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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
John Wendell Compton Sr., a retired disc jockey known on the air as Sir Johnny O, died of heart failure Oct. 29 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Randallstown resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised on Division Street, he was the son of Herbert Roy Compton Sr., a Baptist preacher, and Esther Mae Compton, a homemaker. He was a 1956 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He then served in the Army. He went into radio broadcasting and worked at WWRL-AM in New York and WDAS-AM radio in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
John Wendell Compton Sr., a retired disc jockey known on the air as Sir Johnny O, died of heart failure Oct. 29 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Randallstown resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised on Division Street, he was the son of Herbert Roy Compton Sr., a Baptist preacher, and Esther Mae Compton, a homemaker. He was a 1956 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He then served in the Army. He went into radio broadcasting and worked at WWRL-AM in New York and WDAS-AM radio in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
October 27, 1993
A Westminster disc jockey charged with molesting a 15-year-old boy was released from the county jail yesterday on $25,000 unsecured bond.Marc Scott Dawson, 27, of the 700 block of Eagles Court had surrendered to Westminster police Monday to answer a nine-count indictment that charged him with three counts of perverted sexual practice, two counts of attempted perverted sexual practice, three counts of fourth-degree sexual offense and one count of battery.He...
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Did you know this about Terps broadcaster Johnny Holliday? * That, according to a 2007 Baltimore Sun profile , he  has played the lead in countless productions over the years, including roles in Follies, 42nd Street, Company, The Music Man and Me and My Girl? * That, according to a 2011 press release, Holliday -- as  a disc jockey in San Francisco in 1964 -- "was an emcee for the Rol ling Stones  first headlining show in the U.S. In New York a few years later, he served as the announcer for the NBC program Hullaballoo, a brief competitor to ABCs American Bandstand.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 24, 2007
Disc jockey Johnny Dark is on the air five hours a day, seven days a week -- but don't try listening in the U.S. He is now on WorldSpace satellite radio and commutes to its Silver Spring studio three times a week from his Reisterstown home. At last count, he is heard in 132 countries around the globe. "I get e-mails from Qatar and sunny South Africa," he said yesterday about his music and his program, The Hop, which features songs of the 1950s through the early 1970s. "There are no commercials, and I find myself educating people about the oldies.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 22, 2007
Jack Edwards' voice filled the nights on Baltimore AM radio for decades when he was a disc jockey during the golden years of rock 'n' roll. Now 69, Edwards can't let go of the music he loves. Technically retired, he keeps his hand on the 45-rpm record player Friday nights at Tully's restaurant in Putty Hill and spins the vinyl platters he has been collecting since he was a student at Kenwood Senior High School. "I want them dancing. Why play a song that nobody can dance to?" he said the other day from his Reisterstown home.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | May 4, 1991
A WMIX-FM disc jockey whose regular nighttime program featured listeners' dedications of love songs was killed yesterday when a gun he was holding accidentally fired, the Baltimore police said.Mark Douglas Edmondson, 24, died of a single gunshot wound to the neck just before 7 a.m. in his basement apartment in the 6900 block of Harford Road, said Dennis S. Hill, a police spokesman.Mr. Hill said Mr. Edmondson's accidental shooting was witnessed by a childhood friend, Robert Miller, a University of Maryland student who had been visiting at the time.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
A Carroll circuit judge yesterday sentenced a Baltimore free-lance disc jockey to 10 years in state prison without parole for cocaine distribution.Craig Long, 24, pleaded guilty yesterday to two counts of cocaine distribution as part of a deal in which prosecutors dropped 10 other charges and agreed to the 10-year sentence.Long, of the 5600 block of Haddon Ave., had been arrested by the Carroll County Narcotics Task Force three times since January. He had frequent gigs at Carroll area parties, according to court records.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | August 28, 1991
A WBGR-AM disc jockey who was taken off the air by management 12 days ago says he has been questioned by the Federal Communications Commission about his acceptance of fees to emcee concerts.Calvin Hackett, a drive-time DJ for the gospel station, said FCC investigators also questioned him at the station's offices last Friday about how the station chooses songs for airplay."They asked how songs are selected and whether I had any input into what gets on the air," said Mr. Hackett, who has been with the station for six years as an announcer and assistant program director.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | July 11, 1994
Howard High School teacher Robert Nykyforchyn spun his first crackly 45s nearly 20 years ago at a school fund-raising dance.Now the Columbia resident has hit it big as one of the area's most famous disc jockeys. There he is, on page 50 of this month's Baltimore magazine, named Charm City's best announcer.A "hometown celebrity," the magazine calls him.The 43-year-old Spanish teacher, who goes by the professional name of Bobby Nyk, is surprised the magazine bestowed the honor on him, yet exudes the confidence that he's one of the best in the business.