Muth of St. Matthew Catholic Church on Loch Raven Boulevard told the roughly two dozen gathered in Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church before the monument lighting that the city's goal is to "get to zero. " "When we were in school, zero was a failure," Muth said. "Now we're in a different school. " He looks forward, he said, to the day when the city can report "zero new infected, zero deaths and zero discrimination of those who are infected" with HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
By Roslyn M. Brock and Regina Benjamin and By Roslyn M. Brock and Regina Benjamin | December 1, 2013
The havoc that HIV can wreak on a family and a community can be devastating. Over the past three decades, we have watched helplessly as friends and family members died from HIV-related illnesses. Each one lived life brimming with hope and energy, prepared to make tremendous contributions to society. Instead each was laid to rest. Their lives were taken by a preventable disease. While no amount of advocacy can bring back the lives stolen by this epidemic, we have the power to change the tide of HIV in black America and eliminate the impact of this preventable disease in communities across the country.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | November 19, 2013
Just as Sean Hull's career and personal goals were jelling, his mother was suddenly hospitalized. Two days later, she was gone. An insidious disease called sarcoidosis -- which is still being studied after decades of research -- took Hull's mother's life, and the Ellicott City resident still has questions about what causes the mysterious illness. In her memory, Hull established the Life and Breath Foundation in 1998, just two years after her passing. He was 31 at the time. Ida E. Hull was only 59 when she lost her fight against an illness that no one, including her, knew she had. Though she had silently struggled for 13 years with the inflammatory disease, which causes lesions called granulomas to form on internal organs, family members only learned what had killed her from an autopsy.
NEWS
By Kaye Wise Whitehead | November 6, 2013
I hate losing. I hate it when I lose my keys, lose my way, or lose my train of thought. I have spent my life trying to learn the rules of every game that I played in an effort to ensure that I was always prepared and that I had everything that I needed to be victorious. The game always made sense to me when I knew the rules. I respected the boundaries and I fought hard. I am not accustomed to or comfortable with losing, and that is why I am having a difficult time. Earlier this year, my dear sweet mother-in-law passed away, less than three months after being diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer that had metastasized from her lungs to two places in her brain.
NEWS
October 30, 2013
Officials at the World Health Organization warned this week that a recent outbreak of polio among children in Syria potentially could threaten the entire region unless urgent steps are taken to halt its spread. The United Nations reported that the two-and-a half-year Syrian civil war has devastated the country's health-care system, disrupted vaccination programs and left millions of families living in squalid refugee camps whose unsanitary conditions make them ideal breeding grounds for diseases like polio.
NEWS
By Dan Morhaim, Catherine Pugh and Enzo J. Leone | October 29, 2013
Most Marylanders are not aware of the shortage of one type medical specialists that will affect health care availability for decades: Podiatrists. Podiatry is the medical specialty that deals with foot and ankle injuries and disease. Don't laugh. This is serious business. With the aging of our population and the explosion in diabetes, we're likely to see more diabetic foot conditions. Left untreated or undertreated, this disease can progress to chronic infections and lower limb amputations, resulting in disabling and life-changing consequences.
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