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Discrimination

NEWS
By Linda Cotton | January 4, 1991
DAN QUAYLE played 18 holes before someone tapped him on the shoulder and pointed out that there were protesters outside the Cyprus Point Golf Course. The vice president was shocked. Protest? Trouble? Whatever could be the matter?The matter was a simple one, and until last week I suspected the only people who didn't know about it were those who were vacationing in LindaCottonSamoa last summer. That's when civil rights groups protested holding the PGA championship at Shoal Creek Country Club, an all-white club in Birmingham, Ala., which barred blacks as either members or guests.
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NEWS
By Marsha H. Nathanson | June 9, 1993
WHERE were you in 1960?I was 7 years old and in the second grade.My world consisted of the street on which I lived. I had my school and my friends and my Barbie doll, and that was about it. I didn't read the newspaper, I didn't watch the news on TV, I had no concept of current events.only brush with politics came one morning as I waited outside Howard Park Elementary School for the doors to open. I listened as some kids debated whether John F. Kennedy would be the next president. I didn't know who Kennedy was. I barely understood the notion of next president.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
Dr. Margaret Jensvold hoped to break ground in science -- not law -- when she accepted a prestigious fellowship at the National Institute of Mental Health in 1987.The Johns Hopkins medical school graduate had been named one of the six "most promising" psychiatric residents in the United States. She envisioned a future in research and writing, perhaps chairing a department at a medical school one day.Instead, Dr. Jensvold has all but abandoned that dream to turn a national spotlight on a scientific fraternity she says squeezed her out of its ranks.
NEWS
By [JENNIFER SKALKA] and [JENNIFER SKALKA],Sun Reporter | May 16, 2007
Gov.Martin O'Malley signed an executive order yesterday stating that state employment decisions will be based solely on merit and fitness, and reinforcing an anti-discrimination policy for hiring and personnel activity. The order also mandates that the secretary of budget and management appoint a statewide equal opportunity coordinator to ensure that Maryland is complying with state and federal employment laws. "To bring the best workers to Maryland?s state government we need to guarantee every employee the basic protections that they deserve, and that our state government sets an example for equal employment opportunities throughout Maryland," the governor said in a statement.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | November 18, 1990
The Carroll County Community Relations Commission has drawn 10 complaints of discrimination on the basis of physical disability, race and ethnicity during its first 10 months.Still, "There are people who really believe we don't have those problems in Carroll County," said Carroll County Commissioner Jeff Griffith at a panel discussion and forum the Community Relations Commission conducted Wednesday night at William Winchester Elementary School in Westminster.About 30 people attended the forum, conducted to publicize the new commission's goal of investigating disputes over discrimination for race, gender, age, religion, physical and mental handicaps, marital status, national origin and ancestry.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 25, 2001
Fifty percent of Maryland voters support a state law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation, while 36 percent oppose the law and 14 percent are undecided, according to a poll released yesterday. The poll by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research found that women are more likely than men to favor the law, which was approved this year by the General Assembly. The firm surveyed 625 likely voters by telephone between Friday and Monday. It has a margin of error of 4 percentage points.
NEWS
By Chai Feldblum | September 24, 2007
On Sept. 5, Michael Carney, an openly gay Massachusetts police officer, eloquently told members of the House of Representatives why the Employment Non-Discrimination Act continues to be essential. Mr. Carney, who endured job discrimination once he made the courageous decision to come out to his colleagues, said, "Had I not been successful in fighting the bias that tried to prevent me from working, all the good I have done for some of the most vulnerable people in my community would never have happened."
NEWS
June 1, 1993
Thousands of discrimination complaints are filed every year. Some of them make the local news pages; most we never hear of. It takes a national cause celebre, such as the federal lawsuit involving six black Secret Service agents versus the Denny's restaurant in Annapolis, to wake us up to the fact that this country has far to go in race relations.The agents, assigned to protect President Clinton at the U.S. Naval Academy two months ago, sat for a full hour without being served while white customers all around them, including their own colleagues, were waited on.Just slow service, as Denny's claims?
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | June 8, 2004
CHICAGO -- David R. Gillespie may be an unlikely Rosa Parks, but we have to take our civil rights heroes where we find them. Ms. Parks rebelled because, being black, she was told to ride in the back of an Alabama bus while whites got to sit up front. Mr. Gillespie could not tolerate paying a $5 cover price on "ladies' night" at a New Jersey bar while females were getting in free. This being a civil rights drama, you can guess how it ends. Mr. Gillespie took legal action, and last week, the walls of discrimination came tumbling down.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 9, 1993
Washington -- A caller to a radio show recently suggested that the fate of Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott, punished by fellow baseball owners for uttering racial slurs, should be left up to market forces. If the fans are offended, the caller reasons, the fans should stay away from her ballpark.That, to me, is free advice that's worth every penny of what the listener pays to hear it.But there is another way that market forces could play a bigger role in encouraging equal opportunity. Former Harvard Law Professor Derrick Bell suggests something similar in his book ''Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism.
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