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NEWS
June 18, 2014
After reading the article, "On the job (and under the radar " (June 15), regarding the "sub-minimum" wage offered disabled workers, it's clear why people with disabilities are unemployed or underemployed. A culture of low expectations and low pay - not to mention transportation needs - keep people with disabilities from the workforce. If half-pay for half-productivity is such a great idea, I wonder why we reserve this practice only for people with disabilities. What if teachers who take twice as long to grade papers only earned half their pay?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2014
The Sun's investigation into the death of a disabled boy under the care of LifeLine Inc. is a wake-up call for Maryland state agencies ( "Maryland lawmakers, child advocates seek probe into oversight of troubled group home," July 14). Maryland needs to analyze how so many problems arose in one small agency without a state response. Other children and adults with developmental disabilities are at risk until the state improves its quality oversight and coordination among service agencies.
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NEWS
June 16, 2014
As a disabled American, I have been anxiously watching the Maryland Democratic gubernatorial debates and reviewing each candidate's disabilities platforms. I was surprised that despite recent Congressional hearings on the death of Frederick resident Ethan Saylor that neither Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's nor Attorney General Doug Gansler's platforms discuss disabled Americans. It leaves me wondering if they know much, if anything, of the struggles of the disabled. In contrast, I did find that Del. Heather Mizeur's way of wanting to educate the state on what it is like to be disabled was refreshing.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
So I come to find out today that in a stroke of brilliance, our fine city of Baltimore has decided that in an effort to stop criminals from breaking into the cars and vans of people with disability placards, they will completely eliminate the free parking privilege for all the disabled ( "New rules require disabled drivers to pay for handicap spots," July 10). You see, up until July 10th, people with disabilities who had a placard could park at a meter within the city for free.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
I would like to applaud the wonderful op-ed by Alan Guttman regarding Head Start and the sequester budget cuts ("What can't be measured," March 6). It is so important that people understand the critical role of Head Start in educating our children. This key program is responsible for the success of so many. Few realize just how much early learning factors into a child's ability to succeed in later academics. You have done our community a service by highlighting this. For all of the great things I could say about the article, I found one thing wanting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Gayle Hafner, a senior staff attorney of the Maryland Disability Law Center and a co-founder of Medicaid Matters Maryland who was an outspoken advocate for those with disabilities, died March 22 of a heart attack during an operation at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 60. "A premier civil rights attorney, Ms. Hafner sounded a voice for children in foster care and people with disabilities," said Lauren Young, director of litigation for the Maryland Disability Law Center.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
With her seeing-eye dog by her side, Denna Lambert works to help ensure that up-and-coming scientists and engineers with disabilities can see a future at NASA. Lambert, the disability program manager at Goddard Space Flight Center, said she is answering President Barack Obama's call for greater diversity and inclusion in the federal government. When children, teens and young adults see more and more professionals with disabilities in the federal workforce, she said, they will know what they can achieve — and how they can contribute.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 24, 2013
The Harford County Commission on Disabilities hosted its annual Employment Recognition Luncheon Thursday at the Maryland Golf and Country Clubs in Bel Air, honoring several employers, individuals and organizations. The luncheon's main purpose is to "celebrate the accomplishments and achievements of people with disabilities who overcome obstacles in their pursuit of excellence," according to Committee Co-Chair Niki Biggs. "Their accomplishments are especially significant in this difficult job market.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
I have loved horse racing for 60 years and have been a thoroughbred horse owner off and on since 1985. It is because I love the industry and want to see it thrive that I must write that while the owners of California Chrome felt they were treated better at Pimlico than at Churchill Downs, the management of Pimlico and Laurel race courses should take a hard look at improving service to their customers if they are to grow and frankly, survive ( ...
