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NEWS
May 12, 1998
Neighbors of Francis Scott Key High School are appealing a decision allowing the school to discharge effluent from a new septic waste treatment plant to a tributary of Little Pipe Creek.The Maryland Department of the Environment approved a permit in April for the school to discharge up to 17,000 gallons of treated effluent daily into the unnamed stream.Bark Hill Road residents protested at a January public hearing that they should have been notified individually of the school system's plan.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was discharged from the University of Maryland Medical Center Sunday, where she had been since experiencing chest pains and shortness of breath Saturday night at the Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Fort McHenry. Doctors performed what the mayor's aides described as "a series of tests to assess her medical condition" before releasing her. She spent less than 24 hours at the hospital and has cancelled her public appearances for Monday. After her release, Rawlings-Blake said she had pushed herself "a bit too hard" amid the celebrations to mark the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 21, 2003
After years of legal battles, Carroll County has won approval to increase the discharge from its Hampstead wastewater treatment plant - but only if it keeps the effluent from getting too warm. The decision Tuesday, from the Maryland Department of the Environment, raises the possibility that the county could have to spend millions of dollars to chill the discharge to the required 68 degrees. It also requires the county to monitor the normal temperature of Piney Run, a stream whose name changes to Western Run in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
A man fired a handgun on South Charles Street in Federal Hill amid a fight that happened after the bars closed early Saturday morning, according to police. The gun, a 9MM Ekol Volga, is thought to be a "blank gun" that makes a sound like a gun but does not fire a bullet, according to an email sent by Southern Police District Commander Major Ian Dombroski, Commander of the Southern Police District, to the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association. The gun still needs to undergo ballistics testing to confirm that, he wrote.
NEWS
August 8, 1999
A Wal-Mart in Catonsville closed yesterday evening after pepper spray was discharged in the store. Eight customers were treated at the scene for skin and eye irritation.Baltimore County police and fire personnel were called to the store at 6205 Baltimore National Pike about 6: 15 p.m. None of the injured customers sought further medical treatment, police said.Police have no suspects in the incident. The store was expected to reopen today, police said.
NEWS
July 20, 1994
The Maryland Department of the Environment will hold a public hearing Aug. 11 on Browning-Ferris Industries' application to discharge treated water from its Solley Road hazardous waste landfill into an intermittent stream that leads to Marley Creek.The hearing, a continuation of one held in June, will be at 2:30 p.m. in the fire station at Solley and Fort Smallwood roads in Riviera Beach. The agency planned the hearing because it did not properly notify people of the earlier hearing.Protective environmental measures are failing at the Solley Road landfill, closed since 1982.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Despite neighbors' objections, the state Department of the Environment has issued a permit to allow school officials to discharge treated septic waste into a local stream.The permit allows the school system to discharge up to 17,000 gallons of treated effluent daily from Francis Scott Key High School into an unnamed tributary of Little Pipe Creek.Replacement of the inadequate 40-year-old septic system is part of a $16.3 million expansion and renovation of the high school, which began in the fall.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
A plan to discharge treated sewage from Francis Scott Key High School onto a nearby dairy farm was unveiled before Carroll County commissioners yesterday by a New Windsor consultant.The commissioners immediately lauded the idea of David T. Duree, president of Advance Systems, as an inexpensive way to correct a costly error by the county Board of Education. The school board built the $800,000 wastewater treatment plant last year to replace its aging septic system, but failed to obtain state construction and discharge permits.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
Several Baltimore County and Carroll County residents raised concerns yesterday about Carroll's request to nearly double the amount of discharge from the Hampstead Wastewater Treatment Plant into a nearby stream.Carroll has asked the Maryland Department of the Environment to permit the Hampstead facility to increase its discharge from 500,000 gallons per day to 900,000 gallons per day to accommodate growth in the Hampstead area. County officials said the increased discharge has been part of that region's master plan.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
Villa Julie College can receive a state permit to discharge treated sewage water into a stream that intermittently feeds the Jones Falls, a state administrative law judge has ruled.The decision is the latest in a series of rulings that have allowed the private, four-year institution to proceed with plans to expand at its location in the semi-rural Green Spring Valley over opposition from neighbors.Baltimore County has authorized an amendment to its water and sewer master plan permitting the college to build a waste water treatment plant to replace a failing septic system.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Federal regulators approved new pollution limits Monday for Maryland's coastal bays aimed at restoring water quality in the shallow lagoons that serve both as playground for Ocean City vacationers and vital habitat for fish and wildlife. Like the Chesapeake Bay, the state's coastal bays suffer from an overdose of nitrogen and phosphorus, which feed algae blooms and stress fish by depleting levels of dissolved oxygen in the water. The bays have been officially recognized as impaired by nutrient pollution since the mid-1990s.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
