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By Boston Globe | April 13, 1993
The lazy black. The miserly Jew. The dumb Pole. The ditsy woman. Unfair, unacceptable stereotypes. We all know better than to cast people this way. At least, we should.There is another stereotype that rings just as sour to some of the people involved, but it is so little recognized by the rest of us that a portrayal of it won the Academy Award this year for best actor: the angry, bitter disabled person.As in the foul-mouthed, nasty, friendless Lt. Col. Frank Slade, the protagonist of "Scent of a Woman," played by Al Pacino and directed by Martin Brest.
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NEWS
December 5, 2012
Much ink has been spilled in recent weeks criticizing the Republican Party and its failed presidential candidate for a lack of compassion and obvious antipathy toward "47 percent" of the electorate (if not a bit more), so it was reassuring to see two of its more prominent leaders offer a message of inclusion and uplift at a Jack Kemp Foundation dinner on Tuesday. Too bad that on the same day, Republicans were reverting to form in the Senate chamber. There, the late Mr. Kemp's 1996 top-of-ticket running-mate, Bob Dole - recently released from hospital care and assisted by wheelchair - was unable to coax sufficient GOP support for what should have been a no-brainer for members of a truly compassionate party: the Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities.
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NEWS
By Daniel Erchick | July 31, 2012
On July 26, 1990, when President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on the lawn of the White House, I was too young be in attendance, or even understand the impact that this monumental law would have on the United States by protecting the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities. People like me. About two weeks ago, an email popped into my inbox explaining that the Senate had scheduled a hearing to discuss U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
NEWS
By Daniel Erchick | July 31, 2012
On July 26, 1990, when President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on the lawn of the White House, I was too young be in attendance, or even understand the impact that this monumental law would have on the United States by protecting the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities. People like me. About two weeks ago, an email popped into my inbox explaining that the Senate had scheduled a hearing to discuss U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
Disability rights activist Marilynn J. Phillips says a $2,000 state grant awarded to a Western Maryland College theater group should be rescinded because the group stages its productions in a building that is not accessible to disabled patrons.The college was chosen early this month to receive the grant for its Theatre on the Hill group from the Maryland State Arts Council. The theater operates in Alumni Hall.Ms. Phillips of Hampstead said the grant should be revoked because Alumni Hall lacks a handicapped-accessible route to restrooms.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | August 1, 1993
NO PITY: HOW THE DISABILITY RIGHTS MOVEMENT IS CHANGING AMERICAJoseph P. ShapiroTimes Books388 pages, $25 Asmartly groomed young woman sits in an airport lounge awaiting her flight, sipping occasionally from a plastic cup of coffee. Another woman walks quickly by and plunks a quarter into the cup, splashing coffee on the blouse of the seated woman. Seeing her mistake, and for the first time noticing the briefcase leaning against the battery-powered wheelchair of the seated woman, the "benefactor" hurries out of the presence of Marylou Breslin, executive director of the Disability Rights, Education and Defense Fund.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
Dale R. Reid, a civil rights attorney who excelled at disability issues, died of muscular dystrophy Thursday at his home in Marriottsville. He was 62. "He was a freedom fighter extraordinaire, who helped many disabled people get on track," said Gayle Hafner, an attorney and colleague at the Maryland Disability Law Center. "He metamorphosed from a mild-mannered country lawyer who used a wheelchair into a passionate, systems-changing agent." With a nearly $50,000 grant awarded to him from the Open Society Institute in 2003, Mr. Reid worked with Baltimore's elections board to make all polling places in the city accessible.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
The summer dinner at City Cafe in Baltimore had several purposes, according to its organizers. "It's a combination of getting attention to our causes and celebrating the renovation [of City Cafe]," said Curt Decker, executive director of the National Disability Rights Network. "We are sort of new to the fundraising scene," said Virginia Knowlton, executive director of the Maryland Disability Law Center, scanning the room. "But given the crisis in legal services funding, we're very pleased with the wonderful turnout."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
Frank and Nazzareno "Naz" Velleggia had served plenty of people in wheelchairs at Velleggia's, their 64-year-old restaurant in Little Italy. No one had ever complained about using a steep concrete ramp to a side service entrance, they said. "We expect you to clean the dishes," Naz Velleggia remembers joking as he wheeled patrons through the kitchen. "They got a kick out of it." That changed June 1, 1996, when Roberta Cepko dined at Velleggia's. Cepko says she had to wait as restaurant staff unlocked the side entrance, and her date had to push her up and down the ramp, which has no guardrails and ends in an abrupt 1-inch drop to the street.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Eight disabled rights activists took over a conference room in a state office building in Baltimore for six hours yesterday before agreeing to leave. The activists, members of Maryland ADAPT, were demanding a meeting with Gov. Parris N. Glendening to discuss the placement of disabled people in nursing homes. Many disabled individuals could live independently outside of such facilities if more community services were available, they said. "The main thing is to get our people out of nursing homes," said Crosby King, a coordinator with the group.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
