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NEWS
April 17, 2014
I write in response to Susan Peschin's recent commentary on Alzheimer's disease ("Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). Ms. Peschin contends that we are not doing enough to screen for Alzheimer's Disease, and she faults the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel charged with developing guidelines for primary care clinicians, for not recommending widespread dementia testing. As a geriatric physician who has been caring for dementia patients for more than 20 years, I have found several problems with screening.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
When a plant is listed as invasive, how far does it spread? How far apart should I plant bamboo for a privacy screen? How far? "Invasive" doesn't mean garden-variety nuisance — it means a foreign invader spreading aggressively until it has destroyed environment, economy, even human health. Sometimes, it is unstoppable. April is Invasive Plant, Pest and Disease Awareness Month, a time to consider what we lose when invasive species get in the United States. For example, Emerald ash borer has killed tens of millions of ash trees and is now in Maryland.
NEWS
By Susan Peschin | April 14, 2014
This is getting old. Every time our nation has an opportunity to do something positive in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, we come up short. The latest example is the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the independent panel charged with developing guidelines on preventive care services for primary care clinicians and health systems. The task force came to the conclusion that there is not enough evidence to warrant population screening for cognitive impairment in older adults in America.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | April 9, 2014
Michael Hirschbeck, the 27-year-old son of major league baseball umpire John Hirschbeck, died Tuesday, WFMJ in Youngstown, Ohio, reported. Michael Hirschbeck had adrenoleukodystrophy, an inherited condition that affects the nervous system. John Hirschbeck's oldest son, John, was 8 years old when he died in 1993 of the rare degenerative disease. The Poland, Ohio, family's struggle with ALD was told in a series of 1996 articles in The Sun that won a Pulitzer Prize. Lisa Pollak's story, "The Umpire's Sons," recounted a family tragedy that had become a footnote in the feverish media coverage after Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar spat on Hirschbeck after a controversial call in 1996.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 12, 2014
Georgetown University scientists reported this week on what they believe to be a promising - not to mention easy and inexpensive - blood test for Alzheimer's disease. Writing in the journal Nature Medicine, Dr. Howard Federoff and his team reported finding bio markers that were an accurate predictor of the disease 96 percent of the time. There are other tests, including scans, spinal taps and genetic tests, that reveal or predict Alzheimer's, but this blood test has the possibility of becoming something your doctor can order up during an office visit.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Johns Hopkins researchers are well on their way to building a digital library of children's brain images, which they say eventually will give doctors around the world access to a free Google-like search engine that could help diagnose and treat pediatric neurological disorders. The goal is for any doctor to be able to upload a patient's MRI scan, then wait for the computer to spit out results as it searches for images in the databank with similar patterns and known diagnoses. The databank, which has 7,000 brain images of Hopkins patients and counting, should be publicly available in three years, said Dr. Thierry Huisman, a professor of radiology, neurology and pediatrics and the director of pediatric radiology and neuroradiology at the Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Marcia Boyle | February 10, 2014
Maryland is justifiably proud of being a leader in many health care initiatives. Yet when it comes to adopting a simple policy that would save the lives of babies, Maryland policymakers are sadly behind much of the nation. While more than half of babies in the U.S. are routinely screened as newborns for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease ( SCID ), no babies in Maryland are screened for the condition. As a result, babies born with SCID in Maryland will be at a severe disadvantage, and some of them will die. SCID is commonly known as "bubble boy disease" after David Vetter, a young boy who lived in a germ-free bubble for 12 years.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 2, 2014
Chew on these for a minute: "Who are they? Are they these extreme conservatives, who are right-to-life, pro-assault-weapon, anti-gay, is that who they are? Because if that is who they are, and if they are the extreme conservatives, they have no place in the state of New York. Because that is not who New Yorkers are. " - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, with a directive for New York's GOP candidates last month. "It's not surprising then they get bitter. They cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
What can I do outdoors when we have a surprise nice day? I'm itching to garden. Pull up winter weeds. Some are already blooming! You can also prune, but wait for warmer weather in March for roses or fruit trees (especially peach and plum). As you wait to prune, this is a great time to get a clean look at branch structure and assess which limbs need to be removed because of rubbing branches or disease. For more pruning direction, check out the ornamental fact sheets on the University of Maryland Extension's Home and Garden Information Center website (under the Information Library publications)
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