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NEWS
November 2, 2010
As one of the afflicted, I was comforted to learn that this pernicious defect has been isolated ("There's a 'liberal gene,' researchers say," Nov. 2). My own genetic misfortune has been apparent since I cast my first misguided ballot for Adlai Stevenson in 1956, and it is no doubt far too late for any medical intervention to be effective. But this latest discovery will surely bring about a revolution in the attitude toward stem cell research on the part of George W. Bush, the Vatican, various members of the U.S. Congress and all those other virtuous and right thinking souls who have opposed it so vigorously in the past.
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NEWS
By D. A. Henderson | August 6, 2014
The only known stocks of the deadly smallpox virus are now kept in two designated research laboratories, one in Russia and one in the United States. This has troubled many who believe that destruction of the virus would provide greater assurance that it would never again threaten the world. Some scientists, however, insist that the intact smallpox virus is essential for their studies of new vaccines - even though the vaccines themselves are entirely different viruses. The decision to destroy the virus has thus been debated and postponed repeatedly in the World Health Assembly over the past 15 years.
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BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
The message appears on electronic signs atop Manhattan phone kiosks, on posters in seaside towns of Great Britain, in television and magazine ads spanning the globe. For the Discovery Channel, three words say it all: "Explore Your World."Chris Moseley, Discovery Communications Inc.'s senior vice president for marketing and communications, likes the sound of the slogan she chose and the message behind it -- no frills, no glitz, the antithesis of Madison Avenue hype.The Baltimore native liked it so much, she put it in ads everywhere, on T-shirts, on toys in Discovery stores, on Discovery videocassettes, on Discovery CD-ROMs.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
You can't see the Higgs boson, but you can watch its discovery. Scientists crowd around dozens of monitors as they collect data from experiments using a looping 17-mile underground tunnel and equipment likened to a five-story Swiss watch. They worry what the media might say if tests fail, and wonder whether the experiment should have been conducted in secret. And they clamor for a seat in the auditorium where physicists will present their findings in the hunt for the elusive "God particle," a subatomic building block that existed only in theory, but had never been detected.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 12, 1999
The discovery of a pipe bomb led to the evacuation of more than 40 trailers in a mobile home park in Edgewood yesterday afternoon, state police reported.Gary Capello told police he discovered a plastic garbage bag containing the homemade explosive device while mowing his lawn at the Bauers Mobile Home Park about 3 p.m., authorities said.State police bomb technicians defused it shortly before 6 p.m., and the residents were allowed to return. The incident remained under investigation last night.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2008
NEW YORK - Ted Koppel knows that persuading television viewers to tune into a four-part documentary about China's economic growth could be a difficult sell. So in the days leading to the broadcast of his latest Discovery Channel program, the veteran newsman took a drastic step to gin up interest: He brought his daughter's dog onto The Daily Show and suggested that the network might send Pepper to "Bideawee Farm" if the series doesn't get good ratings. All kidding aside, Koppel feels a particular sense of urgency about The People's Republic of Capitalism, which premieres tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | February 27, 2000
NEW YORK -- John Hendricks, the 47-year-old founder of the Discovery Channel, walks briskly toward the Rose Room at the Plaza Hotel, where he will unveil his bid for a piece of the Internet. For months this soft-spoken chief executive with the schoolboy haircut has been possessed by the idea. For years he has rehearsed for the questions he's about to be asked. Now, he checks to be sure someone has made handouts of his slide show. They explain why his Maryland-based cable programming giant intends to invest $500 million in a medium seemingly foreign to television documentaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brendan A. Maher and Brendan A. Maher,contributing writer | March 19, 2000
While the Discovery Channel has been busy thawing out woolly mammoths from frozen tundra this winter, it's become what you might call hot stuff itself elsewhere on the TV and radio dial. Recent network TV shows and a heavily played pop single by the Philadelphia-based Bloodhound Gang have celebrated the more prurient side of those Discovery nature shows: the mating sequences. For instance, in Bloodhound Gang's "The Bad Touch," radio listeners and MTV viewers hear front-man Jimmy Pop's deadpan monotone croon this refrain over and over: "You and me baby ain't nothin' but mammals.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
Discovery Communications, which operates such cable channels as Discovery Channel and Animal Planet, may be working on its own e-book reader, according to a U.S. patent application made public Thursday. The diagrams included with Discovery's patent application, which was filed in February, depict a rectangular device with physical controls for user navigation. The device would be for reading e-books and "providing for e-commerce," and would be a direct competitor to the Amazon Kindle electronic book reader and the Sony Reader digital book reader.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 1999
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The countdown clock is ticking. The weather looks good. And after four months of repairs, shuttle Discovery appears ready at last to blast off tonight on a crucial 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope.It's the last human spaceflight of the 1900s. It's also the first shuttle launch from Kennedy Space Center since July.Then, a short circuit moments after liftoff knocked out a pair of computers used to control two of Columbia's three main engines. Backup computers allowed Columbia to safely complete a tense ride to orbit.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| March 7, 2014
Port Discovery is celebrating its 15th birthday on March 15 with discounted admission ($5 instead of the usual $13.95 per person ages 2 and up) and a variety of activities including Pop Up Science demonstrations, yoga, face painting, interactive storytelling, music with Mr. Norman and more. "Our Birthday Bonanza is our opportunity to thank our visitors and the greater Baltimore community for helping Port Discovery to become not just one of Maryland's most popular destinations for families, but one of the highest-rated children's museums in the country," said Bryn Parchman, Port Discovery's president and CEO. For more information, call 410-727-8120 or visit portdiscovery.org .  
