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By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 31, 1996
As the issue of assisted suicide goes before the Supreme Court on Jan. 8, disabled people plan to rally outside, protesting that the practice could leave them vulnerable to being rushed into death."
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
At a noisy warehouse off Veterans Highway in Millersville, a young woman concentrates as she pokes black shoelaces into cardboard packaging. In another room, workers slowly count tiny bottles of hair products, placing them in plastic bags that will end up as samples in salons. To some, these workers with developmental disabilities are getting valuable on-the-job-training and the self-respect that comes with employment. Others say they're being exploited - because wages in the facility, run by a nonprofit, are as low as 25 cents an hour.
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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
When Gov. Parris N. Glendening presents his first state budget today, a program that provides emergency cash and medical care to poor, disabled people may be among the missing.Known as the Disability Assistance and Loan Program, or DALP, the program gives roughly 20,000 adults a monthly stipend of $157, which costs Maryland about $34 million a year. With that check comes a clearinghouse of services. Soon, many recipients find themselves with medical care, a place to live and counseling.Joe Johnson, 45, got a place to live.
NEWS
By Debbie McFadden | April 7, 2014
My daughter, Tatyana McFadden, was born with a disability - an underdeveloped spinal cord that resulted in paralysis below her waist - in St. Petersburg, Russia. She fought for her life then, and later, with the same determination, for her right to compete in athletics. Now, we are fighting for the rights of others around the world. My daughter Tatyana McFadden is a world-champion athlete. She is the only person - man or woman, disabled or not - to win four premier marathon races in one year.
NEWS
By Debbie McFadden | April 7, 2014
My daughter, Tatyana McFadden, was born with a disability - an underdeveloped spinal cord that resulted in paralysis below her waist - in St. Petersburg, Russia. She fought for her life then, and later, with the same determination, for her right to compete in athletics. Now, we are fighting for the rights of others around the world. My daughter Tatyana McFadden is a world-champion athlete. She is the only person - man or woman, disabled or not - to win four premier marathon races in one year.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
A rare element of promise entered Tyrone DeGrace's young life last year. Among hundreds of special education students shortchanged by the Baltimore schools, Tyrone came in line for court-ordered help: free enrollment at a private school for learning-disabled children. The job of getting 11-year-old Tyrone the six miles from his West Baltimore housing project to school - the linchpin for the arrangement - fell to the state's "Mobility" program, intended to be a transportation lifeline for thousands of disabled people in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
At a noisy warehouse off Veterans Highway in Millersville, a young woman concentrates as she pokes black shoelaces into cardboard packaging. In another room, workers slowly count tiny bottles of hair products, placing them in plastic bags that will end up as samples in salons. To some, these workers with developmental disabilities are getting valuable on-the-job-training and the self-respect that comes with employment. Others say they're being exploited - because wages in the facility, run by a nonprofit, are as low as 25 cents an hour.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | May 28, 1993
Future recreation programs in Carroll should integrate people with disabilities, the county's Recreation and Parks Board said Wednesday night.The board voted unanimously to adopt a report that recommends allowing disabled people to participate in the same recreation programs as others who are not.Carroll County could be a "front-runner" in the movement to integrate disabled people into recreation programs, said Robin Farinholt, who chaired the committee that...
NEWS
By HUGH GREGORY GALLAGHER | October 16, 1991
Cabin John. -- The old bad way of looking at disabled people has been replaced by a new bad way of looking at them.The old stereotype of disability was personified by the March of Dimes poster child -- a lovely little girl, leaning on her little crutches, her legs encased in braces, rather like a handicapped Campbell Soup kid. This was meant to evoke a cloying combination of pathos, pity and money -- and it did. The misleading image this conveyed was of...
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
About 300 homeless people, advocates and students gathered outside the State House in Annapolis yesterday to sing, shout, pray, wave signs and plead for the state to end a freeze on cash assistance for low-income, disabled people. Damon Heard, 33, a caseworker at the nonprofit Health Care for the Homeless, leaned toward a microphone in the center of the crowd and rhymed a tune he wrote for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. as a friend jammed beside him on a guitar. Around Heard, beneath a statue of Thurgood Marshall, scores of protesters waved neon yellow and orange signs reading: "People over Profit!
