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SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | October 10, 2008
Cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones won't be disciplined by the Dallas Cowboys for a scuffle with his bodyguard that team owner Jerry Jones said resulted from joking banter that got out of hand and was quickly settled. "They were literally kidding each other," Jerry Jones said yesterday. "They were jiving around ... and all of a sudden one of them started saying some things, and here you go." Dallas police were called to an upscale downtown hotel because of the disturbance late Tuesday night.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2007
In 10 years of fatherhood, I've often observed parent-child relationships in public, in part to gauge how other adults dole out discipline and set boundaries. Some of what I've seen out in the open makes me cringe at the thought of what might be going on behind closed doors. Never mind the preschooler in the department store who hauled back and slapped his mother twice after she vowed not to buy a coveted toy. Or the father in church who just sat there while his toddler dashed up and down the aisle, bumping into parishioners and nearly knocking over chairs.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY .. and LIZ F. KAY ..,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
The 11 newest cadets in Patapsco High School's U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps have their reasons for enrolling. Some said they want discipline, and a few said they have friends in the program or need a way to stay busy. Others have military aspirations. One girl added that she likes the uniform. Even more students could get the chance to sign up next fall. Given the level of interest among local middle and elementary school children, school officials want to hire another retired military officer to expand Patapsco's JROTC program from about 105 to 160 students.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1996
The Baltimore Convention Center's deputy director has abruptly resigned, claiming that he's been stonewalled in repeated attempts to root out incompetence and improve service at the expanded center.Jim Kelley, who quit last Friday, said yesterday that he had become increasingly frustrated by what he called Director Peggy Daidakis' mismanagement of the center, particularly her refusal to make mid-level managers more accountable for results.Kelley, who came to the center as deputy in July 1995, said he had insisted on the dismissals of at least a half dozen of 18 key supervisors for "gross incompetence."
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
Kara Brosmer was looking for a school activity to get involved in when she entered Mount Hebron as a freshman. Despite never running before or playing many sports while growing up, she turned to cross country. Now, she is a senior leader for the Vikings. Brosmer said the discipline and dedication required for cross country have helped her in other areas, particularly in the classroom, where she maintains a B average. Along with cross country, Brosmer has been on the varsity outdoor track and field team the past two seasons, specializing in the two-mile event.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
Responding to complaints that black Baltimore police officers are treated more harshly than their white colleagues when charged with misconduct, the city's police chief is vowing to make changes to ensure "equal discipline for equal infractions."Last week, members of the City Council and several current and former black officers accused Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier of tolerating a double-standard in how black and white officers are disciplined.Yesterday, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke agreed that the department has a problem and put Frazier on notice that he needs to do more -- and do it quickly.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and Suzanne Wooton and M. William Salganik and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1998
Bill Jews, the 6-foot-7 freshman basketball star from Cambridge, sat alone on the top row of the upper deck at Memorial Stadium watching the fifth game of the 1970 World Series.His eyes were riveted on Brooks Robinson and Mike Cuellar, yet he pondered his future, wondering how he could leap from a small school in Cambridge to the academic rigors at the Johns Hopkins University -- and also play basketball."I came down out of the stadium, walked over to the gym and told my coach I will play, but not my freshman year," he said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - Responding to growing pressure over Enron's collapse, the head of the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed yesterday to have a group of outside experts discipline accountants rather than relying on the industry to police itself. Harvey L. Pitt, SEC chairman, said antiquated rules on corporate disclosure and accounting ethics had allowed investors to suffer from a series of auditing lapses over the past decade. "We simply cannot afford a system like the present one that facilitates failure rather than success," he said at a news conference yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Lini S. Kadaba and Lini S. Kadaba,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 28, 1999
Call it the discipline wars. On one side stand no-nonsense parents, as firm as Patton, refusing to excuse misbehavior as child's play, and meting out punishment from an arsenal that includes grounding, curtailment of privileges, additional chores, even a good spanking.The traditionalists, as they like to call themselves, rail against parents such as Karen Gatewood of Bucks County, Pa., who has twin 3-year-old girls.Gatewood, 30, once spanked and called "time out." Now, she talks about her children's feelings.
NEWS
By Pat Montley | May 23, 2013
There were giants in those days. And some of them were only five feet tall. With her wide serge sleeves rolled brazenly beyond her elbows and a shiny baton in each hand, she stood at the edge of the St. Bernardine's School stage in West Baltimore in the spring of 1950, and - indifferent to our rehearsal fatigue - narrowed her eyes under the starched white headband and challenged us for the umpteenth time: "Again!" Once more we twirled our batons in sync three times, then threw them in the air and … up, up … down, down … thump, thump, thump, thump.
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