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Dennis S. Hill, a former Baltimore City Police Department spokesman known for his mellow voice, authoritative presence and accessibility to the media, died Saturday of heart disease at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Forest Hill resident was 71. In his 22 years in the Police Department press room, Mr. Hill was his agency's day-to-day public face on television and voice on radio. He was quoted almost daily in three newspapers. He handled the press when James A. "Turk" Scott, a Maryland House of Delegates member, was murdered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Dave Hill program director at 98 Rock, said Thursday afternoon that the station had “parted ways” with afternoon disc jockey Stephen G. Smith, known to listeners as Stash. Smith has not been on the air since an automobile accident in Harford County Sunday that sent five people to the hospital for treatment of minor injuries and resulted in 48-year-old disc jockey being charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, negligent driving and other traffic offenses, according to police.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Ronald A. Stratton, who boosted ratings and transformed radio stations he managed, died of complications from a stroke June 29 at Madonna Heritage Assisted Living in Jarrettsville. He was 72 and lived in Red Lion, Pa. Born in Detroit, he broke into broadcasting in 1955 when his high school guidance counselor offered him credit if he would assist a local weekly children's TV show in Manton, Mich. "He wrote and typed scripts and was the cameraman," said his daughter, Barbara Stratton of Baltimore.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 3, 2012
For those who enjoy listening to R&B, jazz, gospel and other music recorded mainly by African-American musicians, being able to find it in numerous places along the radio dial is something we take for granted these days. Some of my young nieces and nephews find it hard to believe that in the early years of radio, most white station owners banned R&B recordings, or race records as they called them, on the airwaves. Although the ban had been lifted in some cities by the late 1950s, when I was growing up in The South in the 1960s, we still only heard one or two songs by African-American artists played on my local radio station, WCKM, in Winnsboro, S.C. We went to nearby Columbia several times a week where we could hear R&B on a black-owned station there, but its signal didn't reach my hometown after sundown.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 9, 2010
Ronald Thomas Leaverton, a former reporter for WBAL-TV who later became a well-known voiceover artist and a co-founder of a Timonium video production company, died Thursday of a heart attack at his Hunt Valley home. Mr. Leaverton was 64. Mr. Leaverton, the son of a Baltimore Department of Public Works engineer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Howard Park. "He always knew he wanted to be in radio," said his wife of 16 years, the former Patricia "Patty" Wise.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
Zarifa Roberson was supposed to be taking a break from studying for the law school admissions exam, clearing her head with a stop at a Barnes & Noble near her home in Philadelphia. Soon enough, the break turned into another project, a project that has now entered a new phase in Baltimore. This was the summer of 2003, and she had recently graduated from college, was studying for the LSAT and browsing the store's magazine selections. There were magazines for bikers and hikers, runners, travelers, eaters, golfers - just about every category of person one could think of, except disabled people, a group to which Roberson has belonged since she was born with a rare condition that contracts joints throughout the body, dislocates hips, locks the jaw. Roberson, who is 30 and lives in Timonium, had struggled through arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with years of painful physical therapy and many surgeries, gaining the ability to walk when she was 4. Now this magazine rack seemed to be presenting another challenge.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Mike March, a former Baltimore AM-radio disc jockey and marketing director for a beer distributor, died of a heart attack Monday at Beebe Medical Center in Lewes, Del. The Lutherville resident was 70. A fixture on stations WCBM and WFBR during the 1960s and 1970s, he had been marketing director for Bond Distributing Co. for 28 years until retiring in January. Born George Christopher Hagelios in Pittsburgh, he was raised in Allentown, Pa., where his Greek immigrant parents operated a restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Merle Rubin and Merle Rubin,Special to the Sun | December 14, 2003
Burn, Baby! Burn!: The Autobiography of Magnificient Montague, by Magnificent Montague with Bob Baker. University of Illinois Press. 232 pages. $24.95. Shouted out by the Watts rioters of 1965, the phrase "Burn, baby! Burn!" had actually gotten its start as a catchphrase used by the popular radio disc jockey known as Magnificent Montague. Then working at Los Angeles radio station KGFJ, Montague had been using the phrase to introduce records he felt were really hot. Setting fire to buildings was not what he had meant at all. Montague was talking about soul music and the joy and anguish of centuries of black American experience out of which, phoenix-like, the music arose: "All the triumph, all the hurt -- rising above all that, celebrating a moment of pure musical perfection that you can't describe but must simply bow to -- that's what I mean when I yell 'Burn, baby!
NEWS
August 4, 2009
GEORGE MORRIS Satellite radio classic rock host George Taylor Morris, formerly the daily morning host on XM Satellite Radio's "Deep Tracks" classic rock channel and the primary host of the company's interview program, "XM Artist Confidential," died Saturday of throat cancer at his home in Reston, Va. He was 62. Morris, also known as GTM, had been a disc jockey and radio personality at stations on Long Island and in Boston, New York and elsewhere when...
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
Baltimore's top-rated radio station laid off two of its morning radio personalities yesterday, saying it will replace The Big Phat Morning Show on 92Q (WERZ) with syndicated programming. Morning disc jockey Marc Clarke, who had been with the station for nine years, and producer Sonjay lost their jobs in the shake-up at the popular hip-hop, R&B station. By yesterday afternoon, their profiles had been removed from the station's Web site. A third disc jockey, Porkchop, will remain with the station in another position, said Howard Mazer, the station's vice president and general manager.
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