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February 11, 1997
The Brethren Disaster Response Leadership Conference will take place Friday through Monday at the New Windsor Conference Center, 500 Main St., New Windsor.Nearly 100 disaster relief coordinators and directors will participate. The Rev. Patrick Mellerson, whose Orangeburg, S.C., church was destroyed by fire last year, will speak at 8 p.m. Saturday. Volunteers, including members of the local disaster response team, are rebuilding the church.Information: 635-8730.FireUnion Bridge: Firefighters assisted Frederick County at 8: 36 p.m. Sunday for a chimney fire in the 13700 block of Unionville Road.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Emergency personnel will converge on Inner Harbor waters near Canton on Wednesday as part of a staged water taxi disaster, an event geared toward assessing rescue capabilities and practicing response techniques. Between 8 a.m. and noon, first responders from various federal, state and local agencies will be rescuing flotation devices and "dummies" representing casualties or adrift taxi passengers in water near the 3200 block of Boston St., the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management said.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Chris Milligan had less than two days to pack up and get himself to Port-au-Prince. "I bought some shirts, paid my bills and went," the Baltimore native says over the telephone from the Haitian capital. It was far from Milligan's first visit to a crisis zone — the U.S. Agency for International Development veteran has worked in Iraq, Zimbabwe and more than 50 other countries. Still, he says, he was struck by the devastation the January earthquake had wrought. "The scale of the destruction can't be overstated," says Milligan, 44. "It's overwhelming, even today."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Torrey Kurtzner sees the 10 months he signed up to spend at disaster sites across the United States as a springboard into adulthood. The work could take him to the next Moore, Okla., devastated three months ago by a tornado, or the next New Jersey coastline, ravaged last year by Hurricane Sandy. Kurtzner, 20, is one of 162 young people inducted last week into the federal government's newest service opportunity: the FEMA Corps, a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and AmeriCorps.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Military officials reviewing the government's botched response to Hurricane Katrina are criticizing disaster planning overall, saying that relief plans lack detail on how the Pentagon and other agencies should assist local leaders in the event of a hurricane or terrorist attack. According to officials who requested anonymity, preliminary reviews by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the U.S. Northern Command, the Colorado headquarters that oversees homeland security, point to shortfalls in the National Response Plan, unveiled early this year, which was designed to end the fragmented and confused disaster-relief efforts at all levels of government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The calls went out across the nation, as Bush administration officials asked the country's most seasoned disaster response experts to consider the job of a lifetime: FEMA director. But again and again, the response over the past several months was the same: "No thanks." Unconvinced that the administration is serious about fixing the Federal Emergency Management Agency or that there is enough time to get it done before President Bush's second term ends, seven of these candidates for director or another top FEMA job said in interviews that they had pulled themselves out of the running.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Emergency personnel will converge on Inner Harbor waters near Canton on Wednesday as part of a staged water taxi disaster, an event geared toward assessing rescue capabilities and practicing response techniques. Between 8 a.m. and noon, first responders from various federal, state and local agencies will be rescuing flotation devices and "dummies" representing casualties or adrift taxi passengers in water near the 3200 block of Boston St., the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management said.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
Even as aid trickled in Thursday to earthquake-ravaged Haiti - and estimates emerged of as many as 50,000 dead and countless more gravely injured - experts feared the country was on the brink of a public health disaster that could persist for months. While relief workers hoped to provide food and water and to confront the most pressing of immediate medical needs, from antibiotics to bandages, disaster response experts say what remains ahead could be equally daunting: rebuilding from scratch a public health system that was fragile at best before disaster struck.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 15, 2010
Even as aid trickled in Thursday to earthquake-ravaged Haiti - and estimates emerged of as many as 50,000 dead and countless more gravely injured - experts feared the country was on the brink of a public health disaster that could persist for months. While relief workers hoped to provide food and water and to confront the most pressing of immediate medical needs, from antibiotics to bandages, disaster response experts say what remains ahead could be equally daunting: rebuilding from scratch a public health system that was fragile at best before disaster struck.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Torrey Kurtzner sees the 10 months he signed up to spend at disaster sites across the United States as a springboard into adulthood. The work could take him to the next Moore, Okla., devastated three months ago by a tornado, or the next New Jersey coastline, ravaged last year by Hurricane Sandy. Kurtzner, 20, is one of 162 young people inducted last week into the federal government's newest service opportunity: the FEMA Corps, a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and AmeriCorps.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake appointed an executive with a disaster response company Friday to lead Baltimore's Transportation Department at a time when the agency continues to struggle with its speed camera program. Her pick, William Johnson, has worked since 2005 as a senior manager at O'Brien's Response Management, which billed itself as a provider of emergency preparedness, response management and crisis services when it merged last year with another firm. Johnson has 20 years of public- and private-sector experience in urban transportation, public works, and emergency preparation and response, the mayor's office said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
The injured were bruised and confused. Those displaced were agitated. Police shouted while triage was performed and people were transported to a hospital and shelter from the parking lot of a school that had been leveled by a tornado twisting through Annapolis. The emergency scenario that played out Tuesday morning in Maryland's capital city was a drill aimed at testing the city's response to disaster - a response that Kevin Simmons, emergency operations chief, said went "really well.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Chris Milligan had less than two days to pack up and get himself to Port-au-Prince. "I bought some shirts, paid my bills and went," the Baltimore native says over the telephone from the Haitian capital. It was far from Milligan's first visit to a crisis zone — the U.S. Agency for International Development veteran has worked in Iraq, Zimbabwe and more than 50 other countries. Still, he says, he was struck by the devastation the January earthquake had wrought. "The scale of the destruction can't be overstated," says Milligan, 44. "It's overwhelming, even today."
HEALTH
By Robert Little and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 21, 2010
T he faces of the Haitian disaster arrived Wednesday aboard the Navy hospital ship Comfort as a procession of earthquake victims, looking lost and scared, staggered off helicopters or strained to look up from their stretchers while corpsmen carried them below deck. There was a 20-year-old man with a shattered right leg wincing; a 47-year-old woman with her arm in a splint crying; a school bus driver, burned from the tips of his fingers to the top of his head, smiling. They came from clinics and triage centers across Haiti, beginning just after sunrise and ending at dusk, shattering the ship's military and clinical sterility with the cries and smells and blank stares of human anguish.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
Even as aid trickled in Thursday to earthquake-ravaged Haiti - and estimates emerged of as many as 50,000 dead and countless more gravely injured - experts feared the country was on the brink of a public health disaster that could persist for months. While relief workers hoped to provide food and water and to confront the most pressing of immediate medical needs, from antibiotics to bandages, disaster response experts say what remains ahead could be equally daunting: rebuilding from scratch a public health system that was fragile at best before disaster struck.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 15, 2010
Even as aid trickled in Thursday to earthquake-ravaged Haiti - and estimates emerged of as many as 50,000 dead and countless more gravely injured - experts feared the country was on the brink of a public health disaster that could persist for months. While relief workers hoped to provide food and water and to confront the most pressing of immediate medical needs, from antibiotics to bandages, disaster response experts say what remains ahead could be equally daunting: rebuilding from scratch a public health system that was fragile at best before disaster struck.
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