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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 26, 1997
Two investment companies have resolved a lawsuit over Baltimore County regulations intended to discourage hyperinflated bids for properties at tax auctions, an issue in several Maryland counties.Harry L. Chase, lawyer for Fundco Inc. and Heartwood '88 Inc., said the suit was resolved last week after Baltimore County agreed not to require proof that his clients had the money to buy the properties on which they successfully bid.He said his clients were only required to give the county general financial information about their companies.
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NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
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NEWS
August 1, 1999
To lower costs, discourage migration to MarylandMarcia Myers' article in The Sun July 22 got my blood to boiling again. I just find it difficult living in a state full of tax-and-spend career politicians. When it comes to actually solving day-to-day problems of the state, they jerryrig some commission to come up with a report that is worded in such a way that the only solution is to raise taxes.I am going to do them a big favor and provide the answer. I guarantee that the cost of the report from the 30-member transportation commission was more than that.
NEWS
By John K. Delaney | April 2, 2014
In the context of Russia's invasion of Ukraine and a still stagnant economy, President Barack Obama faces two important questions on energy transmission: a decision on the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline and the question of increasing American natural gas exports. These are choices that will resonate from Crimea to Cove Point. In my judgment, the president should reject Keystone and step up natural gas exports. Here's why. The right analytical framework for these decisions has several component questions: what's consistent with our environmental and energy policy objectives, what's in our economic self-interest, and what serves our geopolitical goals.
NEWS
By Houston Chronicle | April 15, 1993
The U.S. State Department is bringing a little color into your life. Beginning this week, all new American passports will turn from blue to green.The change is part of the State Department's efforts to discourage counterfeiters, said Gary Sheaffer of the agency's Bureau of Consular Affairs in Washington. The changes are taking place nationwide.Mr. Sheaffer said that passport design is periodically upgraded to incorporate new technologies that discourage counterfeiters and forgers."This passport has some very nice features,," he said.
NEWS
June 1, 2008
Mayor Sheila Dixon's proposal to ban the sale of individual "little cigars" would probably discourage some Baltimore youngsters from buying them, but it's only the tiniest step in the right direction. The problem is more fundamental: They aren't really cigars at all, but an increasingly popular way to skirt cigarette taxes and distribute flavored tobacco cheaply, especially to young African-Americans. Unlike genuine cigars that are rolled tobacco leaf, little cigars are more like oversized cigarettes in dark brown paper.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 1997
My 8-year-old has shown an interest in young adult horror books. I'm happy he wants to read, but I'm concerned that he may be influenced by this type of literature. What should I do?It is rare for a child to sustain interest in reading material that is completely beyond him. We concur that reading is such a positive activity that we are loathe to discourage a child who is eager to read, almost without exception. However, there are certainly situations in which we would recommend trying to attract children to different, but equally engaging, material.
NEWS
December 14, 1994
As Carroll County's newly elected state's attorney, Jerry F. Barnes has the opportunity to change a number of long-standing practices of the prosecutor's office. Beginning the selective use of polygraph tests on rape victims, however, should not be among those changes.Even if lie detector use would be a "one-in-a-thousand kind of thing," as Mr. Barnes said, testing rape victims demeans them and sends the wrong message to the community. We can't fathom the motives of Mr. Barnes, who this fall unseated the county's prosecutor of 20 years, Thomas E. Hickman.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 4, 1994
Attempting to discourage prostitution along Ritchie Highway in Brooklyn Park, the County Council last night unanimously passed an anti-loitering bill that includes an attention-getting $1,000 fine.The bill, which goes to the county executive for his signature, was introduced by Councilman George Bachman, a Linthicum Democrat. The measure could give frustrated police officers a means to drive away suspected prostitutes.Under the bill, someone refusing an officer's request to move on would be subject to a citation or arrest, with a maximum fine of $1,000 and six months in jail.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | May 14, 1995
Havre de Grace.-- Sripriya Natarajan, a Roland Park Country ** School junior, achieves a perfect 1,600 score on her Scholastic Aptitude Test this spring. Only a handful of students manage such a feat each year, and so she is appropriately admired and interviewed.Her success Ms. Natarajan -- ''Priya'' -- attributes primarily to her reading, which she started when she was 4. Now, as a teen-ager, she reads constantly and omnivorously. The animation in her voice makes it plain that to her, reading isn't a chore or an obligation.
