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By Scott Martelle and Scott Martelle,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2002
SEATTLE - It's flashback time in the land of Jimi Hendrix on the opening of what is believed to be the first serious exhibit of a musical and social phenomenon that, for better or worse, largely defined the '70s. Disco: A Decade of Saturday Nights runs through May 26 at Experience Music Project, a jury-rigged rock 'n' roll museum in the thin shadow of the Space Needle. The exhibit seeks to lend disco the dignity it failed to attain during its heyday. "Disco at its inception was an underground phenomenon, and it became more mainstream than any pop style before or since," said San Francisco music critic Barry Walter, an adviser to the exhibit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Emma Schkloven and For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
With a decade-long career that has survived several member departures and includes four stylistically different albums, Panic! at the Disco and its musical trajectory have been anything but ordinary. Sunday night's wide-ranging show at Pier Six Pavilion reflected the emo-turned-alternative-rock trio's unpredictable career. Following two opening acts (Magic Man and Walk the Moon), Panic! hit the stage with high-energy tracks (“Vegas Lights,” “Time to Dance”). The heat of the summer night led to a quick and necessary costume change for frontman and multi-instrumentalist Brendon Urie.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Emma Schkloven and For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
With a decade-long career that has survived several member departures and includes four stylistically different albums, Panic! at the Disco and its musical trajectory have been anything but ordinary. Sunday night's wide-ranging show at Pier Six Pavilion reflected the emo-turned-alternative-rock trio's unpredictable career. Following two opening acts (Magic Man and Walk the Moon), Panic! hit the stage with high-energy tracks (“Vegas Lights,” “Time to Dance”). The heat of the summer night led to a quick and necessary costume change for frontman and multi-instrumentalist Brendon Urie.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Danielle Young, 33, grew up in Bel Air. She is a project manager for Leidos, a government contractor in Columbia. Her parents, Sylvia and Earl Young, live in Bel Air. His story: William Kelly, 31, grew up in Torrington, Conn. He moved to Maryland in 2005 and is a chief systems engineer for the federal government. His parents, Charlotte and Michael Kelly, live in Torrington. Their story: In October 2010, Danielle and William were at Looney's Pub in Canton, watching a New York Giants game separately — she was upstairs with her friends and he was downstairs with his. During halftime, Danielle went downstairs and ran into a friend who was there with William.
NEWS
By By Sam Sessa | The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2010
One Halloween, when singer Robin Gibbens was 6 or 7, he couldn't decide whether he wanted to be disco icon Andy Gibb or KISS guitarist Ace Frehley. In a move that would later prove prophetic, Gibbens opted to be both. "I ended up making my dad buy me an Andy Gibb and an Ace Frehley costume," Gibbens said. "I went out that year with Ace Frehley's outfit and an Andy Gibb mask ... Ace Gibb." These days, Gibbens is still mixing hard rock and disco, albeit in a more kitschy way. Gibbens is the lead singer of Tragedy, the world's premier all-metal Bee Gees tribute band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | September 22, 2005
It's something I do from time to time when I'm either bored or stressed out: I go to my own disco. The ambience - pretty people, swirling lights, mirrored balls - is all imaginary. But the music is real. I just crank up the surround-sound speakers and dance and sweat around the living room. My best friend worries about me. She says I should get out and do this more often in real clubs among real people - you know, mix; be social. I get out to clubs when I'm the mood. But I often have more fun in my own boogie wonderland.
FEATURES
By Janis Campbell | October 11, 1999
The Yak found this gem of an idea in "Reader's Digest Tricks & Treats: The Ultimate Halloween Book" by Deborah Harding. It looks like Cinderella's coach. It also reminds the Yak of a disco ball. Yeah, baby, it's a disco pumpkin!What you need:* A nicely rounded pumpkin* Gold and/or silver metallic floral spray paint (sold at craft stores)* 1 package of glitter* 1 package of fake jewels* Craft or school glueWhat to do:1. Wash your pumpkin and dry it carefully with a soft cloth or paper towel.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 17, 1998
THERE COMES A time when you have to get physical with your fluorescent lights, when you have to slap them around. I found this out when the fluorescent light in the laundry room went disco on me. This once calm and steady source of illumination suddenly turned hyper. It flickered, producing the kind of intermittent, strobe-effect lighting found in disco-dance joints and in secret-police interrogation rooms.After spending a few minutes under the annoying light, I was willing to confess to any offense (Yes, I voted for bond amendments without reading them!
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2000
IT'S ANOTHER example of life coming full circle. Beginning Monday, John "Kinderman" Taylor, who swears that "disco is not dead," will teach ballroom and disco dancing lessons at Slayton House. Taylor, 64, stars in the children's television program "It's Kindertime," which airs Saturday mornings on WMAR-TV (Channel 2). Next year, he hopes to gain national attention through syndication of his show. "I want to get to a point where people know me, and I can teach techniques for movement and music and relaxing and leaving love with the children," Taylor said.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 28, 1998
It's understandable that Studio 54 would inspire a spate of books and movies. The legendary New York nightclub came to define the excesses, self-indulgence, self-destruction and, yes, the fun of the late 1970s and early 1980s.Populated by movie stars, models and now-forgotten glitterati, all of whom throbbed in a drug-induced paroxysm of ecstasy to an infectious disco beat, the super-boite of the Me Decade is ideal fodder for a movie."54" is not that movie. "Boogie Nights" was more audaciously stylish; Whit Stillman's "The Last Days of Disco" had more heart.