NEWS
March 4, 2014
Today, I came across a box we hadn't unpacked when we moved. I tore off the packing tape and cautiously looked inside. I say cautiously because, knowing me, there could have been a three-year-old bag of Peanut M&Ms in there. Not that their age would have deterred me from eating them. Once, I found a yellow Peanut M&M at the bottom of a messenger bag I'd lugged to and from work for three years - at a previous job. I just wiped it on my shirt and ate it. Sadly, there were no M&Ms lurking in the box, I had come across.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Who knew that a man renowned for his progressive-minded accomplishments in advancing an educational institution would prefer to spend his leisure exploring underdeveloped lands and ancient civilizations? That, in a nutshell, describes Maryland Institute College of Art President Fred Lazarus. The Harvard graduate, widely acclaimed for launching Baltimore's once-local art college onto the world stage, is recognized as a leader in art and design education for more than three decades.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Who exactly J.W. Hogg was to Baltimore's Washington Monument may be a question left for the ages. Master craftsman who helped build it? Or vandal who defaced it? Hogg's name, written in block letters with a pencil next to the date 1829, was among dozens of 19th-century signatures and drawings discovered this week by a restoration crew using hand tools to delicately remove loose plaster from the monument's subterranean vaults. "They could be craftsmen They could be carpenters.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
After a 2-7 start, the Mount St. Mary's men's basketball team has gone 4-4 since then, and a critical factor in the squad's progress has been its improved accuracy. Over the last eight games, the Mountaineers (6-11 overall and 2-2 in the Northeast Conference) connected on 47.9 percent (218-of-455) of their shots and 42.5 percent (79-of-186) of their three-point attempts. Those numbers are a sizable difference from their 39.7 percent (209-of-527) from the floor and 31.0 percent (76-of-245)
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | November 21, 2013
The Washington Spirit acquired midfielder Christine Nairn (Archbishop Spalding) from the Seattle Reign on Wednesday in exchange for the discovery rights to forward Kim Little. This trade is the final piece of a larger trade in which the Spirit acquired Nairn, forward Renae Cuellar and the discovery rights for forward Jodie Taylor. Seattle received the discovery rights to Kim Little, Nikki Marshall and Alina Garciamendez. Nairn, 23, was selected by the Reign with the seventh overall pick in the 2013 NWSL college draft.
BUSINESS
By Leon Lazaroff and Leon Lazaroff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 21, 2005
NEW YORK - Owning Liberty Media Corp. has always been about owning a piece of John C. Malone. As a leading cable TV mogul, the cunning and charismatic Malone can usually be expected to do something daring - and profitable. But for the past four years, Liberty Media's chairman, chief executive and all-around guru has been unable to move his stock much above the low double-digits. It touched $25 before the Internet bubble burst in March 2000. So today, Malone will try to do what many media owners are trying to do these days: "unlock" value from his holdings, by spinning off Liberty's 50 percent stake in Discovery Communications Inc., the Silver Spring, Md. company that is one of the world's most treasured cable-TV properties.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 1996
Scientists studying a meteorite that fell to Earth from Mars have identified organic compounds and certain minerals that they conclude "are evidence for primitive life on early Mars."The discovery of the first organic molecules ever seen in a Martian rock is being hailed as startling and compelling evidence that at least microbial life existed on Mars long ago, when the planet was warmer and wetter.The molecules found in the rock, which left Mars some 15 million years ago, are being described as the fossil trace of past biological activity.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
After five years of below-average performance, Baltimore County's only charter school will lose its license to operate in July, but will continue as a regular public school next year. The Baltimore County school board voted Tuesday night to pull the charter from Imagine Discovery Public Charter School, the Woodlawn-area school that families had fought for years to keep open. Imagine Discovery parents are generally satisfied with the transfer of leadership because they believe the school will remain open with the same principal and teachers, said Charles Sydnor, who is on the school's PTA leadership team.
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