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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
The summer dinner at City Cafe in Baltimore had several purposes, according to its organizers. "It's a combination of getting attention to our causes and celebrating the renovation [of City Cafe]," said Curt Decker, executive director of the National Disability Rights Network. "We are sort of new to the fundraising scene," said Virginia Knowlton, executive director of the Maryland Disability Law Center, scanning the room. "But given the crisis in legal services funding, we're very pleased with the wonderful turnout."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Gayle Hafner, a senior staff attorney of the Maryland Disability Law Center and a co-founder of Medicaid Matters Maryland who was an outspoken advocate for those with disabilities, died March 22 of a heart attack during an operation at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 60. "A premier civil rights attorney, Ms. Hafner sounded a voice for children in foster care and people with disabilities," said Lauren Young, director of litigation for the Maryland Disability Law Center.
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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Greater Baltimore Medical Center was accused in a federal lawsuit yesterday of discriminating against the blind and vision-impaired.The lawsuit, filed by the Maryland Disability Law Center on behalf of a blind patient and a blind advocate, contends that the Baltimore County hospital does not provide Braille and raised print or raised numbers on signs that designate permanent rooms, exits and stairways, and in other cases the aids aren't at federally required...
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2009
The summer dinner at City Cafe in Baltimore had several purposes, according to its organizers. "It's a combination of getting attention to our causes and celebrating the renovation [of City Cafe]," said Curt Decker, executive director of the National Disability Rights Network. "We are sort of new to the fundraising scene," said Virginia Knowlton, executive director of the Maryland Disability Law Center, scanning the room. "But given the crisis in legal services funding, we're very pleased with the wonderful turnout."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
The Maryland Disability Law Center is going to court today to try to force the state to address long-standing problems in the transit system for disabled riders. After years of feeling their complaints about the system have been ignored, center attorneys say they will file suit today in federal court in Baltimore to force the Maryland Transit Administration to comply with the law and start fixing a long list of maladies. Riders have recounted waiting hours for vans or other vehicles to pick them up, being stranded in the cold or dark and being taken on absurd, circuitous routes to their destinations, trips that sometimes end up taking two or three times longer than they should.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
A 45-year-old partially paralyzed Baltimore County man, who was arrested in 1995 on a series of minor charges including the theft of a tape cassette and a pair of shoelaces, remains locked up in a state hospital even though the charges against him were dropped six years ago. When John Dunkes protested and insisted that he should be released from his locked ward because the charges no longer existed, state mental health officials concluded he was delusional....
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
The Federal Transit Administration, which in 2003 chastised Maryland for providing poor public transit service to the disabled in the Baltimore region, has ended its monitoring of the state-run program because of improvements made since then. This week's decision came almost three years after the federal agency released a scathing report that helped form the basis of a lawsuit by the Maryland Disability Law Center on behalf of users of the Maryland Transit Administration's Mobility van and cab service.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
On May 10, 2006, LUCY SHUM; beloved daughter of Drs. Shu and Serey Shum; dear sister of Dr. John Shum and sister-in-law of Laura Shum and niece Madeline Shum and fiancee of Mr. Kevin Capinpin. Miss Shum was a graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and Hygiene and University of Maryland School of Law; employed by Maryland Disability Law Center. Friends may call at the family owned MITCHELL-WIEDEFELD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook Road), on Friday, 7 to 9 P.M. Viewing, Saturday 11:30 A.M., at St. Ignatius Church, 740 N. Calvert Street, followed by a Funeral Mass at 12 Noon.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
Dale R. Reid, a civil rights attorney who excelled at disability issues, died of muscular dystrophy Thursday at his home in Marriottsville. He was 62. "He was a freedom fighter extraordinaire, who helped many disabled people get on track," said Gayle Hafner, an attorney and colleague at the Maryland Disability Law Center. "He metamorphosed from a mild-mannered country lawyer who used a wheelchair into a passionate, systems-changing agent." With a nearly $50,000 grant awarded to him from the Open Society Institute in 2003, Mr. Reid worked with Baltimore's elections board to make all polling places in the city accessible.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
After a welcome hiatus, Gov. William Donald Schaefer is up to his old peevish tricks again. This time his ire has cost the state of Maryland $260,000 in federal funds that would have been used to protect the interests of the mentally ill.What annoyed the easily annoyed governor is that the legal group that would have received the funds is anathema to him. That's because the Maryland Disability Law Center is an aggressive protector of the rights of the...