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
See who ruled during disco's last big summer, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "She Believes in Me," Kenny Rogers The Gambler? In 1979? At his peak. About as far from disco as one gets, "She Believes in Me" was a No. 1 country hit and written by Steve Gibb (unrelated to the Bee Gees Gibbs). 9. "Shake Your Body" (Down to the Ground)," the Jacksons The Jacksons' best disco-era effort. 8. "Chuck E.'s In Love," Rickie Lee Jones Jones' biggest hit (she would go on to win the Best New Artist Grammy in January 1980)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Singing nuns have always proved irresistible. There was the Belgian sensation who made "Dominique" a chart-topper in the 1960s, Today, there's Sister Cristina Scuccia, the Sicilian star of Italian TV and YouTube who belts out Alicia Keys songs, and the sweet-voiced, Missouri-based Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, whose CDs of Gregorian chant are best-sellers. And coming to Baltimore this week are some very vocal nuns who get into the habit of shaking up church services at Queen of Angels Cathedral in Philadelphia with the help of high-voltage songs.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Fans of Annapolis native and longtime local leading man David Bosley-Reynolds can catch his Olympian performance as Zeus along with his dual role as solid businessman Danny Maguire in Toby's Baltimore Dinner Theatre's area premiere of "Xanadu. " Always charismatic — beginning with the Chesapeake Music Hall, the Annapolis dinner theater that closed in 2004 — Bosley-Reynolds' memorable performances included his nuanced characterization of Jud in "Oklahoma," his Cowardly Lion in "The Wizard of Oz," his Tevye in "Fiddler on the Roof" and his Fred Graham in "Kiss Me Kate" — the final Music Hall performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Peter Falk had a fine career on the stage and in feature films. His crazed comic performance in "The In-Laws" alone would guarantee a major appreciation from film critics and scholars. But it is his network television work in the 1970s as a modest, sly, stub-of-a-cigar-smoking detective in a well-worn wreck of a trench coat for which he will be fondly remembered and celebrated for years to come. Falk, who died at his Beverly Hills home Thursday at age 83, gave life to a fictional detective named Lt. Columbo who was and is one of the only American crime solving characters who can rival the best in British detective fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | sam.sessa@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 4, 2010
Have you heard the one about the woman with the ham in the grocery store? It goes like this: A portly woman wearing an overcoat is walking down a supermarket aisle when a full-size ham falls out of her coat and lands on the floor. Fearing she'd be caught shoplifting, the woman looks around and yells, "Who threw that ham at me?" The story, which has gone around for years, was the basis for the new single by B-52s frontman Fred Schneider. Schneider filmed the music video for the song "Who Threw That Ham At Me?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
One Halloween, when singer Robin Gibbens was 6 or 7, he couldn't decide whether he wanted to be disco icon Andy Gibb or KISS guitarist Ace Frehley. In a move that would later prove prophetic, Gibbens opted to be both. "I ended up making my dad buy me an Andy Gibb and an Ace Frehley costume," Gibbens said. "I went out that year with Ace Frehley's outfit and an Andy Gibb mask ... Ace Gibb." These days, Gibbens is still mixing hard rock and disco, albeit in a more kitschy way. Gibbens is the lead singer of Tragedy, the world's premier all-metal Bee Gees tribute band.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
DOWNTOWN LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Disco lives on the Storgata, Lillehammer's Bourbon Street on ice.But the polyester suits have been replaced by ski pants and sweaters. Donna Summer is no longer big, but John Travolta will never be forgotten.Ah, ah, ah, ah, stayin' alive, stayin' alive. . . ."Disco is big, especially among the older men who are divorced or single," said Adelheid Wiegand, 20, of Lillehammer. "What are the best pickup lines? There have been no pickup lines since the Olympics started.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Natalia Tarnawiecki and Hector Tobar and Natalia Tarnawiecki,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2002
LIMA, Peru - A fire-juggling act in a dangerously crowded nightclub went awry early yesterday and ignited a blaze that left at least 24 people dead and dozens more injured. Most of the people who perished were young adults who died of asphyxiation as they tried to flee the flames at Utopia, an unlicensed disco that had been built recently and that didn't have fire alarms, sprinklers or properly marked emergency exits, authorities said. The fire started about 3 a.m. and spread quickly through the four-story disco in the Surco district of Lima.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 10, 2008
Donna Summer With her sassy lyrics and brassy sound, Donna Summer rose to the top during the disco era, winning Grammys and racking up hits. Her singles "Bad Girls" and "She Works Hard For the Money" became anthems for women in the '70s, and after the debut of Crayons in May, she hopes to get a whole new generation grooving to her music. The Queen of Disco takes the stage at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Pier Six Pavilion, 731 Eastern Ave. Tickets are $29-$75. Call 410-783-4189 or go to piersixpavilion.
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