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Discrimination

NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Tisha Guthrie applied for a housing voucher in 2004 when she became legally blind. After waiting five years for approval, she says, she still struggled for a long time to find quality housing. She had lived in one Mount Vernon apartment for a year before she began a seven-month search for a place in Baltimore County, where she thought she'd find more adequate housing in a quieter setting. "I'd stop by leasing offices and it'd be going well, but when I told them I have vouchers, they'd turn me away," she said.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
An African-American Baltimore County police sergeant claims in a federal lawsuit that he faced threats and discrimination after reporting that two white officers used excessive force and made an unlawful arrest. Sgt. Randy Williams, who worked in Woodlawn before being transferred last spring to Cockeysville, claims his superiors routinely treated him differently from other equally ranked officers who were white. The allegations are the latest against a department that has struggled with diversity in its ranks.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper | November 13, 2013
The first time Kai Bacharach uttered his name — his male name, the one he chose for himself — was in the spring, at an event for students accepted to Goucher. For the first 18 years of life, Bacharach used the female name his parents bestowed at birth. But when it came time to start college this year, Bacharach decided to slough off an identity that never felt true. His professors, resident advisers and classmates all know him as Kai, a man. "It makes going back to see my family weird," said Bacharach, a Baltimore native who declined to reveal his birth name.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
The Department of Veterans Affairs is approving claims for post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from military sexual assault or harassment at rates that are "significantly lower" than those for PTSD from combat and other causes, advocacy groups said Thursday. The advocates said the lower rates mean women - who are more likely than men to file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma - are denied compensation for PTSD disproportionately. But when men do file claims for PTSD related to sexual trauma, they said, they are approved at rates lower than those for women.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
Most Americans believe that a person should not be discriminated against in the workplace because of sexual orientation. Polls have shown this consistently and strongly for years. So it shouldn't be too much of a shock if the U.S. Senate this week approves legislation to ban on-the-job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Yet it is a bit of an eye-opener. Not because it's not the right thing to do but because there are still so many lawmakers in Washington and around the country who favor discrimination.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
The Employment Non-Discrimination Act, a bill that would ban hiring and employment discrimination against LGBT individuals, will proceed in the Senate after 61 senators voted for a cloture motion that will lead to a final vote on the bill. Maryland Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin were among the legislators to vote "yes" on cloture, which limits the amount of time ENDA can be debated before a final vote on the measure is eventually held.  Seven Republicans voted in support of the bill: ENDA co-sponsors Sens.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Republican Senator Dean Heller, the junior Senator from Nevada, announced Monday his support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) , which likely makes him the crucial 60th vote in Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's attempt to get the bill approved by the Senate. The battle to get ENDA passed during the current session of Congress has been long and protracted, with the legislation receiving bursts of media attention that punctuate long waiting periods. Reid's attempt to set up a cloture vote - which would prevent an attempted filibuster that could kill the bill - brought the most recent flurry of updates.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Happy Halloween! Let's talk about something truly terrifying: LGBT discrimination in hiring. Maybe not as viscerally scream-inducing as ghouls or witches, I know. But after progress on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act got halted by a government shutdown and fights over the debt ceiling, BuzzFeed reported Thursday that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is likely to start setting up a Monday vote on beginning debate on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act , also known as ENDA.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 30, 2013
Harford County-based Upper Chesapeake Health System is the subject of a complaint and lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of a former employee who claims she was discriminated against because of a disability and retaliated against when she sought federal relief. The civil suit was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and alleges the non-profit health care company "failed to provide a reasonable accommodation, fired, and later refused to rehire a pulmonary function technologist because of her disability and in retaliation for her requesting an accommodation and complaining about discrimination," according to a news release issued Friday by EEOC's Baltimore office.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
In news as infuriating as it is unsurprising, International Olympic Committee officials said Thursday they were "fully satisfied" that a Russian law barring gay propaganda doesn't violate the Olympic charter's anti-discrimination language, the Washington Post reports . To repeat: A law engineered under the auspices of preventing gay and lesbian individuals from indoctrinating the youth (I'm reading between the lines here) both in person and through the media is apparently consistent with the Olympic Charter's language on discrimination.
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