Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDisconnected
IN THE NEWS

Disconnected

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 22, 1994
POLICE LOG* Laurel: Someone disconnected the 602 Club's alarm system Tuesday morning, forced open a rear kitchen door at the nightclub in the 3200 block of Laurel Fort Meade Road, and stole $292 worth of cigarettes and $500.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 13, 2013
The thing might be funny, except that somebody died. That part isn't funny at all. But the rest of it, the moments before Justin Valdez was killed, read like some twisted skit on "Saturday Night Live. " You have to get the picture as captured on surveillance video and described by authorities in a story published last week by the San Francisco Chronicle. You have to see the suspect, 30-year-old Nikhom Thephakaysone, sitting on the light-rail train, pulling out his .45-caliber pistol, pointing it across the aisle, putting it back, pulling it out several times again, and at one point wiping his nose with the hand holding the gun -- and nobody notices because they're too busy staring down at their smartphones and tablet computers.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 16, 1995
POLICE LOG* Ellicott City: 3300 block of Ambra Court: Coins and compact discs were stolen after someone entered an unlocked garage, a resident told police Monday.3100 block of Fox Valley Drive: Burglars pried open the rear window of a model home Sunday or Monday, entered and disconnected a dishwasher but hauled off a generator instead, police said.
NEWS
By Renee A. Foose | July 17, 2013
The release of the Maryland School Assessment results - anticipated early next week - will surely send a ripple of shock to parents across the state. Educators are bracing for dips in math performance. At first glance, the scores will appear to indicate that student achievement has fallen, when in fact they reflect a mismatch between what is taught and what is tested. Maryland, like most other states throughout the nation, is in the process of transitioning to new reading and math curricula aligned to the Common Core State Standards, which show great promise for ensuring students are equipped with 21st century skills.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 2007
The more we study payments being made, the more we begin to see the unbelievable phenomena of literally sending farm bill payments to people who live in Manhattan and San Francisco. ... I mean, they may own land, but they're really pretty disconnected from farming." - MIKE JOHANNS, U.S. secretary of agriculture, lamenting the subsidies the government pays to wealthy landowners who do little or no farming
NEWS
October 23, 2005
In Maryland's cities and elsewhere, an underclass of disconnected teens and young adults struggles silently to make a life and a living. They need help - from guardians, neighborhoods and governments. Instead, they are neglected or they receive such unreliable aid that they feel safer going it alone. That's dangerous for them and for Maryland, which cannot afford to lose at least 15 percent of its future work force statewide, according to an estimate by the nonprofit Annie E. Casey Foundation.
NEWS
By Scott Timberg | January 19, 1992
TROPICAL NIGHT FALLING.Manuel Puig; translated from the Spanish by Suzanne Jill Levine.Simon & Schuster.189 pages. $19. Manuel Puig, the late Argentine author of "Kiss of the Spiderwoman," often showed a playful disdain for narrative conventions. In "Tropical Night Falling," his last book, he disposed of narrative voice altogether, crafting an elegiac pastiche of dialogue, personal letters, police reports and newspaper articles.Although this kind of shifting, disconnected point of view can acquire a rambling or incidental quality, at its best the novel is grandly cinematic and moving, a triumph of atmosphere and invention.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 7, 2002
NEXT TO OAFS who use cell phones in movie theaters, telemarketers are the most annoying people in the world. But there are ways to minimize their intrusion into your life. One of them is to use the same technology they use to annoy you. For a year now, a $40 gadget called the TeleZapper has been a hot seller (www.telezapper. com) among the telemarketer-weary. It works by fooling the predictive dialing software that telemarketers use into thinking your phone number has been disconnected.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
Steve Black, this one is for you. The U.S. Census Bureau tells us what we already suspected about Maryland: The state is crawling with women. Ninety-three men for every 100 women - among the lowest ratios in the country. Talk about a seller's market, Steve. Consider yourself the 94th single man in this equation. Now go forth into dating with the knowledge the odds are in your favor. Don't worry your head about the math, just sit back and watch your social life explode. Feel the ratio.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
A former public defender pleaded guilty yesterday to two counts of perjury and one count of theft in a case in which he stole more than $114,000 from an elderly, learning-disabled man for whom he was financial guardian. David R. Eaton, 63, a public defender until he retired about a week before being disbarred in July, was sentenced by Baltimore Circuit Judge Stuart R. Berger to three years in prison, which the judge suspended, and to two years of unsupervised probation. He was ordered to pay $4,571.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakeand her allies on the city's Board of Estimates today voted down a $7.4 million contract with IBM for switching city offices to voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) phones because she believes there needs to be greater coordination between the Municipal Telephone Exchange, which is part of Comptroller Joan Pratt's office, and the Mayor's Office of Information Technology. And who could argue that isn't needed? Switching the phone system could save the city millions of dollars a year, but doing so without the significant participation of the workers who maintain Baltimore's computer network could lead to costly mistakes.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Mario Armstrong is all about making connections. As a technology commentator on NBC's "Today" show, CNN and NPR, among others, the Baltimore native knows how to effortlessly translate high-tech topics for low-tech audiences. Early in his career, he was the first chief technology advocate in Baltimore City government for then-Mayor Martin O'Malley. Amid his national gigs, the Emmy Award-winner also hosts "The Digital Cafe" on WYPR. Despite his expertise, when it comes to travel, Armstrong doesn't exactly have a teleport.