Lorraine M. Sheehan, a tenacious disability rights advocate who served in the General Assembly and had been Maryland's secretary of state, died of pneumonia complicated by cystic fibrosis Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Edgewater resident was 72. Family members said that Ms. Sheehan resolved to become involved in defending the rights of the disabled after physicians advised her to place a son diagnosed with autism and retardation in an institution. Years later, she fought successfully to close the Rosewood Center, a hospital for the severely disabled; the facility in Owings Mills closed in June.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
The summer dinner at City Cafe in Baltimore had several purposes, according to its organizers. "It's a combination of getting attention to our causes and celebrating the renovation [of City Cafe]," said Curt Decker, executive director of the National Disability Rights Network. "We are sort of new to the fundraising scene," said Virginia Knowlton, executive director of the Maryland Disability Law Center, scanning the room. "But given the crisis in legal services funding, we're very pleased with the wonderful turnout."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
Dale R. Reid, a civil rights attorney who excelled at disability issues, died of muscular dystrophy Thursday at his home in Marriottsville. He was 62. "He was a freedom fighter extraordinaire, who helped many disabled people get on track," said Gayle Hafner, an attorney and colleague at the Maryland Disability Law Center. "He metamorphosed from a mild-mannered country lawyer who used a wheelchair into a passionate, systems-changing agent." With a nearly $50,000 grant awarded to him from the Open Society Institute in 2003, Mr. Reid worked with Baltimore's elections board to make all polling places in the city accessible.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
A disability rights advocate who was hailed in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s State of the State address said yesterday that he feels "hurt" and "insulted" after learning that Department of Transportation officials tracked his movements and questioned whether he was getting preferential treatment from a state contractor. Joel D. Myerberg, head of the Maryland Disabilities Forum, said he was outraged by an e-mail in which the assistant to the No. 2 official of the department reported on his activities during a visit to Annapolis and questioned whether Yellow Transportation Inc. was giving him service it denies to others.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2003
Whether to educate the county's most disabled students in a school of their own, or with other youths, was the topic of a sometimes emotional hearing last night before the Howard County Board of Education. "Ian can't speak for himself. We have to come out and speak for [him]," said Michael Joyce, whose son attends Cedar Lane school in Columbia and is mute because of Batten Disease. Ian is also blind, immobile and eats with the help of a stomach tube. Special education parents and representatives of disabled-rights groups were split into two factions at the hearing, begging the school board to either keep or kill its plans to replace Cedar Lane school, which educates the county's most severely disabled students.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Eight disabled rights activists took over a conference room in a state office building in Baltimore for six hours yesterday before agreeing to leave. The activists, members of Maryland ADAPT, were demanding a meeting with Gov. Parris N. Glendening to discuss the placement of disabled people in nursing homes. Many disabled individuals could live independently outside of such facilities if more community services were available, they said. "The main thing is to get our people out of nursing homes," said Crosby King, a coordinator with the group.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
Lorraine M. Sheehan, a tenacious disability rights advocate who served in the General Assembly and had been Maryland's secretary of state, died of pneumonia complicated by cystic fibrosis Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Edgewater resident was 72. Family members said that Ms. Sheehan resolved to become involved in defending the rights of the disabled after physicians advised her to place a son diagnosed with autism and retardation in an institution. Years later, she fought successfully to close the Rosewood Center, a hospital for the severely disabled; the facility in Owings Mills closed in June.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
Frank and Nazzareno "Naz" Velleggia had served plenty of people in wheelchairs at Velleggia's, their 64-year-old restaurant in Little Italy. No one had ever complained about using a steep concrete ramp to a side service entrance, they said. "We expect you to clean the dishes," Naz Velleggia remembers joking as he wheeled patrons through the kitchen. "They got a kick out of it." That changed June 1, 1996, when Roberta Cepko dined at Velleggia's. Cepko says she had to wait as restaurant staff unlocked the side entrance, and her date had to push her up and down the ramp, which has no guardrails and ends in an abrupt 1-inch drop to the street.
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