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Disbarred

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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho | June 19, 2009
Michael U. Gisriel, a former House of Delegates member, a real estate attorney and former Baltimore Sun columnist, was disbarred for cashing a $1,000 check belonging to his former clients. In a decision issued Thursday, the Maryland Court of Appeals said Gisriel's conduct in his client's case was exacerbated by his "hubris" in handling the check. Two judges on the state's highest court dissented and called for a suspension rather than disbarment, noting no prior disciplinary action against Gisriel, who has been a member of the Maryland Bar since 1976.
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NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Tiffany Alston, the former delegate from Prince George's County who was booted from the General Assembly last year, was disbarred Thursday. She consented to losing her license to practice law for reasons unrelated to receiving probation before judgment in criminal cases involving theft and misconduct. Last year, she was the subject of an indefinite suspension of her law license. According to the Court of Appeals order, she expressed her intent in April to disbarment. She was ordered to pay more than $7,500 to former clients.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Stanley Needleman's 30-year law career officially came to an abrupt end Thursday when the criminal defense attorney pleaded guilty to tax evasion and agreed to pay more than $1 million in penalties. The plea came four months after agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided his downtown law office and Pikesville home, finding $1.15 million in unreported income inside two safes. Agents found a ledger detailing the cash payments from his legal clients, prosecutors said. "Any businessman who receives payments in cash faces the temptation to commit similar crimes — some fall to that temptation," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein in an interview after the hearing.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
The Baltimore entertainment attorney who represented White House state dinner crashers Tareq and Michaele Salahi and "The Wire" actress Felicia "Snoop" Pearson was disbarred Monday after the state's highest court found he had, among other things, overbilled clients and misused money given to him as a retainer. The Court of Appeals upheld an earlier ruling that Paul W. Gardner II had violated official standards of conduct for lawyers, and he was ordered to pay court costs. The court ruled Gardner improperly paid his office manager for legal work, though she was not an attorney, and improperly filed a nonimmigrant work visa application, resulting in its being denied.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz | September 23, 2005
An attorney who unsuccessfully ran for Howard County state's attorney in 2002 has been disbarred from practicing law in the state. On Tuesday, the Court of Appeals ordered Robert R. Tousey, who is the subject of a pending disciplinary investigation involving the misappropriation of client and other funds, disbarred. He consented to the court's action. Tousey, who lives in Ellicott City, was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1989. He also unsuccessfully ran for public office in 1994 in an attempt to unseat 3rd District Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | September 27, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The Court of Appeals disbarred a Baltimore lawyer yesterday for misappropriating funds from two estates he was hired to represent in 1987.The court found that Jacob Friedel "failed to account for the funds" of both estates and failed to turn over assets and money to other representatives or to the Orphans' Court, which has jurisdiction over estate matters.Moreover, Mr. Friedel converted to his own use more than $184,000 from the two estates, the court ruled in ordering his disbarment.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 9, 2002
A lawyer formerly with the Law Offices of Peter G. Angelos was disbarred yesterday after judges on the Maryland Court of Appeals found that he forged signatures on bogus documents and lied to the firm about cases. Reached at home, Kenneth D. Pack, 56, of Baltimore, said he was not working now but declined to comment further. He had asked the Court of Appeals for an indefinite suspension, according to the court ruling. Mishandling cases The Angelos law firm discharged Pack after learning in August 1999 of his mishandling of several cases, according to the ruling.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1997
The state's top court has disbarred a Baltimore lawyer, saying he misused clients' money, failed to file state withholding tax for an employee and failed to pursue an appeal for a client, then tried to cover up his mistake.In taking away Kenneth Mack Williams' law license, the Court of Appeals said Thursday that the Charles Street lawyer hindered the probe into his law office accounts.The Attorney Grievance Commission argued that Williams was dishonest and untrustworthy.Williams admitted to the allegations but disagreed with those conclusions.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
Local attorney Burton M. Greenstein has been disbarred by Maryland's Court of Appeals after he became entangled in the affairs of the late Fred Kolodner, an old friend who was disbarred in 1991 for misusing client funds.Mr. Greenstein agreed to the court's Dec. 15 order barring him from practicing law in Maryland, officials of the state Attorney Grievance Commission said yesterday. But even as Mr. Greenstein, who is recuperating from heart bypass surgery, watches his legal career fade to black, the details of what he allegedly did remain unclear.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Andrea F. Siegel and Tom Pelton and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1997
