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By Laura L. Ebner | September 16, 2010
My mother's life has not been an easy one. At the age of 42, she was widowed with four teenage children after my father died suddenly. She worked three jobs so we could get to where we are today. Her life was not glamorous. She scrubbed other people's floors and waited tables. To me, she looked beautiful, despite of, or maybe because of, the strength I saw in her sweaty brow and bucket of cleaning supplies. She volunteered at my elementary school and taught our class about art. She was my Girl Scout leader.
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HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
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HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
It was a few days after Christmas when 16-year-old Amanda Custer and her mom made a rare stop for a takeout burger. The indulgence ended badly for Amanda. Soon after, she said, "I felt real nauseous. Food was, like, gross. I got really bad cramps, a whole bunch of heartburn and an upset stomach. " And it didn't go away. "I would feel OK and try to eat something, and then I'd regret it," she recalled. "The pain afterwards was horrible. A couple of hours after I ate, I'd be going to the bathroom, feeling nauseous.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
"This is not West Africa," Texas health commissioner Dr. David Lakey said Wednesday at a news conference designed to dispel Texans' (and Americans') fear of an Ebola outbreak after a man there was diagnosed with the disease. "This is a very sophisticated city, a very sophisticated hospital. " The subtext: All those gruesome photos you're seeing of people dying in the streets in West Africa — that's something that happens over there, to other people, not here, not to us. But what the events of the last few days have shown is that it's exactly that kind of hubris that puts us most at risk, and that for all the sophistication of the U.S. health system, it only takes a simple lapse to create the conditions for a broader outbreak.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Sheri Lewis joined APL in 2001 as a public health analyst, an electronic disease surveillance system was just being developed at the lab. The impetus, she recalls, was Sept. 11 and the letters containing anthrax bacteria spores that were mailed the week after the attacks to several news media offices and two U.S. senators, killing five people and infecting 17 others.  “The data was there, but we needed to capture it and make it available to public health agencies in a more timely manner,” she says.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun Staff Reports | May 11, 2010
Baltimore police are investigating how an 18-month-old girl contracted gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease, and are trying to determine whether a family acquaintance is responsible, according to a department spokesman. No criminal charges have been filed. Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said detectives are focusing on a suspect based on statements from the infant's parents. "We are working as fast as we can with the Baltimore Child Abuse Center," Guglielmi said. He said the baby could undergo a test today to determine if she was raped.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
They may be elderly, frail and dealing with debilitating memory loss, but a lively beat, noisy maracas and an enthusiastic instructor can get them dancing. Deb Shavitz, a Zumba instructor who offers residents at Sunrise at Pikesville a free class each week, is convinced that music can jog the memory. "Music transcends everything," she said. "I don't care what the doctors say. Part of that individual still gets the music and I see the sparkle in their expression. " Residents at the assisted living home may not remember her name, but they know she is the "exercise lady," who brings them a routine steeped in the fast-paced Zumba dance genre, rooted in South America and growing in popularity across the U.S. The 58-year-old exercise lady is choreographing her third annual Zumbathon fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association Sunday, Nov. 4. She hopes to raise $10,000 for research into the disease that is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and one that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 24, 1992
Washington. -- At Barnes Hospital in St. Louis in 1919 a docto summoned some medical students to an autopsy, saying the patient's disease was so rare that most of the students would never see it again. It was lung cancer.That story, from John A. Meyer's article ''Cigarette Century'' in the December American Heritage, illuminates like a lightning flash this fact: Much -- probably most -- of America's hideously costly health-care crisis is caused by unwise behavior associated with eating, drinking, driving, sex, alcohol, drugs, violence and, especially, smoking.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
His mother's death 16 years ago came as a sudden shock to Sean Hull. Even more distressing was the family's discovery that Ida Hull had suffered in silence for years with sarcoidosis, a debilitating, often fatal disease that frequently attacks the lungs. "I made up my mind that I would do something for her and in her memory," said Hull, 47, a banker and NCAA college basketball official. "I am working in her spirit to fight this disease. " Proceeds from the fourth annual Flip-Flop Festivus Saturday at the Four Seasons hotel in Harbor East will help continue research into what the medical community calls an under-recognized disease.