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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
President Barack Obama is expected to soon nominate a new head of the Social Security Administration, replacing an incumbent appointed by his predecessor, George W. Bush, but the White House is mum on who should take the helm at the agency, which faces voluminous backlogs, potential insolvency and a raft of critics. Social Security Commissioner Michael J. Astrue's six-year term expires Jan. 19. His successor must be confirmed by the Senate, in a process that Sen. Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat, expects will take a couple of months from the hearings to a vote.
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BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | May 29, 2005
Q. I collect a pension and Social Security, but I also work part time. I recently was injured off the job and have been out of work since February. Can I apply for disability, or am I disqualified because of my retirement benefits? A. Receiving a pension doesn't automatically disqualify you from disability benefits. Instead, your eligibility could depend on whether you signed up for the benefit. You waive your right to disability benefits if you decided against paying the average 60 cents a week that employees contribute toward disability insurance, said Jon Sullivan, a New York Workers' Compensation Board spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2011
Ever so slowly, the unemployed are getting hired. And if you're one of them, the next task will be to get your finances back on track. The latest government figures show that the median length of unemployment is 51/2 months — enough time without a paycheck to do a lot of damage. By then, you might have wiped out savings, dipped into retirement accounts or racked up credit card debt. Your credit record could be tarnished if you were late paying bills or defaulted. Getting back on sound financial footing will take some time — and a switch in mind-set.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | October 15, 1995
If you think working as an independent contractor means you're free and self-reliant, don't kid yourself. Typically, this work arrangement makes you more of a slave than you'd be in a staff job. As a rule, you get no benefits, no paid time off for family or medical emergencies, and no protection against discrimination. Many of the workers accepting these gigs lately would be better off as full-time employees.Companies like independent contractors -- sometimes called consultants, free-lancers, contingency workers, or temps-- because they cost less than employees.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Congress was urged yesterday to increase aid to the disabled by billions of dollars even though the Republican majority has been moving to scale back disability programs run by the Social Security Administration.The call for more assistance came from a panel of the National Academy of Social Insurance, a think tank headed by former Social Security Commissioner Robert M. Ball. The new or expanded benefits would cost more than $17 billion over five years.Aimed at encouraging the disabled to work, the proposals include a new tax credit for the disabled working poor, vouchers so recipients can purchase vocational rehabilitation services from private vendors, and a 44 percent increase -- from $500 to $720 a month -- in the amount some recipients can earn without losing benefits.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Black people with serious ailments have been much more likely than whites over the past 30 years to be rejected for benefits under Social Security disability programs, according to a federal study.The study by the General Accounting Office showed that from the initial claim through the appeals process, black people have a more difficult time obtaining benefits from the two largest federal programs for people with severe disabilities.The programs provide $43.2 billion annually in disability checks to millions of workers and their families.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 29, 1999
Readers reacted with sympathy, empathy, mild outrage and charity (checks and cash) to the story (TJI, Nov. 15) of Michael Younger, the Eastern Shore contractor who broke his back in a fall last spring and whose family has been struggling to get by, with only meager support from the government. The story demonstrated how America's vaunted safety net has big holes.At a time when politicians, Democratic and Republican, brag about the effectiveness of welfare reform, government policy gives limited support to Americans trying to move up from poverty.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1992
TUESDAY, 1 p.m. Senate Finance, Senate Presidential WingSB 14 Life Insurance -- Charitable Institutions; SB 69 Long-Term Care Insurance -- Minimum Regulatory Requirements; SB 230 Health Maintenance Organizations -- Pharmaceutical Services; SB 269 Health Insurance -- Child Wellness Services Benefits; SB 291 Health Insurance -- Pre-existing ConditionsHouse Constitutional and Administrative Law, Room 140 Lowe Office BuildingHB 457 Economic Growth and Resource...
BUSINESS
By GREGORY KARP and GREGORY KARP,MORNING CALL | May 14, 2006
Not all families are the same when it comes to insurance needs. Established families with middle-age parents and older children need more of some kinds and less of others. "As the value of your home changes, as your assets increase, as your children approach college age and your financial situation changes, quite likely your insurance needs are going to change at the same time," said Roger Sevigny, insurance commissioner of New Hampshire. Here are some tips for evaluating insurance needs for an established family: Life Now is a great time for established families to re-examine their life insurance, for a couple of reasons.
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Anyone who thought it would be easy to truly reform welfare -- or even to root out the old devils of waste, fraud and abuse -- has surely been chastened by The Sun's illuminating four-day series on the Social Security Administration's disability programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Disability Insurance (DI).Entire families who earn a comfortable livelihood by simply remaining nonproductive; children who are scolded for achieving at school because it would endanger their disability payments; addicts whose skids into the gutter are greased by government checks; immigrants who are systematically coached to lie to the government so they can get a monthly handout -- these and other horror stories chronicled by reporters John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner cannot be blamed solely on criminal minds determined to bilk the taxpayers.
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