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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 20, 2004
A "new" musical by the composer of Guys and Dolls and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying would be newsworthy under any circumstance. But what makes Senor Discretion Himself even bigger news is that this sparkling show is truly a poca gema (little gem). Thirty-five years after Frank Loesser's death, Arena Stage in Washington has given his charming final work its world premiere. A must-see for musical-theater lovers, Senor Discretion is spankingly fresh at the same time that it deserves to be an instant American musical classic.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
When Ray Rice received a two-game suspension from the NFL last week for a fight in which he knocked his wife unconscious, many were quick to compare it to harsher penalties handed down for other players' lesser infractions. In 2008, New York Giant Plaxico Burress was suspended for twice as long for accidentally shooting himself in his leg. Josh Gordon of the Cleveland Browns now faces a season-long exile for marijuana use. The disparity again thrust the NFL's disciplinary system into the spotlight.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2000
A year-old Baltimore police program that made midlevel managers accountable for crime and community relations is being dismantled this week because poor resources made proper implementation impossible. Under the department's "sector management" plan, lieutenants were assigned geographic beats and held responsible for anything that happened there 24 hours a day. In return, they were supposed to have discretion over officer deployment and money. Twenty-eight lieutenants were given patrol cars to take home so they could quickly respond to incidents.
NEWS
By Michael B. Runnels | April 9, 2014
Responding to the Obama Administration's decision to delay enforcement of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a number of politicians and commentators have argued that the president is running roughshod over the U.S. Constitution. To this point, constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley recently argued that such actions are presenting a "troubling mosaic" of executive power, and that "there will come a day when people step back and see the entire mosaic for what it truly represents: a new system with a dominant president with both legislative and executive powers.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2007
The Supreme Court gave federal judges latitude yesterday to impose shorter prison terms for crack cocaine-related crimes, part of a pair of decisions that allow judges, who were once tightly controlled by mandatory guidelines, to exercise broad discretion in sentencing. The high court's decision arrived ahead of a vote today by the U.S. Sentencing Commission, which will decide whether such sentences should be reconsidered. If so, it could mean reduced federal prison time for up to 19,500 inmates nationwide, including 279 in Maryland, according to the commission.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 7, 1993
At least we don't have to learn how to spell Guinier. Or pronounce it.Bill has decided that discretion is the better part of valor. Unfortunately, he has no discretion.The new rule of politics: Appoint no one unless you can defend everything he has written, which is solved by appointing someone who has written nothing.Why don't all the local big shots who say they want to buy the Orioles join sides and outbid the other guys?
NEWS
November 19, 1997
*TC An editorial in The Sun yesterday on disaster relief for farmers incorrectly stated that funds from an emergency feed program are no longer available. While the law expired five years ago, $32 million remains in a reserve account, which can be dispensed at the discretion of the U.S. secretary of agriculture.The Sun regrets the errorPub Date: 11/19/97
NEWS
By Michael B. Runnels | April 9, 2014
Responding to the Obama Administration's decision to delay enforcement of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a number of politicians and commentators have argued that the president is running roughshod over the U.S. Constitution. To this point, constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley recently argued that such actions are presenting a "troubling mosaic" of executive power, and that "there will come a day when people step back and see the entire mosaic for what it truly represents: a new system with a dominant president with both legislative and executive powers.
