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NEWS
August 9, 2013
The author of the op-ed "The paradox of lowering standards" (August 5) may understand statistics, but he fails to grasp the purpose of the new school discipline regulations under consideration by the Maryland State Board of Education. The board's proposed discipline code aims to make sure that all children, of all races, get educated. Every day a child is suspended is a day that child misses a chance to learn - and more than 50,000 Maryland children are suspended or expelled annually.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Morgan State football coach Lee Hull has been seeing a little bit too much yellow for his liking. The Bears (2-2, 1-0 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) nipped league rival Howard, 38-35, on Saturday, but not without drawing 10 penalties costing them 104 yards. It marked the third time this season that Morgan State incurred more penalties than its opponent. The team is averaging 8.5 penalties per game for an average loss of 77.5 yards. “I'm real concerned because that shows a lack of focus and a lack of discipline,” Hull said this week.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
Throughout Super Bowl week, players have been asked to comment on the NFL's disciplinary system and the attempt by the commissioner's office to reduce the violent hits that most often lead to injuries. Most of them have been critical of the league's inability to separate intentional flagrant hits and those that happen inadvertently ... or even because of the actions of the offensive player. “This is something we have seen, an escalation in the discipline, because we are trying to take these techniques out of the game," NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said at a news conference Friday night.
SPORTS
Susan Reimer | September 17, 2014
Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson has been charged in Texas with felony child abuse for allegedly beating his 4-year-old son so badly with a switch that it left welts, bruises and cuts on his back, buttocks, legs and scrotum and defensive wounds on his hands. The child received the "whooping" from his father after fussing with another young child over a video game, and we are asked to accept this method of discipline and this level of injury as a cultural difference between black parents and white parents or between Southern parents and Northern parents, or between rural parents and urban parents, between parents of 40 years ago and parents of today or between rich parents and poor parents.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
Kudos to your reporters for exposing reality as it exists in many schoolhouses ( "Painful lessons: Run-ins with students take toll on teachers, city finances," Feb. 16). I realize this expose is part of a long range look into workman's compensation, but to many readers the revelations are like Upton Sinclair's novel, The Jungle about the meatpacking industry, where the author famously said, "I aimed at their hearts, but hit their stomachs instead. " The riotous conditions existing in many classrooms have been hushed for years.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
State school board members still don't know her name, but a Dorchester County girl who was denied access to an education for a year is the pivotal figure in their push to abandon long-held zero-tolerance discipline policies across Maryland. The 15-year-old's suspension for fighting drew little attention at the time. But it so angered board members that they launched a statewide review of discipline policies. This month, the board is expected to propose regulations that would keep students, even those with behavior problems, in school as much as possible.
NEWS
By Staff Report | February 4, 1993
The county school board has voted to form a committee to study alternatives to suspension and expulsion of students.During yesterday's regular meeting, board members received a report on discipline in schools that showed that during the 1991-1992 academic year, 53,765 referrals were written on students for a range of offenses including fighting, insubordination, use of foul language, and truancy.More than 5,300 students also were suspended during the same period and 282 were expelled.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
A recent article by staff writer Lan Nguyen reported on the preponderance of school suspensions given black students, particularly males. Nationally, black students were suspended in 1992 at three times the rate of whites. In Maryland, the gap was sometimes wider: In Harford and Howard counties, black students were suspended almost five times as often as non-blacks; in Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Carroll counties, blacks were punished at least twice as often.The good news: Educators have recognized a problem that needs to be addressed.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
Will kids learn and behave better if they're wearing neatly pressed slacks and a cardigan instead of baggy jeans and a t-shirt with some crude slogan? Five Anne Arundel County elementaries that want to experiment with school uniforms think it's a possibility worth exploring; so do we.The Anne Arundel Board of Education has nothing to lose by letting these schools try uniforms on a pilot basis. The program won't cost tax dollars, because parents would pay for the uniforms and a plan is being developed to assist those in financial need.
