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By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The recent death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child at an Anne Arundel County group home was just the latest in a series of problems at LifeLine, the state contractor that has been paid millions in taxpayer funds to care for "medically fragile" individuals, a two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun has found. Even before Damaud Martin's death on July 2, LifeLine had struggled for years to provide around-the-clock care for its residents - adults and foster children often confined to a bed or wheelchair by paralysis, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The recent death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child at an Anne Arundel County group home was just the latest in a series of problems at LifeLine, the state contractor that has been paid millions in taxpayer funds to care for "medically fragile" individuals, a two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun has found. Even before Damaud Martin's death on July 2, LifeLine had struggled for years to provide around-the-clock care for its residents - adults and foster children often confined to a bed or wheelchair by paralysis, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
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NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
Agnes Levine-Oliver had a nervous breakdown caring for her blind, mentally retarded son at home. Two years ago, the Towson woman reluctantly placed 8-year-old Quori in a Baltimore rehabilitation hospital.But this September, Quori returned home, his way smoothed by a little-known state program that lets the family use Medicaid money to pay for the boy's at-home nursing care.Though still in its pilot stage, the program already is helping dozens of children like Quori move out of the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, the state's largest rehabilitation and specialty hospital for youngsters with chronic medical conditions.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Two Maryland lawmakers said Friday they will ask a state Senate committee to explore the death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who was in the care of a group home. Another state senator who advocates for people with disabilities said the boy's death at the Laurel-area group home pointed to a shortage of funding and resources to serve vulnerable people in Maryland. The Baltimore Sun reported Thursday that the boy died as the state was in the process of shutting down the home amid concern about staffing problems at the center.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
Anna Iacoboni, who came to Baltimore as an immigrant and became the matriarch of her family with four generations of descendants, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 98. Born Anna DeNicolis in Brazil, where her parents were temporarily working, she grew up in the village of San Salvo in the Abruzzi region of Italy. "As a child, she carried water from the town square to her home," said her grandson, Thomas M. Culotta, who lives in Remington. "She could talk about World War I troops coming through her village and how her family hid food from them."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writers | February 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- More than 200,000 children would lose their federal disability payments and health care under sweeping Republican welfare proposals that a House subcommittee is expected to approve next week, congressional aides say.The plan would also eliminate cash payments -- as much as $458 a month -- for most children added to the rolls in the future, though it would preserve the grants for 700,000 current beneficiaries who would remain on the rolls.Under...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 23, 1997
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Disneyland has ended a 20-year-old event that allowed youngsters with disabilities to enjoy the park at discount prices, a move being loudly decried by some parents and activists.Disneyland decided to discontinue its "Happy Hearts" program, a six-day event that attracted thousands of disabled children and young adults to the Magic Kingdom twice a year.The action is the latest effort by Disneyland to reduce the number of discounted and free admissions to the park. Marching bands, employees' families and others have seen admission policies tightened as park attendance has swelled to an estimated 15 million annually.
NEWS
By Rachel D. Mansour and Rachel D. Mansour,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 3, 2000
Jamie L. Jean hated to put her 6-year-old son, Matthew, on the yellow school bus every morning for the hourlong ride to Shipley's Choice Elementary School in Millersville. Her son, now 8, has Down syndrome. He was enrolled in the school's special education program for disabled children when she, her husband and three sons moved to Annapolis in 1997. Anne Arundel County school officials said Shipley's Choice was the closest school with such a program. "It wasn't fair. I couldn't let go of it," Jean said, recalling the commute her son endured -- and how she called Windsor Farm Elementary in Annapolis every day for six months until officials there agreed to set up a program for him and other disabled children.
NEWS
By Rachel D. Mansour and Rachel D. Mansour,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 3, 2000
Jamie L. Jean hated to put her 6-year-old son, Matthew, on the school bus every morning for the hourlong ride to Shipley's Choice Elementary School in Millersville. Her son, now 8, has Down syndrome. He was enrolled in the school's special education program for disabled children when she, her husband and three sons moved to Annapolis in 1997. Anne Arundel County school officials said Shipley's Choice was the closest school with such a program. "It wasn't fair. I couldn't let go of it," Jean said, recalling the commute her son endured -- and how she called Windsor Farm Elementary in Annapolis every day for six months until officials there agreed to set up a program for him and other disabled children.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1997
When Citibank transferred Bradley LaLonde to Vietnam, the general manager felt a twinge in his stomach: Where would his young son, who has cerebral palsy, get treatment? Within days of his arrival, LaLonde found himself at a rundown children's hospital in Hanoi, where braces were made of bamboo and equipment was broken.But a dynamic rehabilitation doctor with a vision to improve care for disabled children impressed LaLonde. It struck the American businessman that the hospital was a primitive version of Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute, where his 6-year-old son Phillip is treated.