NEWS
By J. Joseph Curran Jr | December 29, 1996
I AM WRITING in response to your Dec. 23 editorial ("Passengers: Exit on command?") regarding the argument I recently presented before the U.S. Supreme Court. As your editorial reflects, the Supreme Court did question me about the inconveniences that may be faced by a passenger who is asked to step out of the vehicle.These are important questions that both I and Janet Reno, the attorney general of the United States, seriously considered in deciding to request the Supreme Court to allow police officers to ask passengers to exit a stopped vehicle.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
A state court panel will consider today whether to end the nearly complete discretion judges have to shorten criminals' sentences - a restriction that prosecutors and victim advocates have sought for a decade over the objection of defense lawyers and some judges. The judiciary's Rules Committee will take up a proposal to place a five-year limit from the date of the original sentence on the time judges have to reduce sentences for violent crimes. There is no time limit - a situation that opponents say is unique to Maryland - and criminals have returned to the courtroom more than a decade after being imprisoned to ask judges to shorten their sentences.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
The NCAA has sent a new memo to athletic conferences acknowledging that it has for many years barred schools from awarding a “game ball” to an athlete -- but also emphasizing that the rule is being changed. The purpose of the memo, obtained by The Baltimore Sun, appears to be to clarify the NCAA's position. The position came into question after an NCAA spokeswoman told The Sun recently: “A student-athlete can keep a game ball.” In fact, the NCAA legislative services staff -- in a 1996 “interpretation” -- had concluded otherwise.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Sitting around a broad table in a nondescript office in Reisterstown last week, more than a dozen mental health advocates, medical professionals and law enforcement officials stared tensely at one another. Nearly a month after the state-created task force issued a report outlining its findings on psychiatric patients' access to firearms, several members were questioning a key recommendation - that mental health professionals should be required to report to law enforcement all patients who threaten suicide.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
The Baltimore County school board voted Tuesday night to get rid of a zero-tolerance approach to discipline and replace it with a policy that will give principals more discretion in deciding how to handle serious offenses. The county has one of the highest suspension rates in the state, and school leaders hope to reduce the number of times a student is sent home from school for minor infractions. The new policy will also give school leaders more discretion in cases where principals have no choice about what punishment to give a student.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Proposed changes to the student behavior policy for Baltimore County schools sparked a lively debate among county Board of Education members at a work session Tuesday night - with some arguing for their immediate passage and others requesting more time to review them. The considered changes would tweak the school system's current policy, namely to allow principals to use their own discretion when considering how to punish a student for committing infractions that currently require the student be expelled or assigned to an alternative academic program.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
All lions - not some - will bite your head off. All bears - not some - will shred you to pieces. All crocodiles - not some - will chop you in half. These are examples of "inherently dangerous" animals. To the contrary, only some pit bulls - but not all - will hurt you. That's why there needs to be a case-by-case determination of the facts about a particular dog. A blanket ruling condemning an entire breed is the epitome of intellectual laziness and the absence of judicial discretion.
NEWS
By Paul Thomson | May 19, 2011
Remember John Tyner? He was the young man whose smartphone captured an "enhanced" pat-down at the San Diego Airport — a search immortalized when he warned, "Don't touch my junk. " This simple quote captured how many of us felt about the government getting too much into our business. After this episode, I never imagined publicly using the Department of Homeland Security as an example of government common sense. Unfortunately, recent actions by the Talbot Public County Schools — the suspension of two lacrosse players (and arrest of one of them)
NEWS
November 24, 1993
About half of those who leave Maryland prisons on parole have been released under mandatory provisions in the law or in their sentences. The Maryland Parole Commission has no discretion in the matter. When the commission does have discretion, it can and sometimes does act in an unprofessional way. That is, commissioners, most of whom are not trained for the job and some of whom are political appointees, make arbitrary decisions, in secret, without the advice of parole agents. Sometimes commissioners act despite advice of parole agents.
NEWS
May 21, 2004
VICTIMS' RIGHTS advocates have finally prevailed in their drive to limit the freedom of Maryland judges to reduce a defendant's sentence. And that is as it should be. Marylanders have a right to expect that a sentence imposed at trial will stand. It's not an unreasonable expectation, but a few judges in some well-publicized cases in recent years have allowed convicted murderers to skip out on their sentences, leaving victims and their families aghast and upset. The state's highest court last week adopted a rules change that gives trial judges only five years from the imposition of sentence to reduce it. Until now, Maryland has been unique in the country in the discretion it gives judges to reconsider a sentence.
NEWS
By John Nethercut | October 6, 2010
At a New Year's Eve party at a Baltimore home last year, several adults fired guns into the air. When police arrived, they arrested three adults and a 17-year-old I'll call Bernard. Never in trouble with the law before, Bernard was charged as an adult and held in adult jail until his family could produce bail. Like many states during the 1990s, Maryland passed "tough-on-crime" laws that automatically send many teenagers, like Bernard, into the adult criminal justice system. These laws were based on fear — fear of juvenile "super-predators," a popular notion at the time — and fanned by occasional high-profile crimes committed by kids.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
A note from the jury on Monday in Mayor Sheila Dixon's criminal trial offered a subtle but tantalizing hint that the case could be headed for a split decision, an outcome that legal analysts say is available, if procedurally perilous. A note from the forewoman arrived in court about 3:15 p.m. saying jurors could not reach unanimity on all five counts related to charges that Dixon stole gift cards intended for needy families. Whether they had come to a joint decision on any count was not clear.
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