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Police have arrested the 22-year-old live-in boyfriend of a woman whose 7-year-old daughter contracted a sexually transmitted disease, charging him with second-degree rape. The suspect, a West Baltimore man who is not being identified to protect the privacy of the victim, was arrested Tuesday after giving an account of the incident to detectives in the Police Department's child abuse unit. The girl was taken to University of Maryland Medical Center on May 11 and was found to have gonorrhea.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Two people who stayed at an Econo Lodge in northern Ocean City this summer have tested positive for Legionnaires' disease and low levels of Legionella bacteria were found in the hotel's water pipes, Worcester County health officials said. Health officials zeroed in on the 145th Street hotel after a second person who stayed there tested positive for the infection Aug. 28, said Kathleen Derr, nursing program manager for communicable disease for the county health department. The other person became ill earlier in the summer, she said.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
Letter writer David Boyd's experience with tick borne illnesses is, unfortunately, not uncommon ( "Getting help for Lyme disease symptoms Aug. 25). Many patients never find a tick, never get a rash, never had any indication of a bite until they develop symptoms. And, while testing for Lyme disease is still not 100 percent reliable, even if Mr. Boyd didn't have Lyme, he could have had any number of associated tick borne diseases. To this end, the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS)
NEWS
August 25, 2014
I would like to add a few comments to the recent article about avoiding Lyme disease ( "Avoiding ticks is the key to preventing Lyme disease," Aug. 21). In mid-March of this year, I worked in the yard raking and bagging leaves left from the winter storms. I had Lyme disease two years ago so I checked myself over carefully and found no tick, rash or bite. However, about a week later I started getting mild headaches. Next, I experienced numbness in my feet, a slight ache in one ear, a mild ache in one hip joint and worst of all, extreme fatigue.
NEWS
By Robert McLean | August 23, 2014
I have watched the growing popularity of the "Ice Bucket Challenge" Facebook campaign against ALS - in which people dare others to record themselves being doused with ice water and/or make a donation to an ALS charity - with growing unease over the past week. My father, a physician at the University of Maryland, died of this little-known disease in 2001, about the time viral videos were beginning to take off. Until a couple of weeks ago, it was unthinkable that more than 2 percent of Americans would even have heard of ALS, though significantly more had at least heard of Lou Gehrig's disease - its other name.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Robin Ann Wolfender was infected with Lyme disease in 1979, when she was a 19-year-old summer camp counselor at Catoctin Mountain Park in Thurmont. Just five years earlier, the tick-borne disease had been named for the Connecticut town where children were developing odd target-shaped rashes and arthritis. Two more years would pass before researchers would link the symptoms to ticks that latched on to human bodies, secreting poisons as they consumed blood. Wolfender, now 54, developed a fever of 105. It took a week for the fever to break, she says, and 11 years for doctors to diagnose her worsening health as Lyme disease.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
Peggy and Tom Hart's second son was born on a humid July day in 1988 in a routine birth at a Towson hospital.The Bel Air couple took home their healthy 9 1/2 -pound infant, looking forward to all the joys they had experienced with their first son, Sean, who was 4.Baby Patrick smiled, cooed and developed normally until March 1989 when he was suddenly stricken by spasms and seizures.The 8-month-old was soon diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a little-understood genetic disease, that eventually ravaged his body with tumors.
FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | June 7, 2007
Although more than 30,000 people in the U.S. are infected with Lyme disease each year, Dr. Robert Edelman says most infections can be avoided or, if not, then treated. "Even [with] a tick that has been feeding on you for one day, your chance of getting Lyme disease is remote, because it takes two to three days of feeding to infect people," he says. "Besides, four out of five ticks are not infected." Some ticks are difficult to see. When I'm checking my body, what areas should I pay closest attention to?
HEALTH
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
When eight high school students are commissioned to make a graphic novel about sexual health, don't be surprised if the result includes pet dragons, a troll with genital warts and a guy named Funk Master Flexin'. These comedic touches appear in a booklet created during a six-week summer program for students at the Baltimore City Health Department that aims to raise awareness about sexual health and the department's relocated young adult center in Druid Hill. Meeting twice a week beginning July 8, the students were asked to write, photograph, draw, scan and digitally edit three stories about sexually transmitted diseases and birth control, and assemble them in a booklet.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Professional baseball great Tony Gwynn Sr., also known as Mr. Padre, died last month of salivary gland cancer, which he believed was caused by years of using smokeless chewing tobacco. The cancer is a rare form that begins in any of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat. Two adults in 100,000 are diagnosed with salivary gland cancer each year. The chances of survival drop if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Dr. Patrick K. Ha, with Johns Hopkins Head and Neck Surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, says new types of treatments and therapies are in the works to treat the disease.
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