NEWS
September 28, 1993
Why are African-American students being suspended more often than whites in Howard County elementary schools? School officials have been picking at that thorny question as they search for ways to curb this dilemma.The raw figures aren't immense: Only 46 out of about 19,000 elementary school students were suspended last year. But 52 percent were black, even though African-American children accounted for only 14 percent of the county's elementary school population.After two years of unsuccessful efforts -- during which the suspension rate for blacks in elementary schools actually increased -- administrators are turning their focus away from the children causing the problems and directing attention instead on how teachers may be provoking bad behavior.
NEWS
Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
One Towson University student drank so much alcohol he was unable to speak and threw up "without a pause" before passing out outside a nearby apartment complex, according to an anguished email his mother sent to university officials. Another student attempted to drink a bottle of Southern Comfort and ended up in the hospital with a blood alcohol content of 0.34 percent, a level that's life-threatening. In 2012, a rugby club member was so intoxicated he told a dormitory resident assistant that the year was 1993.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced sweeping changes to the NFL personal-conduct policy Thursday, writing in a letter to NFL owners obtained by The Baltimore Sun that discipline for domestic violence incidents will increase significantly. The NFL will suspend first-time offenders for six games. A second violation would result in a lifetime ban, though players could file for reinstatement after one year. "Violations of the Personal Conduct Policy regarding assault, battery, domestic violence and sexual assault that involve physical force will be subject to enhanced discipline," Goodell wrote in the letter.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
When Ray Rice received a two-game suspension from the NFL last week for a fight in which he knocked his wife unconscious, many were quick to compare it to harsher penalties handed down for other players' lesser infractions. In 2008, New York Giant Plaxico Burress was suspended for twice as long for accidentally shooting himself in his leg. Josh Gordon of the Cleveland Browns now faces a season-long exile for marijuana use. The disparity again thrust the NFL's disciplinary system into the spotlight.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell on Friday defended the two-game suspension he handed down to Ravens running back Ray Rice, saying it was consistent with previous punishments in domestic violence incidents. “We have to remain consistent,” Goodell told reporters while in Canton, Ohio, for Pro Football Hall of Fame weekend. “We can't just make up the discipline. It has to be consistent with other cases, and it was.” Goodell's comments were his first on the subject since the NFL announced Rice's discipline July 24. In addition to being suspended for two games, Rice was fined $529,000.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The recent death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child at an Anne Arundel County group home was just the latest in a series of problems at LifeLine, the state contractor that has been paid millions in taxpayer funds to care for "medically fragile" individuals, a two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun has found. Even before Damaud Martin's death on July 2, LifeLine had struggled for years to provide around-the-clock care for its residents - adults and foster children often confined to a bed or wheelchair by paralysis, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Having surrendered 9.2 goals per game this spring, No. 9 Johns Hopkins ranks just outside of the top third in Division I in defense, and the team has aided that effort by staying out of the penalty box. Against the Blue Jays (6-3), opponents have had just 19 extra-man opportunities, which is the least allowed by any team in the country. At this rate, the team is poised to finish the season giving up just a shade under 30 extra-man chances, which would mark a program low since at least 2002.
NEWS
March 15, 1995
With stiff competition for limited money in the education budget, from classroom supplies to new buildings, it might seem like a mistake for the Carroll County Board of Education to ask for funds to staff "timeout" discipline rooms in 10 schools.Suspend the troublemakers and let them and their parents deal with the consequences, rather than burdening the school budget, would be one hard-line response.That reasoning, however, misses the point that schools have always had to deal with problem pupils whose behavior does not justify the more drastic suspension-expulsion process.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - At age 20, Delmon Young was the top prospect in the game - a former No. 1 overall pick in a hurry to make his mark in the major leagues. But these days, after eight years in the big leagues, Young is definitely more patient with the process. Most veterans dread the hours spent on bus rides throughout Florida during spring training, but that's no problem for Young now that he's finally healthy following nearly three years of essentially playing on one leg. "It's actually fun," Young said.
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