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Disaster Preparedness

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EXPLORE
August 26, 2011
Following the unexpected earthquake that Marlyand felt, is anyone prepared for another natural disaster? Think about it: How many of us really know what to do if another earthquake strikes? Has anyone really put together emergency-preparedness kits with enough water, medications and other necessities in case of emergencies? I admit that I am not ready when a disaster strikes, and I know I am not the only one. It takes one natural disaster to wake everyone up to get them prepared in the event of another disaster, whether it is a terrorist attack, earthquake or a hurricane.
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EXPLORE
August 26, 2011
Following the unexpected earthquake that Marlyand felt, is anyone prepared for another natural disaster? Think about it: How many of us really know what to do if another earthquake strikes? Has anyone really put together emergency-preparedness kits with enough water, medications and other necessities in case of emergencies? I admit that I am not ready when a disaster strikes, and I know I am not the only one. It takes one natural disaster to wake everyone up to get them prepared in the event of another disaster, whether it is a terrorist attack, earthquake or a hurricane.
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NEWS
February 3, 2006
Hospital auxiliary offers opportunities Howard County General Hospital's Volunteer Auxiliary offers a variety of opportunities. Volunteers are needed: In the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource and Image Center. Volunteers welcome clients and help them with Internet and library research, answer the phone and provide office support. Training is provided. Information: 410-740-5858. At Rave Review Consignment Shop, the auxiliary's upscale shop. The shop is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, noon to 8 p.m. Thursdays, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Hospital auxiliary offers opportunities Howard County General Hospital's Volunteer Auxiliary offers a variety of opportunities. Volunteers are needed: In the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource and Image Center. Volunteers welcome clients and help them with Internet and library research, answer the phone and provide office support. Training is provided. Information: 410-740-5858. At Rave Review Consignment Shop, the auxiliary's upscale shop. The shop is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, noon to 8 p.m. Thursdays, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.
NEWS
September 11, 2005
Career fair set for Sept. 19 at Hopkins APL The Columbia Workforce Center, a division of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, will co-sponsor a career fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 19 at the Kossiakoff Center of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. The fair, which is co-sponsored by Howard County Employment and Training and Howard County Department of Social Services, offers job-seekers access to employers. Those who attend should bring resumes, dress appropriately and be prepared to be interviewed.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 10, 2003
In Baltimore City O'Malley to launch campaign focusing on disaster readiness Mayor Martin O'Malley will launch Civic Works' Project Liberty, a public awareness campaign focused on disaster preparedness, at 11 a.m. Monday at Clifton Mansion in Clifton Park. Civic Works, a Baltimore nonprofit organization, was one of the first organizations in the country to receive a homeland security grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service. A team of 15 part-time AmeriCorps members will provide public health, bioterrorism and disaster preparedness information to local community associations, schools and church groups, with presentations to begin next month.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
Henry Stern, a resident of Kings Contrivance, will hold a Retire George Bush Party at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 26 at the 50+ Center at the east Columbia library, where he is renting a meeting room for the event. "I organized and am paying for this rally, not the Democratic Party or the Kerry/Edwards campaign," Stern wrote in an e-mail. "I'm a naturalized citizen and I love the country, and I hate to see what's happening to it," he said later. "America was the dream of immigrants." Born in Rohrbach, Germany, Stern came to the United States in 1936.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
THE DEVASTATION caused by South Asia's enormous earthquake and resulting monster waves comes at a particularly unfortunate time in the U.S. budget cycle. There have been so many such emergencies of late that officials are already draining relief resources away from less urgent, long-term humanitarian assistance programs. Practical as well as moral concerns suggest that the overall relief category should be increased. But thanks to huge financial burdens imposed by the Iraq War, as well as the revenue lost to tax cuts for the wealthy, the federal budget is so deeply in deficit that the Bush administration is trying to hold the line on what it views as lower priorities.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 18, 2003
We journalists are journalists 24-7, if you know what I mean. We are always on the alert, hooked into world events as if they were our power source and ready to report at a moment's notice. Journalists never take the day off. Late last week, my editors asked that we all keep our "journalistic hats on wherever we are" and report the community's response to heightened terror alerts. Like the old firehouse dog that I am, I felt my blood pump faster, and I asked: "What?" Seems that while I had been working the basketball concession stand and arguing with my teen-ager about her curfew and loading the dishwasher one more time, the Bush administration had increased the terror alert to, I don't know, hot pink, or something, and I had missed it. All I'd heard was something about a possible snowstorm.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
Carroll County will become the first community in Maryland to take advantage of a free federally funded program to prepare for natural or man-made disasters and is hoping to draw local businesses into the mix. The sponsors want to attract about 100 participants to the program, under the direction of Michigan State University's School of Criminal Justice. The workshops will include police, fire and health officials, and nonprofit service groups that will brainstorm ways to prepare for a crisis.