For every gunshot report taken by Baltimore police, there could be four more they haven't heard about, according to the company behind a high-tech system that city officials hope will help curb the illegal use of firearms. ShotSpotter, which recognizes the sound of gunfire and alerts police, analyzed its data from 48 cities, covering 165 square miles, and found people called 911 to report shots fired in fewer than 1 in 5 events where the system confirmed the discharging of a gun. "We're showing the real inconvenient truth of gun violence, in that it happens more frequently than people are aware," said Ralph Clark, the CEO of SST Inc., which manufactures ShotSpotter.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
A 17-year-old boy was shot in the neck Saturday night while a group of friends were handing a weapon in White Marsh, Baltimore County police said. The injured boy was treated at a local hospital for non-life threatening injuries, according to police. Around 9:45 p.m. Saturday, police responded to the 6000 block of St. Regis Road after a report of shooting. Officers found that a group of juveniles had been handling a gun in a basement when the weapon discharged and wounded the 17-year-old, police said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2013
A Howard County police officer who was shot and wounded by a suspect who has since been captured has been released from the hospital, police said Sunday. Steven Houk, 30, a two-year veteran of the department, was seriously wounded after being shot on the job last week in North Laurel. He was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for his injuries. Police say Stephon Prather, 29, opened fire on Houk and two other officers who went to investigate after employees at a CarMax on Route 1 reported Prather acting suspiciously.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
A veteran Baltimore County police officer has been charged with failing to secure a firearm after his 11-year-old son handled his service weapon, firing it into a bedroom door, according to the department. Officer Timothy Kennedy's son grabbed his father's gun he had left on an armoire in his bedroom and discharged the gun into a bedroom door on Oct.11, police said. No one was injured, but Kennedy's wife reported the incident to the department the next day, prompting an investigation.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore launched an incentive program this week to encourage nurses to discharge more patients by noon, prompting questions about patient safety. The program sets a goal for nursing units to discharge 20 percent of their patients by noon and offers the nurse on each unit with the most early discharges a $10 gift card. An executive with LifeBridge Health, which owns Sinai, said the goals were taken out of context. The hospital was responding to patient concerns that they wanted to leave the hospital sooner after procedures, said Debbie Hollenstein, LifeBridge vice president of marketing.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1997
An 18-year-old female Army recruit, a key accuser in the investigation of sexual misconduct by drill instructors at Aberdeen Proving Ground, has been granted a hardship discharge from the Army Ordnance Center and School, APG officials confirmed yesterday.A request for the discharge by Pvt. Jessica Bleckley -- who said on a national news program in November that she had been pressured into having sex with two drill sergeants at the military base -- is being processed by the Army and should be completed Monday, said APG spokeswoman Rachel McDonald.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A U.S. Army soldier who refused to wear the blue insignia of the United Nations has declined his commander's offer of administrative punishment, opening the way for a possible court-martial or his discharge.Spc. Michael New appeared before Lt. Col. Stephen Layfield, commander of the 15th Infantry Battalion, in Schweinfurt, Germany, yesterday and rejected nonjudicial punishment, a lesser form of military discipline than a court-martial.The 22-year-old medic told the officer he wanted legal representation and a public hearing, according to his legal adviser in the United States.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Eight residents and staff members of a group home in Parkville were taken to area hospitals — six of them to Maryland Shock Trauma Center — for possible chemical exposure in the home early Monday morning, according to Baltimore County fire officials. County fire officials said late Monday that they had detected carbon monoxide in the home, in the 2800 block of Hillcrest Avenue, and that it was the apparent cause of the illness. However, the fire department was unable to find the source of the carbon monoxide and said the Maryland Department of the Environment will have to investigate further.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
John Alban Jr., the driver seriously injured after his truck collided with a freight train in Rosedale last week — triggering an explosion felt around the region — was discharged from the hospital. Maryland Shock Trauma Center spokeswoman Cynthia Rivers said Monday that Alban had been discharged Sunday. The 50-year-old Essex man had been in serious condition since the crash last Tuesday. After Alban's truck struck the southbound 45-car freight train, 15 cars derailed and chemicals on board caught fire and exploded, shearing off the side of a nearby building and blowing out windows and cracking ceilings on other buildings.
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