NEWS
By Arianna Huffington | January 13, 2012
Given that the country is facing huge problems and still digging out from the worst financial crisis since the Depression, some might expect that the seemingly endless debates and breathless saturation of media coverage of it all would converge into a real discussion of our major problems. But only if they haven't been paying attention. Though the country is sorely in need of solutions, and the public hungry for real debate, that's not what was served up in Iowa or New Hampshire -- either by the candidates or the vast pack of media covering their every word.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2010
Cynthia Brooks is not about to let a recession, dwindling donations or a disconnected phone stop her from helping the needy. The executive director of the Bea Gaddy Family Center in East Baltimore is keeping the doors open and moving forward with plans to serve Thanksgiving dinner to 50,000 people despite the center's financial woes. The center, founded by Brooks' mother, the late city councilwoman, is barely meeting the ever increasing demand for help. The floor-to-ceiling shelves for canned goods are often empty, and the leased refrigerated containers, which were mostly bare, are gone because the center couldn't afford them.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 29, 2010
Anyone who has spent significant time observing the dockets in the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City has noticed some changes over the years: The police officers don't know the prosecutors as well as they used to, and vice-versa; police officers and witnesses frequently fail to appear, and when that happens, cases are more often dropped or put on the inactive docket than they are postponed for another day. In the last 20 years of...
NEWS
May 20, 2010
A good indication of the disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street is shown by the stock listings in the "Business Maryland" section. The list of most widely held stocks contains the names of businesses that many American know and have in their IRA/401(k) retirement accounts. But that's not where the action seems to be on Wall Street. More than half of the stocks on the list of most active stocks have unintelligible names. For example, "SPDR Fncl XLF", "iShEMktsEEM," and "iShR2K IWM" are among the most active stocks on the list.
NEWS
November 1, 1994
Jamie Butcher, 34, a severely brain-damaged man at the center of a right-to-die case, died Saturday at his parents' home in White Bear Lake, Minn., 11 days after his feeding tube was disconnected. He had been in a vegetative state since the car he was driving slammed into a tree 17 years ago. Although he sometimes opened his eyes and moved, he could not see or hear. A county court gave his parents, Pattie and Jim Butcher, permission to disconnect his feeding tube, overruling objections from groups representing disabled people.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano | February 4, 1992
Don Hardesty sits behind the L-shaped desk in his Rosedale office and tries to connect with the latest disconnected kid.This particular kid, 17-year-old Donte Hopewell, has just been suspended from Kenwood High School in Essex for drug possession. Now, like hundreds of kids before him, he has come to Mr. Hardesty for help in completing school and finding a job.Mr. Hardesty doesn't take long to read the kid: quiet, socially awkward, with a reticence that conceals anger or confusion, or both.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
If you thought there are few surprises left, here's one: In Maryland, you don't need to be divorced to be forced to pay alimony. So says Maryland's second-highest court. And just in case you're ready to accuse these judges of being activists bent on rewriting the law, history and common sense, the unanimous decision handed down late last month is steeped in historical precedent. Steeped in so much precedent, in fact, that the judges had to go back three centuries to references in English common law. Turns out that in 1777, when the Free State first started hearing cases involving alimony - or, as the current court put it, "simply a fancy name for separate maintenance" - this state's judges did not copy the ecclesiastical courts of England as closely as perhaps they should have.
NEWS
October 16, 2009
Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration released the results of its survey of Baltimore residents Thursday and confirmed two things that should be fairly obvious to most people who live here. One, illegal drug use and violent crime are major concerns of city residents, as is the difficulty of finding good jobs. And two, Baltimore is a Balkanized place. Residents reported a curious disconnect between how they felt about their neighborhoods and how they felt about the city as a whole, particularly when it comes to crime.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.