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By Kalman R. Hettleman | October 7, 2014
This summer, Arne Duncan, the U.S. secretary of education, startled public school systems nationwide by shifting the focus of enforcement of federal laws covering students with disabilities from technical compliance like timelines to accountability for academic outcomes. The shift has seismic impact, plunging the number of states who fully meet federal requirements from 41 to 18. Maryland, despite laudable efforts, is one of the fallen states. Parents of students with disabilities think the change in policy is long overdue.
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NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | October 7, 2014
This summer, Arne Duncan, the U.S. secretary of education, startled public school systems nationwide by shifting the focus of enforcement of federal laws covering students with disabilities from technical compliance like timelines to accountability for academic outcomes. The shift has seismic impact, plunging the number of states who fully meet federal requirements from 41 to 18. Maryland, despite laudable efforts, is one of the fallen states. Parents of students with disabilities think the change in policy is long overdue.
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NEWS
April 28, 2006
The decision by Baltimore school officials to stop fighting a federal court order requiring the state to take more responsibility for special education in the city is a triumph of good sense over pride. While U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis' order was flawed, the chances that it would be overturned by a federal appeals court were pretty slim. Dropping the appeal should pave the way for city and state educators to come together to help disabled students. City school officials were rightly angered last year when Judge Garbis, as part of a long-standing lawsuit on behalf of Baltimore's disabled students and their families, ordered the Maryland State Department of Education - a co-defendant in the case - to install super-managers over every city school department that dealt with special education, from finances and transportation to human resources.
NEWS
By Molly Geary, Capital News Service | March 30, 2014
Chris Patterson stood between two bocce courts during practice at Broadneck High School in Annapolis, shouting encouragement to his teammates. "Bend your knees!" the junior yelled to one player whose throw fell too short. Patterson is a team captain of Broadneck's unified bocce team. Six years ago, he wouldn't even have been able to play. Patterson is one of thousands of disabled students across Maryland who are playing high school sports through unified or allied sports teams, which are composed of both students with disabilities and those without.
FEATURES
By Trena Johnson and Trena Johnson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 26, 1999
A group of young people with learning and physical disabilities has gathered at Fell's Point Corner Theatre to rehearse an inspirational, original play titled "Education Is a Two-Way Street."The first performance is tonight at the League for the Handicapped, 1111 E. Coldspring Lane.The play confronts the problems disabled students encounter in public schools and is performed by young people with disabilities."Education Is a Two Way Street" is directed by Barry Feinstein, who has been working at the theater for 12 years.
NEWS
February 21, 1995
Kimberly Kelly's fourth-grade class at Eldersburg Elementary School will visit Carroll Springs School today to participate in a joint life-skills activity with Meredith Williams' fourth- and fifth-grade students.The activity will employ sign language and other communication devices to help the Eldersburg students in their health unit as they learn to communicate with disabled students at Carroll Springs.The students will divide into two groups for a math and cooking activity.Students in all grades at Eldersburg will have a chance to participate in the annual "Jump Rope for Heart" event tomorrow.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
The mother of a second-grader moved from the Chatsworth School for learning-disabled youngsters to a neighborhood school was not happy."We have real problems," she told the Baltimore County school board. The second-grader feels isolated in her new classroom, and her teachers often are unprepared to deal with her disabilities, her mother said.In contrast, the mother of a 4-year-old moved out of Chatsworth told a different story. "My child is doing very well," said Jean Considine. She said she wished every county student and parent had the kind of program she found at Reisterstown Elementary.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | February 26, 1992
Theodore R. Johnson has his checkbook ready to guarantee every disabled student in Florida a college education.In what is believed to be the nation's largest donation to the handicapped, Mr. Johnson, a 90-year-old millionaire from Delray Beach, Fla., has promised to help foot the full tuition for all disabled students in Florida's nine public universities.The awards, which would begin in the fall, would help an estimated 2,000 students meet the rising cost of higher education. The gifts would average about $2,500 per student, but could be as high at $5,000 per year.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | November 18, 1990
Harford has agreed to be one of two school districts in the state to launch a pilot program next fall to integrate special education students into neighborhood schools.The other school district that will take part in the program, aimed at studying the best ways to educate disabled students, is Queen Anne's county.In Harford, special education students from two school areas will attend neighborhood schools under the pilot program approved by the county Board of Education Monday. A planning committee will choose one elementary and one middle school in Harford by January for the program.
NEWS
By Jenny Huddleston and Jenny Huddleston,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 9, 1998
Tim O'Neill walks into work as if he owns the place. With a quick greeting to his cafeteria co-workers, he's already unstacking chairs.Leah Alikahn wants to be a writer, but for now she's content straightening greeting cards and clothing in the Towson University bookstore.From afar, it's hard to tell they're both developmentally disabled. Their comfort is due, in part, to the Towson University Outreach Program, which gives developmentally disabled adults between the ages of 18 and 21 an educational transition into the "real world."