NEWS
September 11, 2005
Career fair set for Sept. 19 at Hopkins APL The Columbia Workforce Center, a division of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, will co-sponsor a career fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 19 at the Kossiakoff Center of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel. The fair, which is co-sponsored by Howard County Employment and Training and Howard County Department of Social Services, offers job-seekers access to employers. Those who attend should bring resumes, dress appropriately and be prepared to be interviewed.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
THE DEVASTATION caused by South Asia's enormous earthquake and resulting monster waves comes at a particularly unfortunate time in the U.S. budget cycle. There have been so many such emergencies of late that officials are already draining relief resources away from less urgent, long-term humanitarian assistance programs. Practical as well as moral concerns suggest that the overall relief category should be increased. But thanks to huge financial burdens imposed by the Iraq War, as well as the revenue lost to tax cuts for the wealthy, the federal budget is so deeply in deficit that the Bush administration is trying to hold the line on what it views as lower priorities.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
Carroll County will become the first community in Maryland to take advantage of a free federally funded program to prepare for natural or man-made disasters and is hoping to draw local businesses into the mix. The sponsors want to attract about 100 participants to the program, under the direction of Michigan State University's School of Criminal Justice. The workshops will include police, fire and health officials, and nonprofit service groups that will brainstorm ways to prepare for a crisis.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
Carroll County will become the first community in Maryland to take advantage of a free federally funded program to prepare for natural or man-made disasters and is hoping to draw local businesses into the mix. The sponsors want to attract about 100 participants to the program, under the direction of Michigan State University's School of Criminal Justice. The workshops will include police, fire and health officials, and nonprofit service groups that will brainstorm ways to prepare for a crisis.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
Henry Stern, a resident of Kings Contrivance, will hold a Retire George Bush Party at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 26 at the 50+ Center at the east Columbia library, where he is renting a meeting room for the event. "I organized and am paying for this rally, not the Democratic Party or the Kerry/Edwards campaign," Stern wrote in an e-mail. "I'm a naturalized citizen and I love the country, and I hate to see what's happening to it," he said later. "America was the dream of immigrants." Born in Rohrbach, Germany, Stern came to the United States in 1936.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 10, 2003
In Baltimore City O'Malley to launch campaign focusing on disaster readiness Mayor Martin O'Malley will launch Civic Works' Project Liberty, a public awareness campaign focused on disaster preparedness, at 11 a.m. Monday at Clifton Mansion in Clifton Park. Civic Works, a Baltimore nonprofit organization, was one of the first organizations in the country to receive a homeland security grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service. A team of 15 part-time AmeriCorps members will provide public health, bioterrorism and disaster preparedness information to local community associations, schools and church groups, with presentations to begin next month.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
Carroll County will become the first community in Maryland to take advantage of a free federally funded program to prepare for natural or man-made disasters and is hoping to draw local businesses into the mix. The sponsors want to attract about 100 participants to the program, under the direction of Michigan State University's School of Criminal Justice. The workshops will include police, fire and health officials, and nonprofit service groups that will brainstorm ways to prepare for a crisis.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 18, 2003
We journalists are journalists 24-7, if you know what I mean. We are always on the alert, hooked into world events as if they were our power source and ready to report at a moment's notice. Journalists never take the day off. Late last week, my editors asked that we all keep our "journalistic hats on wherever we are" and report the community's response to heightened terror alerts. Like the old firehouse dog that I am, I felt my blood pump faster, and I asked: "What?" Seems that while I had been working the basketball concession stand and arguing with my teen-ager about her curfew and loading the dishwasher one more time, the Bush administration had increased the terror alert to, I don't know, hot pink, or something, and I had missed it. All I'd heard was something about a possible snowstorm.
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