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NEWS
December 22, 2010
Your editorial ( "START treaty test," Dec. 21) briefly notes that the first START was a signature diplomatic achievement of President Reagan. It is worth remembering that START was part of a broader agenda of disarmament that President Reagan pursued throughout his two terms of office. Despite their professed admiration for the Reagan administration, Republicans in Congress now call President Obama's similar disarmament goals unrealistic and impossible. It is worth recalling how President Reagan responded to that line of criticism after signing of the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty on December 8, 1987: "For the first time in history, the language of "arms control" was replaced by "arms reduction" — in this case, the complete elimination of an entire class of U.S. and Soviet nuclear missiles.
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NEWS
By Robert C. Koehler | December 15, 2013
Iran! So long our enemy-in-waiting, it's just asking for it, y'know? No wonder Americans are confused about the idea of maybe not going to war with that country one of these days, at least according to USA Today, which reported: "The White House and Ira nface an uphill selling job to convince Americans to embrace the interim nuclear pact negotiated with Tehran last month. " Two out of three Americans who have actually heard something about the accord don't trust it, the paper explains, because, in essence, Iran took American hostages that one time (for no reason)
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NEWS
December 29, 1992
George Bush will not be remembered in history as th !B "education president" or the "environment" president," but he is staking a claim on the title of "disarmament president."
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A team of scientists at Aberdeen Proving Ground may play a critical role in helping the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize, disarm Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. In a squat brick building surrounded by two layers of chain-link fence topped with razor wire, the U.S. Army's Forensic Analytical Center is capable of dissecting samples of suspected or destroyed chemical weapons. It is one of 21 labs around the world certified to work with the organization to confirm the presence of nerve agents and other chemical weapons.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 17, 1996
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Prime Minister John Major of Britain said yesterday that if the IRA restored its cease-fire, the British and Irish governments would not insist on the group's immediate disarmament when a conference to discuss peace and the political future of Northern Ireland starts on June 10.The 17-month cease-fire was broken with a series of bomb attacks beginning on Feb. 9 in London.In recent weeks, Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political wing, has said that a new cease-fire was unlikely without assurances from Major that the talks would not focus on disarmament, thus delaying discussions of a political settlement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 1998
DUBLIN, Ireland -- Gerry Adams, the leader of the political wing of the Irish Republican Army, said yesterday that he could not guarantee that the IRA would agree to disarm during the negotiations in the new Northern Ireland assembly.The IRA said last week, timing its statement for President Clinton's three-day visit to Ireland, that although it found the new Northern Ireland peace agreement a "significant development," it had no plans to disarm.Disarmament will be a major hurdle for the assembly, a mixture of Roman Catholic and Protestant politicians.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 29, 2000
LONDON -- Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political wing, has ruled out the possibility that the underground paramilitary force will move to meet a crucial deadline Monday for the beginning of disarmament. In a speech Thursday night that appeared to acknowledge the setback his statement would represent for the Northern Ireland peace settlement and the future of the fragile new government in Belfast, Adams said that while he understood the wish for immediate action, "It is not easy to get the IRA, or indeed any of the armed groups, to do this speedily.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 20, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - The three men were soldiers of the People's Party in Sugar Canyon, fighting during the time of the Soviets, the civil war, the Taliban. But on May 26, they joined Afghanistan's disarmament program and traded their weapons for a chance at another life. Now, Mohamad Farid studies. Sakhy Mohamad sells watermelons. Abdul Wahid welds doors. None is happy. "They haven't done what they promised. They haven't given us what they said," Wahid said. "It is like promising a horse to someone and giving a donkey."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - Iraq's announcement that it will begin destroying its prohibited missiles seemed to stiffen resistance yesterday to a U.S.-led war, with Russia bluntly threatening to exercise its veto power at the United Nations to block authorization of military force. The warning from Russia further complicates efforts by the United States and Britain to pass a U.N. resolution stating that Iraq's regime has missed its final chance to disarm. White House officials said they remained confident of winning enough support for the resolution in time for a vote by the U.N. Security Council, expected in about two weeks.
NEWS
March 8, 2003
The following is an excerpt of British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw's remarks to the U.N. Security Council: In his remarks, Dominique de Villepin said that - and described a lot of diplomatic pressure by the nonaligned movement, by the European Union, by the Arab League and by many others. And I greatly welcome all of that diplomatic pressure. Dominique went on to say, "And the United States and United Kingdom forces lend support to that pressure." With respect to my good friend, I think it's the other way around.
NEWS
December 22, 2010
Your editorial ( "START treaty test," Dec. 21) briefly notes that the first START was a signature diplomatic achievement of President Reagan. It is worth remembering that START was part of a broader agenda of disarmament that President Reagan pursued throughout his two terms of office. Despite their professed admiration for the Reagan administration, Republicans in Congress now call President Obama's similar disarmament goals unrealistic and impossible. It is worth recalling how President Reagan responded to that line of criticism after signing of the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty on December 8, 1987: "For the first time in history, the language of "arms control" was replaced by "arms reduction" — in this case, the complete elimination of an entire class of U.S. and Soviet nuclear missiles.
