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By Tawn Nhan and Tawn Nhan,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 20, 1992
Beginning Sunday, all but the smallest companies face a new set of federal regulations, as the first provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act take effect. In short, the law prohibits denying a job or promotion to someone because of a disability, and it requires employers to make the workplace accessible.Business owners, fearing the cost of compliance and the impact on hiring policies, are dreading the deadline. But employers need not hire less qualified employees nor spend a lot of money to accommodate disabled employees, say disabilities rights advocates.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
The number of coveted parking spaces available to the able-bodied on crowded downtown streets is about to shrink as Baltimore begins reserving metered spots for disabled drivers. Earmarking 200 metered spaces in the central business district is the first step in an 18-month plan to reserve 10 percent of spaces citywide. Officials hatched the plan to accommodate disabled drivers and combat the theft of handicapped placards — which until now have let drivers park anywhere in the city for free and have been a favorite target of thieves.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | July 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In early January, a symbol of one of the most sweeping civil rights laws in American history appeared at a restaurant on the shores of Spa Creek in Annapolis: a simple wooden ramp.The $900 ramp, which replaced a pair of low steps that divided the split-level dining room at Carrol's Creek Cafe, made its debut three weeks before the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) went into effect. Hailed as a "declaration of independence" for the nation's 43 million disabled citizens -- including some 390,000 in Maryland -- the law required that all businesses be made accessible by Jan. 26."
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 13, 2014
Harford Transit LINK Administrator James Ports has been selected as the 2013 Administrator of the Year by the Transportation Association of Maryland Inc. Ports was praised for his dedication to improving mobility and access to economic opportunity for Harford's citizens. He was acknowledged as a strong leader and innovator who was greatly admired by all who come in contact with him. He was further recognized for the successful rebranding of Harford Transit LINK, which helped increase awareness and ridership on the system.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Justice Department is proposing regulations to spell out steps that businesses such as restaurants, stores and theaters would have to take to comply with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.The rules would require businesses that function as public accommodations to remove barriers in existing facilities and make other reasonable changes to give disabled persons equal access.Stricter standards, requiring a "high degree of convenient access" for the disabled, would be imposed for facilities being altered and buildings that open after Jan. 26, 1993.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - Foreign cruise ships operating from U.S. ports may not discriminate against disabled passengers, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday. The 5-4 decision held that the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to foreign-flagged cruise ships and bars them from charging higher fares to disabled passengers. More than 7 million passengers annually board these ships and depart from U.S. ports, the court pointed out. And although Americans make up the majority of people who travel aboard cruise ships, most of the vessels fly foreign flags.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A group of seven moderate Senate Republicans announced yesterday yet another attempt to fashion a civil rights bill that would be acceptable to the Bush administration. The White House, however, appeared to reject it.Sen. John C. Danforth, the Missouri Republican who has been leading the group's search for a compromise bill ever since President Bush vetoed last year's measure, said the senators were introducing a measure that would apply to minorities and women the exact anti-discrimination language in a law approved last year by Mr. Bush to protect disabled workers' rights.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
The number of coveted parking spaces available to the able-bodied on crowded downtown streets is about to shrink as Baltimore begins reserving metered spots for disabled drivers. Earmarking 200 metered spaces in the central business district is the first step in an 18-month plan to reserve 10 percent of spaces citywide. Officials hatched the plan to accommodate disabled drivers and combat the theft of handicapped placards — which until now have let drivers park anywhere in the city for free and have been a favorite target of thieves.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Toys "R" Us, alleging the company broke the law when staff at its Columbia store refused to provide a sign-language interpreter for a job applicant who is deaf. The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, says the retailer discriminated against the woman, Shakirra Thomas, after she applied for a position at the store in 2011. It alleges the company violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires employers to provide "reasonable accommodations" for job applicants and workers with disabilities.
NEWS
January 26, 1993
Carroll County commissioners yesterday approved a plan outlining how the county's hiring practices comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act.Jimmie Saylor, director of the county's Department of Human Resources and Personnel Services, said the plan outlines "what we do to accommodate the disabled."Mr. Saylor also said the plan describes how the county complies with the Americans With Disabilities Act, "as well as many other laws."The plan notes, for instance, that the county's recruitment office, as well as the County Office Building, is accessible to the disabled, and that county officials use Community Access TV, radio and other methods to advertise openings on the staff.
