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By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 23, 1992
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- Having built a successful dental practice in the mountain community of Wrightwood, Calif., Mary Samida decided to protect her investment six years ago by taking out a disability-insurance policy.It was a good thing, because last December, increasing pain in her back caused by ruptured discs forced Ms. Samida out of her profession of 15 years."It was kind of a jolt," she said. "I'm having to sell my practice and immediately quit dentistry."The shock of ending her career so suddenly has been greatly eased by a disability-insurance policy that will pay Ms. Samida the equivalent of her monthly take-home pay every month for the rest of her life.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Jerry Bailey can look back on a Hall of Fame jockey career that featured 5,892 victories but also the searing memory of 17 fractures, including a broken back, jaw and collarbone, and several busted ribs. Yet Bailey considers himself lucky. He never sustained an injury that kept him off the track more than several months. And unlike many jockeys, he could afford disability insurance designed to fill the gap between what riders need after life-altering accidents and what they receive from racetrack policies.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 1991
Although being disabled can wreak more financial havoc than death, many workers have no disability insurance. Others have group insurance provided by their employers but are not familiar with their benefits.The Evening Sun wants to know whether you have disability insurance. If so, have you examined your policy so you know what to expect if you can't perform your job? Do you think employers should be required to offer group disability insurance to all their workers?To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 3, 2013
The government in Britain recently did something interesting. It asked everyone receiving an "incapacity benefit" -- a disability program slowly being phased out under new reforms -- to submit to a medical test to confirm they were too disabled to work. A third of recipients (878,000 people) didn't even bother and dropped out of the program rather than be examined. Of those tested, more than half (55 percent) were found fit for work, and a quarter were found fit for some work. But that's Britain, where there's a long tradition of gaming the dole.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Jerry Bailey can look back on a Hall of Fame jockey career that featured 5,892 victories but also the searing memory of 17 fractures, including a broken back, jaw and collarbone, and several busted ribs. Yet Bailey considers himself lucky. He never sustained an injury that kept him off the track more than several months. And unlike many jockeys, he could afford disability insurance designed to fill the gap between what riders need after life-altering accidents and what they receive from racetrack policies.
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,1991, Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 7, 1991
Four years ago, Bob Page's car was hit head-on by a drunk driver. The drunk driver died. Page survived -- but suffered 15 broken bones and a bruised heart.For five months after his release from the hospital, Page had to use a wheelchair, depending on his parents, friends and employees to keep Replacements Ltd. going. His Greensboro, N.C., firm, which specializes in supplying customers with obsolete china, crystal and silver patterns, survived his personal disaster and has flourished.But not all small-business owners are as lucky as Page.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | May 28, 1993
With American families pressured by the financial demands of the 1990s, no one likes to think about worst-case scenarios.Disability, however, is a difficult possibility worth pondering.The sale of disability insurance is on the rise these days, as more breadwinners decide it's better to be safe than sorry. Self-employed individuals are buying it, as are workers concerned about the restricted nature of disability coverage offered by their employers.Disability insurance is designed to pay monetary benefits when an illness or injury prevents the earning of an income.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | November 30, 1998
I'M WATCHING a video, recorded in February 1997 for training purposes by Aetna U.S. Healthcare, one of the nation's largest health insurance companies. It should scare everyone who has company-paid health or disability insurance. You're at more risk than you think of not getting the care you need.Under current law, most patients in most states cannot sue their company plans for damages. Too bad if you die because your plan delayed or denied treatment. Too bad if you're refused disability benefits you should have had. The plan isn't liable.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | June 5, 2005
No work, no money: Without a job, most of us would be in the poorhouse. Consider what would happen if an illness or accident prevented you from working permanently. How would you survive a lifetime without income? In the prime of youth, it's tough to think about disability insurance, which essentially replaces your wages if you become incapable of working. But at age 25, there's a 40 percent chance you'll become disabled before turning 65, according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 18, 1994
Women who would like to buy a disability insurance policy still have time to act before new pricing models raise their costs."It's not too late, but better do it now," said Richard Misrok, a consultant with the Economic Growth Group, insurance industry advisers in New York.Saying that women have higher disability claim rates, insurers are gradually adopting new rate schedules that result in higher premiums for women than for men.Under the new rates, virtually all women buying a policy outside a group plan will see price increases ranging from 1 percent to a whopping 50 percent.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 3, 2013