NEWS
BY ALLAN VOUGHT and ERIKA BUTLER and avought@theaegis.com, ebutler@theaegis.com | April 11, 2013
A federal lawsuit has been filed against the Harford County Public Schools and two school officials on behalf of a disabled student, who the suit claims was subjected to years of continuous bullying and threats from other students beginning when he was a student at Church Creek Elementary School and continuing when he was a student at Aberdeen Middle and High schools. The suit contends the school system not only failed to address the problem, but also failed to protect the student from the abuse.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Special-education advocates are calling for the state to do more to address the bullying of disabled students, saying that a recent lawsuit against the city school system highlights the long-lasting harm that harassment can do to such children. Experts want officials to strengthen Maryland's anti-bullying laws to provide more detailed rules for educators to follow in reporting incidents and more scrutiny in situations that involve sometimes-fragile students. "They have targets on their back, and with a child who already has a disability, the damage can be greater," said Ellen Callegary, an attorney and special-education advocate for more than 30 years, who is part of a coalition of advocates pressing for changes at the state level.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Madera | July 15, 2011
I received an open letter from Krys Renzi, the former marketing director of the Norbel School, and she asked that I share the news that will so adversely affect the learning disabled students that will not return to these halls of hope, and also with a heavy heart for those who will never know what could have been. As some of you may have heard, Norbel School has shuttered their doors after nearly 30 years of existence, 11 of those years in Elkridge at the former home of the old Elkridge Elementary School on Old Washington Road.
NEWS
By Kate Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
Virginia P. Flaherty, a former Baltimore Sun editor and political activist, died Tuesday of lung cancer at her home in Daisy, Howard County. She was 81. Mrs. Flaherty, the daughter of a Container Corp. of America executive and a registered nurse, was born in Philadelphia. After graduating from Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pa., she majored in English and French at the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated with high honors in 1952. Mrs. Flaherty's godfather, Fred Nelson, a well-known conservative editorial writer for The Sun, was a large presence and influence on her life after her parents' divorce, prompting her to later work for the Sun as well.
SPORTS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2008
Amid its flurry of final-day action, the General Assembly unanimously approved a bill requiring schools to provide disabled students access to sports programs, either among themselves or with able-bodied students. Under the measure known as the Fitness and Athletics Equity for Students with Disabilities, schools have three years to fully implement the requirements. "Once this bill is passed, you can't take it away," said Tatyana McFadden, an Atholton wheelchair athlete who testified at hearings last month in Annapolis.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
The State Board of Education recommended yesterday that its school systems adopt a policy that would allow students with disabilities to try out for athletic teams. "We wanted to try to do something statewide," said Maryland State Board of Education President Dunbar Brooks. "Local school districts need to look at this." Howard, Harford, and Baltimore counties have policies that address - in some form - the access students with disabilities have to athletics teams, Brooks said. Baltimore City is working on policy guidelines, Brooks added.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Legislators from Anne Arundel, Harford and two other counties are pushing a bill that would increase state education aid for the severely disabled children of local military personnel, a measure that supporters say could provide up to $250,000 a year in badly needed funding. Although the legislation is focused on a small group of children -- three or four in Anne Arundel, which has the largest military population -- it is part of a growing push by some state lawmakers to highlight what they consider the federal government's failure to shoulder its share of the burden for educating the children of military families.
FEATURES
By Chuck Myers and Chuck Myers,Knight-Ridder | January 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Very Special Arts, an arts organization dedicated to quality programs for disabled artists, is calling on students to help celebrate the 200th anniversary of the world's most famous residence with their own artwork."
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Maryland's High School Assessment tests, which are required for graduation starting with the Class of 2009, are coming under increased scrutiny as the Maryland State Board of Education prepares to reassess the tests in meetings scheduled for next week. Board members will review a proposal by state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick to allow students who have repeatedly failed the tests to complete a senior project instead. While testing students to determine how much they have mastered important subjects is worthwhile, all students must be given adequate preparation to pass the tests and -- particularly for special-education students -- sufficient options to meet graduation requirements.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | August 5, 2007
Before the start of the four-day Youth Leadership Forum on Tuesday, Bernadette Tierney had to convince her 18-year-old autistic son that it was worth going. At the last minute, Christopher Rydzy backed out of staying overnight at the dormitories at Bowie State University, opting instead to attend the daytime workshops on learning how to be more independent. The decision was not out of character for Rydzy, a senior at Arundel High School. He has trouble accepting changes in his routine.
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