TRAVEL
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Golly gee whillikers! Looks like we'll be minding our mouths at the beach this summer. The Town of Ocean City will be posting signs along the boardwalk this spring asking people to refrain from using foul language.  "We really pride ourselves on being a family resort, a first class resort for families to come to visit," said Ocean City spokeswoman Jessica Waters. So what happens if you drop your soft ice cream and drop an F-bomb too? "There will not be any kind of punishment for those that curse on the boardwalk," said Waters.  The town council approved the signs at its Monday meeting, Waters said.  Councilwoman Mary Knight proposed posting the gentle reminders after spotting similar signs in Viriginia Beach.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
The Baltimore school board will no longer back loans for charter school facilities, a move that the city's coalition of charter operators calls "short-sighted" and said could deter those looking to open the in-demand schools. The district has served as guarantor for three charter schools, City Neighbors, Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and the Baltimore Design School, to either purchase or conduct large renovations of their facilities. But board members said now that they have the $1 billion task of rebuilding and renovating the school district's infrastructure ahead of them — a process that is financed by debt — the district cannot risk more capital improvement bills.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Anybody who has ever encountered the college admissions process knows that there's no such thing as an even playing field. Most schools will admit that upfront. "Like all colleges," Harvard College notes on its own admissions web site, "we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible. " In other words, schools often try to balance out an incoming class with students who not only have good grades or high test scores but have had unusual life experiences as well as those they regard as "well rounded.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The peak of hurricane season is approaching later this month, but storm activity in the middle of the Atlantic is unlikely to develop during the first half of August because of a massive cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert moving across the ocean. Satellite images from earlier this week (shown above) revealed a burst of dust blowing westward off of Africa. NASA Global Hawk aircraft were scheduled to explore the dust further on Tuesday. Saharan dust can significantly discourage tropical cyclone formation in the Atlantic, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
So, letter writer Patrick Donoho, president of the Maryland Retailers Association, is worried that hard-working Marylanders won't be able to afford cigarettes if there is a tax increase ("Hike in cigarette tax threatens Md. Retailers," July 17)? This is actually a good thing as maybe it will be an incentive for Marylanders who can't afford cancer sticks to give them up - not just for their own health but for the sake of those around them too. And if convenience stores can only make their living off a substance that causes cancer, then it's time for them to either think of better ways to make money or to close up shop.
NEWS
By Dinah Miller | February 11, 2013
In December, a young man in Newtown, Conn., killed 20 small children and seven adults, including his mother, and then committed suicide. This tragic massacre has prompted legislators to reexamine firearms laws and quickly propose legislation that might prevent future mass murders. Much of it focuses on people who have sought mental health care. The Maryland General Assembly is considering legislation that requires mental health clinicians to report patients who are potentially dangerous for the purpose of restricting their access to guns.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport officials are discouraging Ravens fans planning to greet the Super Bowl winners as they arrive at the airport Monday. Ravens officials say the team is expected to return from New Orleans Monday afternoon after beating the San Francisco 49s in 34-31 Sunday. An airport spokesman said the team does not enter the airport through the public passenger terminal. BWI also discouraged Ravens fans from congregating when the team returned from Foxborough, Mass., after beating the New England Patriots in the AFC championship in January.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 1, 2013
The dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine wants his staff to celebrate the Baltimore Ravens as they head to the Super Bowl. E. Albert Reece just doesn't want them to celebrate too much. Reece sent an email to staff this week asking them to stay professional as they root for the home team. The email read:   We are very proud of the performance of the Baltimore Ravens' team, and we are clearly  "rooting" for their success.   However, many may choose to wear a purple accent on their clothing.  I would request that we maintain the professionalism of our choices and deportment.
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