NEWS
By Debbie McFadden | April 7, 2014
My daughter, Tatyana McFadden, was born with a disability - an underdeveloped spinal cord that resulted in paralysis below her waist - in St. Petersburg, Russia. She fought for her life then, and later, with the same determination, for her right to compete in athletics. Now, we are fighting for the rights of others around the world. My daughter Tatyana McFadden is a world-champion athlete. She is the only person - man or woman, disabled or not - to win four premier marathon races in one year.
NEWS
By Sue van Essen, Svanessen2@hotmail.com | December 30, 2013
On a Saturday morning in December, well before the sun was up, 3-year-old Bobby Mercado was up and ready to go. His destination: the North Pole. First came the long drive to Washington Dulles International Airport, a ride which, despite light traffic, seemed to take forever. As Bobby and his parents, Jean and Robert Mercado, approached the airport, a series of three large flashing signs directed them - as well as other children who were arriving - to special parking for the North Pole flight.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
I was troubled that Casa de Maryland and the NAACP are against gifted and talented programs in Maryland public schools but I was not surprised ("Rules on gifted education criticized," Feb. 28). These groups that confuse equality with low educational expectations for minorities should step back and chill. When my children were in school, many PTA members whose children did not cut the mustard for gifted and talented programs went bustling up the school system's hierarchy to destroy those programs as too high brow, un-American and insufficiently egalitarian.
EXPLORE
August 26, 2011
During last week's Cal Ripken Major/70 World Series at the Ripken Academy in Aberdeen, a few dozen disabled children were afforded the opportunity to play ball, a chance that might not have been there were it not for the League of Dreams program. Convening on the turf practice field on Saturday afternoon, the local children were treated to a baseball clinic, during which they were instructed on the hitting, fielding and throwing aspects of the game, and were supposed to take part in a scrimmage game, but that was canceled when a heavy rainstorm cut short the proceedings.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Madera | July 15, 2011
I received an open letter from Krys Renzi, the former marketing director of the Norbel School, and she asked that I share the news that will so adversely affect the learning disabled students that will not return to these halls of hope, and also with a heavy heart for those who will never know what could have been. As some of you may have heard, Norbel School has shuttered their doors after nearly 30 years of existence, 11 of those years in Elkridge at the former home of the old Elkridge Elementary School on Old Washington Road.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Sarah E. Beaty, a homemaker who had worked with special-needs students, died Monday of pneumonia at York Hospital in York, Pa. She was 89. The 50-year Savage resident had lived in new Freedom, Pa., since 2005. Sarah Elizabeth Parks was born in Sykesville, where she spent her early years before moving with her family to Baltimore. She was a graduate of city public schools, and in 1941 married John Wesley Beaty, a businessman. He died in 1994. In 1955, the couple moved to Savage, where Mrs. Beaty worked for eight years as a cafeteria worker for Howard County public schools.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2003
Ask these Baltimore schoolchildren how their garden is growing by the Inner Harbor Pier 5 waterfront, and some struggle to answer. Others flash a smile in reply as they point to the part of the garden that they struggled to plant. All 17 children are in wheelchairs and needed special gardening tools to accomplish their task. Wade Simmons, 8, dug into the dirt. Michael Davis, 6, spread some mulch. Ashley Ford, 10, got her fingers into the ground, to see that everything was firmly pressed and planted.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Dressed in her riding togs, Abby Mahoney-Cloutier, 10, took one brief look around the familiar barn, with the horses peering out of their stalls, and burst into sobs. Overwhelmed by fear, the autistic child flailed at the walls. Joan Marie Twining, Abby's riding instructor for the past year, put her arm around the wiry young girl and spoke in soft, assuring tones. With Abby now subdued, Twining walked her to a tethered horse named Izzy and handed the child a brush. Talking to Izzy in the same gentle tones she had just heard, Abby groomed the horse she considers her own. "I know you are liking that," she whispered in Izzy's ear. Watching from the side, Abby's mother says she has often seen her daughter's mood transformed at Twining's Rose of Sharon Equestrian School from inconsolable to confident.
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