NEWS
September 22, 2008
Unreported problems still plague Rosewood The Baltimore Sun created a misimpression in the article "Rosewood families speak out" (Sept. 15). The article said, "In recent months, no significant problems have come to light in the incident reports that Rosewood submits to the Maryland Disability Law Center." But if The Baltimore Sun had contacted MDLC prior to the publication of this article, we would have alerted the reporter to the recent annual survey of Rosewood Center performed by the state's Office of Health Care Quality, a survey mentioned in "Rosewood treatment improves in most areas" (Sept.
SPORTS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2008
Amid its flurry of final-day action, the General Assembly unanimously approved a bill requiring schools to provide disabled students access to sports programs, either among themselves or with able-bodied students. Under the measure known as the Fitness and Athletics Equity for Students with Disabilities, schools have three years to fully implement the requirements. "Once this bill is passed, you can't take it away," said Tatyana McFadden, an Atholton wheelchair athlete who testified at hearings last month in Annapolis.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun Reporter | October 11, 2007
A coalition of advocates for the developmentally disabled tried to turn up the pressure yesterday on Gov. Martin O'Malley to close Rosewood Center in Owings Mills. Several disabled activists in wheelchairs attempted to deliver a list of demands to the front gate of the governor's mansion in Annapolis but were turned back after a Department of General Services officer told them that they needed a permit to march. At a rally outside the State House attended by about 50 disabled citizens, activists said the state should shift Rosewood residents into smaller facilities and homes in the community over a year to 18 months and then close the center for the developmentally disabled.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Madison Park and Justin Fenton and Madison Park,Sun reporters | September 5, 2007
From the start, social workers were concerned for Seth. They were present in the emergency room when he was born and visited his mentally disabled parents' Abingdon apartment in the days after he went home to make sure he was receiving proper care. But after that, alleges the boy's maternal grandfather, Jesse Stacey, a retired Aberdeen police officer, the social workers didn't do enough. He complained to them that his daughter, Giovanna Mosley, and her husband, Richard, who was left with brain damage from a car accident, weren't properly caring for his grandson.
NEWS
August 18, 2007
Advocates for the disabled announced yesterday that 756 people are in line to share $1 million from the settlement of a Baltimore housing discrimination lawsuit. A victims' compensation fund was established as part of a landmark 2004 settlement in a lawsuit alleging that thousands of people with disabilities were intentionally or illegally excluded from public housing. Other terms of the settlement, worth more than $100 million, include development of more than 1,000 units of public housing accessible to people with disabilities and a program to help them obtain housing.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
Investigators have issued a scathing report criticizing a state-run Baltimore County residential center for the mentally disabled, recommending that federal funding be cut off if the center's staff does not stop patients from hurting themselves and abusing others. Wendy Kronmiller, director of the Office of Health Care Quality at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, wrote the citation letter to Rosewood Center in Owings Mills this week. The pattern of violations was so serious that investigators stopped their annual review in midstream to put Rosewood on notice, according to Kronmiller.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
Frustrated by the Baltimore school system's consistent failure to provide required services to special education students, an advocacy group for the disabled asked a federal judge yesterday to give a court-appointed team a say in key staffing decisions throughout the district.The Maryland Disability Law Center is asking that an oversight team consisting of state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, city Superintendent Walter G. Amprey and a representative of the law center review all proposed staffing decisions above the rank teacher.
NEWS
February 27, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has taken a swipe at the Maryland Disability Law Center by refusing to sign a form that would expedite release of $260,000 in federal funds to defend the rights of the mentally ill in state hospitals. The administration insists there is justification for this action, which is little more than a warning to MDLC to stop suing the state at every turn.Other legal services groups that represent individuals in state facilities have reached formal protocols with the Schaefer administration to resolve disputes.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2006
Two years after a landmark agreement with the city, advocates for the disabled joined with Baltimore officials yesterday to mail 40,000 notices to potential victims of past housing discrimination, urging them to take advantage of a $1 million compensation fund. "Do you feel the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) discriminated against you or your family due to a physical, developmental, emotional or mental disability between 1994 and 2004?" the notice says. "If you or a member of your family were treated unfairly because of a disability, you may be owed money from a `victim fund.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
On May 10, 2006, LUCY SHUM; beloved daughter of Drs. Shu and Serey Shum; dear sister of Dr. John Shum and sister-in-law of Laura Shum and niece Madeline Shum and fiancee of Mr. Kevin Capinpin. Miss Shum was a graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and Hygiene and University of Maryland School of Law; employed by Maryland Disability Law Center. Friends may call at the family owned MITCHELL-WIEDEFELD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook Road), on Friday, 7 to 9 P.M. Viewing, Saturday 11:30 A.M., at St. Ignatius Church, 740 N. Calvert Street, followed by a Funeral Mass at 12 Noon.
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