NEWS
October 15, 2008
Having removed North Korea from its list of terrorist nations in order to coax it back into compliance with a previous agreement to scrap its nuclear weapons in exchange for aid and energy assistance, the U.S. still has no idea whether the reclusive communist state really intends to fulfill its commitment to disarm. The loopholes in the deal U.S. negotiator Christopher Hill managed to salvage in Pyongyang last week are big enough to drive several atom bombs through. But that may be the best the Bush administration could hope for in its waning days.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 2007
. BEIJING --The United States and four other nations reached a tentative agreement today to provide North Korea with roughly $400 million in fuel oil, economic aid and humanitarian assistance, in return for the North to start to disable its nuclear facilities and allow nuclear inspectors back into the country, according to U.S. officials who have reviewed a proposed text. While the accord sets a 60-day deadline for the North to accomplish those first steps toward disarmament, it leaves until an undefined future moment - and to another negotiation - the actual removal of North Korea's nuclear weapons and the fuel that it has manufactured to produce them.
NEWS
By Mitchell Landsberg and Mitchell Landsberg,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
BEIJING -- Disarmament talks with North Korea recessed yesterday in another round of frustration for the United States and its allies, with analysts saying that there appears to be little hope in the foreseeable future that Pyongyong will agree to abandon its nuclear weapons program. "Of course, we're disappointed," said the chief U.S. negotiator, Christopher Hill, after a week of six-nation talks came to an end without a glimmer of an agreement. He said it became apparent as the week progressed that the North Korean delegates had no authorization from their leaders to compromise, so that "interesting" informal discussions had no chance of turning into formal agreements.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 29, 2005
LONDON - More than three decades after the start of a deadly struggle against British rule, the Irish Republican Army announced yesterday that it would give up its arms and fight solely in the political arena, potentially ending the bloodiest chapter in modern Irish history. The IRA said it planned to lay down its weapons at 4 p.m. yesterday, a monumental development welcomed by virtually all quarters - but the announcement quickly followed with calls for proof. More than 3,500 people - Catholics and Protestants - have been killed in the 36 years of fighting.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 26, 2004
BEIJING - North Korea raised the possibility of testing a nuclear weapon but also said more clearly than ever that it would consider dismantling its nuclear programs, a senior U.S. official said yesterday as a third round of international talks on the North's nuclear ambitions neared an end. The mixing of messages - what the official called "some good, some bad, some a little ugly" - is a hallmark of North Korea's brinkmanship style of negotiation, and...
NEWS
March 8, 2003
The following is an excerpt of chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix's report to the U.N. Security Council: On 14 February, I reported to the Council that the Iraqi side had become more active in taking and proposing steps, which potentially might shed new light on unresolved disarmament issues. Even a week ago, when the current quarterly report was finalized, there was still relatively little tangible progress to note. Hence, the cautious formulations in the report before you. As of today, there is more.
NEWS
May 11, 2000
POWER-SHARING in a "devolved" government of Northern Ireland should be back, May 22. With it will come cross-border institutions linking both Irish states in practical matters, and British Isles arrangements putting Irish lawmakers in touch with British, Scots and Welsh counterparts. All that because the IRA found a design for disarmament -- previously "decommissioning" but now "deactivation" -- that meets its own scruples against surrender while making the gesture Unionists require. The IRA will show arms caches to two international inspectors: former President Martti Ahtisaari of Finland, who supervised disarmament of the Kosovo Liberation Army, and Cyril Ramaphosa, former secretary-general of the African National Congress, an old friend to the IRA. The IRA pledge that this will "initiate a process that will completely and verifiably put IRA arms beyond use," seems to promise effective disarmament in a year, or roughly a year behind schedule.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2004
BEIJING - In an apparent bid to gain the initiative and blunt charges that it has been inflexible, the United States yesterday laid out a complex proposal at the start of a new round of talks aimed at finding a way to end North Korea's nuclear weapons program. The United States has come under criticism in Asia for refusing to compromise even as North Korea has offered olive branches to its neighbors. "We are prepared for serious discussion and we have a proposal to offer," U.S. Assistant Secretary of State James A. Kelly said.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 20, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - The three men were soldiers of the People's Party in Sugar Canyon, fighting during the time of the Soviets, the civil war, the Taliban. But on May 26, they joined Afghanistan's disarmament program and traded their weapons for a chance at another life. Now, Mohamad Farid studies. Sakhy Mohamad sells watermelons. Abdul Wahid welds doors. None is happy. "They haven't done what they promised. They haven't given us what they said," Wahid said. "It is like promising a horse to someone and giving a donkey."
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