NEWS
Erin Cox and Timothy Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The plan to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour cleared Maryland's Senate Saturday afternoon. Although lawmakers must still work out details on who would be exempted from the hike and how long it would take to implement, compromises reached by key lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley earlier in the week suggest the Senate version will become law. That plan, approved by senators in a 34-13 vote, calls for incrementally raising the...
NEWS
March 7, 2014
I strongly agree with letter writer Stephen H. Morgan's points regarding the work performed by direct care staff and the impact a minimum-wage increase could have on "front line" caregivers for developmentally disabled people ( "Minimum wage should not penalize disabled," Jan. 23). I see the work done daily as a member of the Chimes team. Most direct care staff are genuine, caring people, and while we all work to earn a paycheck, these folks daily go above and beyond. If direct care support staff wages are not raised in line with a minimum wage increase, many will be forced to seek employment elsewhere in order to provide for their families.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
I agree that those who care for people with disabilities should earn a living wage ( "Minimum wage debate ignores crucial group," Jan. 15). I have been a direct-care staff worker at the Athelas Institute in Columbia for more than 10 years, yet the new people coming in with no experience make almost as much as I do. I have had experience working with disabled people since I was 19, when my oldest son was born with learning disabilities....
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Letter to The Aegis | January 25, 2013
Editor: The main objective covered in this letter is makinga case for why transportation for the disabled should be more accessible. People with disabilities try to keep their dignity by doing things for themselves. For it shows natural independence as opposed to having a person care for them hence assisted living. It is very difficult for the disabled people to get around Harford County. For example, people who want to see a special event in another part of the county or in another county, must arrange rides to the event.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
Regarding Yvonne Wenger 's article on Social Security Disability, she is correct regarding how long it can take for truly needy people to be approved for disability benefits ("After a disability, long waits for federal benefits," Oct. 28). My cousin, who is in her 60s, has had diabetes since childhood. During the last 15 years she has had chronic blood vessel leakage in her eyes and suffered diabetic comas and chronic kidney failures. All that time she continued to work as a special needs teacher assistant.
FEATURES
By Connor Letourneau, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Walt Williams isn't one to shy away from a challenge. The former NBA veteran, after all, is perhaps best known for playing under the most trying circumstances in the history of Maryland basketball. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the Terps were in the midst of major NCAA sanctions after the death of forward Len Bias, Williams honored his commitment to his home-state school and starred under new coach Gary Williams. It was a decision that forever endeared Walt Williams to Maryland fans, one many believe helped save the program.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON | September 1, 1991
Disability-rights advocates suspected the Bush administration was being less than honest in claiming that it was on their side when the president signed the Americans with Disabilities Act this time last year amid much public-relations hype. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission rules announced on the anniversary of the act's signing confirmed those advocates' suspicions.These rules -- which are final -- will let companies avoid hiring a disabled person if the company thinks that particular worker might hurt himself (be "a danger to himself," is how the rules put it)
NEWS
By Janice Jackson | June 15, 1995
ON THE SURFACE, it would appear to be a really simple issue. TV commercials, magazines and catalogs are increasingly using models in wheelchairs to sell merchandise.This idea has become so popular that some modeling agencies have begun recruiting disabled people for such jobs. Recently, in New York City, a modeling agency opened that is just for people who are infected with the virus that causes AIDS. The agency founder said he wanted advertisers to use people who actually had the virus in ads promoting products to help HIV-positive people.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2010
Hours after meeting for the first debate of their hotly contested rematch, Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley and Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. shared a stage again Monday afternoon to address the concerns of people with disabilities. Both candidates promoted their records on disability issues — Ehrlich created a state Department of Disabilities and O'Malley said he nearly doubled funding for programs for infants and toddlers with developmental issues — but hammered home differences on key issues.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
Zarifa Roberson was supposed to be taking a break from studying for the law school admissions exam, clearing her head with a stop at a Barnes & Noble near her home in Philadelphia. Soon enough, the break turned into another project, a project that has now entered a new phase in Baltimore. This was the summer of 2003, and she had recently graduated from college, was studying for the LSAT and browsing the store's magazine selections. There were magazines for bikers and hikers, runners, travelers, eaters, golfers - just about every category of person one could think of, except disabled people, a group to which Roberson has belonged since she was born with a rare condition that contracts joints throughout the body, dislocates hips, locks the jaw. Roberson, who is 30 and lives in Timonium, had struggled through arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with years of painful physical therapy and many surgeries, gaining the ability to walk when she was 4. Now this magazine rack seemed to be presenting another challenge.
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