NEWS
By Christopher Neely, Capital News Service | October 30, 2013
The judge in the ongoing trial of a the man accused of sexually abusing female students at the Maryland School for the Deaf implemented an uncommon rule in the courtroom Tuesday. After the jury was finalized and prior to opening statements, Judge William V. Tucker of the Circuit Court for Howard County forbade any sign language communication by people in the courtroom, either between spectators or between spectators and trial participants. The only exception was for the four official courtroom interpreters and those communicating to the interpreters.  Speaking to members of the audience, he also said "facial gestures to any witnesses or participants" were forbidden during the trial, threatening to remove anyone who violated the temporary rule.  The rule was initiated due to the number of key players in the case against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III who are deaf, including the defendant, victims and some witnesses.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 30, 2013
Harford County-based Upper Chesapeake Health System is the subject of a complaint and lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of a former employee who claims she was discriminated against because of a disability and retaliated against when she sought federal relief. The civil suit was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and alleges the non-profit health care company "failed to provide a reasonable accommodation, fired, and later refused to rehire a pulmonary function technologist because of her disability and in retaliation for her requesting an accommodation and complaining about discrimination," according to a news release issued Friday by EEOC's Baltimore office.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
National advocacy groups for people with Down syndrome are seeking an independent investigation into the January death of a Frederick County man after off-duty sheriff's deputies tried to remove him from a movie theater. Robert Ethan Saylor, 25, suffocated on Jan. 12 after three Frederick County sheriff's deputies attempted to remove him from the Theater 9 Westview Cinemas in Frederick. He died later at a local hospital. "We want to just find out more information to see if Ethan's rights as an individual with a disability were violated.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore's oldest cab company and the Maryland Transit Administration are updating their fleets for wheelchair-using customers, replacing small buses and minivans with an SUV-like vehicle that provides a smoother, more civilized ride. The MV-1 is designed specifically to transport disabled passengers and already is in use in cities such as Pittsburgh, Chicago and Dallas. Built in Indiana, it is the only production vehicle that meets Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. Yellow Cab and sister company 1010 Sedan purchased 10 MV-1s and began using them this week.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Toys "R" Us, alleging the company broke the law when staff at its Columbia store refused to provide a sign-language interpreter for a job applicant who is deaf. The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, says the retailer discriminated against the woman, Shakirra Thomas, after she applied for a position at the store in 2011. It alleges the company violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires employers to provide "reasonable accommodations" for job applicants and workers with disabilities.
NEWS
By Daniel Erchick | July 31, 2012
On July 26, 1990, when President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on the lawn of the White House, I was too young be in attendance, or even understand the impact that this monumental law would have on the United States by protecting the rights and freedoms of people with disabilities. People like me. About two weeks ago, an email popped into my inbox explaining that the Senate had scheduled a hearing to discuss U.S. ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992
WHO TO CALLAgencies that provide free advice on the Americans with Disabilities Act:GENERAL INFORMATIONU.S. Department of Justice ADA Hotline: (202) 514-0301. TDD: (202) 514-0381Job Accommodation Network ADA Hotline: (800) 232-9675Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: (800) 800-EEOC. Same number for TDD.Maryland Governor's Office for Handicapped Individuals: 333-3098Mid-Atlantic Disability & Business Technical Assistance Center: (800) ADA-4999. TDD: (703) 525-3268.TransCent: (301) 424-2002.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and Jeff Seidel and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2010
Four years ago, Atholton High's Tatyana McFadden changed the landscape of high school sports for athletes with disabilities. On Tuesday, the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association changed its laws to accommodate those athletes. New language was added Tuesday to the MPSSAA bylaws, allowing students with disabilities to participate in school sports programs as long as they meet preexisting eligibility requirements, are not ruled to present a risk to themselves or others, and do not change the nature of the game or event.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating allegations that Baltimore County government has harassed employees over their medical conditions and forced some out of their jobs, according to court documents and people who have spoken with federal investigators. The inquiry stems from accusations that have dogged the county for several years. It follows two court cases in which the county had to pay a combined $625,000 to former employees over similar claims, and a third case that is scheduled for a settlement conference next month.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake shared a stage with the other candidates for mayor for the first time Thursday night as she made her initial appearance at a campaign forum. While the other candidates have discussed schools, crime and economic development at more than half a dozen forums this election season, Rawlings-Blake chose to make her debut at an event focused on issues concerning people with disabilities. The other candidates — including Clerk of Court Frank M. Conaway Sr., activist Vicki Ann Harding, former City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers, state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh and former city planning director Otis Rolley — delivered their remarks extemporaneously, but Rawlings-Blake read her opening and closing statements.
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