The state Court of Appeals disbarred yesterday a real estate attorney and aide to former Gov. Marvin Mandel for stealing nearly $200,000 from two clients.Michael S. Silver, 52, of Baltimore was assistant appointments secretary under Mandel, who was convicted of federal mail and racketeering charges in 1977. Mandel's conviction was overturned in 1987."I am disappointed to hear about this because Michael had everything in the world going for him," said Frank A. DeFilippo, chief of staff in the Mandel administration.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
A disbarred Annapolis lawyer was ordered Thursday to serve 18 months in the Anne Arundel County jail plus five years on probation for siphoning nearly $308,000 from a client. Jerold K. Nussbaum, 60, whom Karen Gunther hired to handle her mother's estate, stole most of it in 2005 and 2006, according to prosecutors and court records. He had pleaded guilty in January. "Mr. Nussbaum not only stole my money, but I've lost my home," Gunther, the heir, told Judge Paul A. Hackner, according to a recording of the court hearing.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 12, 2011
More than six years ago, Maryland's highest court voted to disbar Ira C. Cooke, once one of Annapolis' most prominent lobbyists, because of Mr. Cooke's conviction in an embezzlement case in California. A couple of years later, that conviction was reversed by the high court of California, and prosecutors in Bakersfield decided against a retrial. So, back in Annapolis, Mr. Cooke asked the Maryland Court of Appeals to reinstate him to the bar here. According to records, Mr. Cooke made that predictable request in the court's fall term of 2007 - by the calendar I've been using, four years ago - but the Court of Appeals only ruled on the matter late last month.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
When Maxim Healthcare Services settled one of the government's largest-ever medical fraud cases last week, the Medicaid and Veterans Affairs contractor agreed to pay $150 million and implement a host of corporate reforms. But Maxim, a Columbia-based home health and medical staffing company founded by Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, avoided the penalty that would have the biggest impact on its bottom line: disbarment from federal health care programs. That's the case with nearly all of the companies ever charged with cheating government programs — including thousands of health care companies that are defendants in most of the cases and that settled civil charges for a record $2.5 billion in the 2010 fiscal year.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Stanley Needleman's 30-year law career officially came to an abrupt end Thursday when the criminal defense attorney pleaded guilty to tax evasion and agreed to pay more than $1 million in penalties. The plea came four months after agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided his downtown law office and Pikesville home, finding $1.15 million in unreported income inside two safes. Agents found a ledger detailing the cash payments from his legal clients, prosecutors said. "Any businessman who receives payments in cash faces the temptation to commit similar crimes — some fall to that temptation," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein in an interview after the hearing.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2011
Isaiah Dixon, a 55-year-old former Baltimore County prosecutor, is set to go on trial Monday on charges that he stole a car at knifepoint from two women outside a store in January 2010. Dixon, who faces 18 counts, including armed carjacking, robbery, assault, unlawful taking of a motor vehicle and drug possession, worked as an assistant state's attorney for almost eight years, until July 1997. To avoid conflicts of interest, his case is being handled by a prosecutor from the Harford County state's attorney's office, Salvatore D. Fili, although it remains in Baltimore County Circuit Court under the supervision of Judge Timothy J. Martin.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 17, 2007
RALEIGH, N.C. -- After 15 months of waging war in the Duke lacrosse case, Durham County District Attorney Michael B. Nifong surrendered his law license yesterday. Nifong gave up minutes after a state panel ruled that he had intentionally and repeatedly lied and cheated as he prosecuted three former lacrosse players on rape charges. Disbarment fit the magnitude of Nifong's offenses, said the Disciplinary Hearing Commission, which serves as judge and jury to lawyers charged with wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
A conservative legal foundation filed a formal complaint in Arkansas yesterday seeking to have President Clinton disbarred as an attorney based on "overwhelming evidence" that he repeatedly lied to cover up sexual misconduct.The Southeastern Legal Foundation of Atlanta -- long associated with such conservative causes as the fight to end affirmative action -- claims that evidence compiled in the Starr report released last week "reflect adversely on Mr. Clinton's honesty, trustworthiness or fitness as a lawyer."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2002
Thomas J. McLaughlin, the Harford County attorney accused of collecting more than $200,000 in fees for work he never performed, was disbarred yesterday in an order by the Maryland Court of Appeals. McLaughlin specialized in estate planning for elderly clients who were living in or about to enter nursing homes. He charged tens of thousands of dollars to prepare plans so that his clients could become eligible for Medicaid and keep their assets intact to spend on care or pass on to their heirs.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
RALEIGH, N.C. -- Durham County District Attorney Mike Nifong, a prosecutor for more than a quarter-century, found himself in the defendant's chair yesterday, charged by the state bar with committing ethics violations during his rape prosecution of three former Duke University lacrosse players. Leaning back in his chair, his chin on his hand, Nifong listened impassively as a North Carolina State Bar lawyer accused him of making prejudicial and misleading statements to the media, withholding exculpatory evidence and lying to two judges.
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