Those of you paying attention have noticed that the Obama administration is actually doing what it promised: transforming America into a gigantic welfare state. And there are plenty of takers willing to cash in on it and "get mine. " Numbers don't lie. Forty percent of the population was on some form of public assistance when the president took office; today, that number stands at 55 percent. And fraud is rampant. "Exhibit A" is the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
President Barack Obama is expected to soon nominate a new head of the Social Security Administration, replacing an incumbent appointed by his predecessor, George W. Bush, but the White House is mum on who should take the helm at the agency, which faces voluminous backlogs, potential insolvency and a raft of critics. Social Security Commissioner Michael J. Astrue's six-year term expires Jan. 19. His successor must be confirmed by the Senate, in a process that Sen. Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat, expects will take a couple of months from the hearings to a vote.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Richard Franklyn Kirchner, a World War II veteran and retired Social Security Administration official, died Jan. 7 of Lewy body dementia at the Harmony Hall assisted-living facility in Columbia. He was 86. Mr. Kirchner was born in New York City and raised there and in Monticello, N.Y., where his father recuperated from tuberculosis. After graduating from DeWitt Clinton High School in New York City in 1943, he was drafted into the Army and served as a hospital corpsman in England and Europe.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2011
Ever so slowly, the unemployed are getting hired. And if you're one of them, the next task will be to get your finances back on track. The latest government figures show that the median length of unemployment is 51/2 months — enough time without a paycheck to do a lot of damage. By then, you might have wiped out savings, dipped into retirement accounts or racked up credit card debt. Your credit record could be tarnished if you were late paying bills or defaulted. Getting back on sound financial footing will take some time — and a switch in mind-set.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | March 26, 2008
When I hear my fellow baby boomers gleefully talk about their elaborate plans to retire ASAP, head for the Tuscan hills, or otherwise continue their lifelong quest for "self-actualization," I have to bite my tongue. It's not that I'm all work and no play. But there's just something - make that lots of things - wrong, in general, with retiring at 55, 62 or even 65. I would go so far as to call it profoundly selfish and unpatriotic. Dropping out of the work force while still in one's prime means ending one's contributions to America's strength, mortgaging our children's and grandchildren's future and leeching trillions of taxpayer dollars from the economy.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | July 29, 2007
I read that this is the last year when proceeds from an IRA can be donated directly to a charity. But is this a good idea? Apparently no tax is owed on the money that goes to the charity, but you don't get a charitable deduction for the money you are giving to the charity. Which is preferable? No tax or a deduction? - Elaine Hopkins, Peoria, Ill. No tax is better for several reasons, said James Lange, a Pittsburgh attorney and accountant. The reader is referring to a provision available for tax years 2006 and 2007 that lets individual retirement account owners age 70 1/2 and older transfer up to $100,000 tax-free from their IRAs to eligible charities.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 1994
Companies that sell disability insurance to individuals are reporting a sharp rise in claims for certain ailments that were little known 10 years ago, leaving the insurers with losses of hundreds of millions of dollars. The companies also are reporting a big increase in claims by doctors, once among the most prized of the insurance industry's clients.In response, insurers are adopting new strategies, from offering less generous benefits to pulling out of the business.Three million people, many of them self-employed, are covered by individual disability policies that generate annual revenues for insurers of $3.5 billion.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | February 25, 2007
Think about college tuition, health care and especially your electric bill, and it's easy to assume that prices only move in two directions: up and waaay up. But if you haven't been paying close attention, you might not have noticed that one important financial product is significantly cheaper these days: term life insurance. Industry experts estimate that term premiums have fallen 40 percent or more in the past decade alone. "This is great news," says Gary Schatsky, a financial planner in New York.
BUSINESS
By GREGORY KARP and GREGORY KARP,THE MORNING CALL | May 21, 2006
Once the children are out of the house and you wind down your full-time working years, your insurance needs shift. You'll need more of some kinds of insurance and less of others. And you'll need some patience and diligence. At no other time in life does insurance get more complicated than retirement, when you're considering the baffling ins and outs of Medicare, long-term care insurance and annuities. Here are tips for empty-nesters and seniors: Life As you approach retirement, and especially during retirement, your need for life insurance diminishes rapidly.
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