NEWS
June 29, 2014
Congratulations to The Sun for its balanced reporting of the many complexities of the subminimum wage issue and its acknowledgment that a phase-out needs to be gradual so that no individual loses opportunity or earnings ("'Subminimum wage' for disabled workers called exploitative," June 14). The Arc Baltimore, whose mission is, in part, is to expand and diversify employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is encouraged at the progress we've seen for those in jobs earning at or above minimum wage and at companies that are in the community, not in segregated workshops.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
I feel that there must be a better solution to the disability placard problem than to place the burden on the disabled ( "New rules require disabled drivers to pay for handicap spots," July 10). Disabled folks do not have the strength or mobility to obtain change from sources near their parking meters. They may need to return to the meter several times to deposit coins. A trip to Baltimore city attractions would be futile. Parking tickets would increase for the disabled through no fault of their own. The theft of disability placards to be sold to selfish and insensitive people is a criminal act affecting our most vulnerable citizens.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
The death of a severely disabled foster child earlier this month while under the care of a group home in Anne Arundel County that Maryland health regulators were in the process of shutting down inevitably raises the question of whether the boy's life could have been saved if state officials had acted more quickly. The state has launched three separate investigations into 10-year-old Damaud Martin's death, but the results may not be known for months. Regardless of whether anything could have changed Damaud's fate, though, the investigative reporting by The Sun's Doug Donovan into the troubled history of LifeLine raises real questions about whether the state's oversight of such care providers is adequate to protect some of the state's most vulnerable young people.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Orioles right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez is heading to the 15-day disabled list with a right ankle injury, manager Buck Showalter announced before Friday's game against the New York Yankees. The club will recall right-hander Kevin Gausman from Triple-A Norfolk to take Jimenez's place. Jimenez was slated to start Saturday's game, but right-hander Chris Tillman likely will start now in Jimenez's place on regular rest. Gausman likely will start for the Orioles in Sunday's series finales.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The recent death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child at an Anne Arundel County group home was just the latest in a series of problems at LifeLine, the state contractor that has been paid millions in taxpayer funds to care for "medically fragile" individuals, a two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun has found. Even before Damaud Martin's death on July 2, LifeLine had struggled for years to provide around-the-clock care for its residents — adults and foster children often confined to a bed or wheelchair by paralysis, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
A 10-year-old disabled foster child died last week while under the care of a group home in Anne Arundel County that Maryland health regulators were in the process of closing down, state Health Secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein confirmed Thursday. Regulators, he said, are conducting investigations into the July 2 death at the Laurel-area home operated by LifeLine Inc., a state contractor that had provided round-the-clock care for such children - and that was recently warned it would lose its license for having inadequate staff to meet the "health and safety needs of each child" and other issues.
NEWS
July 6, 2014
The challenge and threat to the disabled, workers and public sector unions following the Supreme Court's decision in Harris v. Quinn ( "Public unions at risk," July 1) is real. Yet again the court has taken action abridging protections afforded working people who have done so much to sustain what remains of our ever shrinking middle class. For years, labor unions have been under increasing pressure, and it is no coincidence that the decline in union membership across the private and public sectors has coincided with the greatest income inequality we've seen since the Great Depression.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
When Christopher Booher opens his email at work, a robotic voice rapidly reads the words to him. As a blind employee at the National Institute of Mental Health in Rockville, Booher relies on the screen-reading software. But the 33-year-old says it's not just technology that makes him comfortable at work. When he interviewed for a job as a grants manager four years ago, the supervisor was open to working with someone who is blind. "That sort of drew me toward this," Booher said.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck, For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Trent Stroup is a man of action. Two years ago, when the Towson-area father of three saw that his then 7-year-old daughter Addie was regressing significantly in the community public school she attended, he didn't waste any time acting. Addie, diagnosed with the rare brain disorder Aicardi syndrome before she was a year old, has epilepsy and autism. A switch in schools between kindergarten and first grade resulted in a serious downward spiral, according to her father. She lost many skills she had previously acquired, such as writing her name, and she strongly resisted attending school.
NEWS
June 29, 2014
Congratulations to The Sun for its balanced reporting of the many complexities of the subminimum wage issue and its acknowledgment that a phase-out needs to be gradual so that no individual loses opportunity or earnings ("'Subminimum wage' for disabled workers called exploitative," June 14). The Arc Baltimore, whose mission is, in part, is to expand and diversify employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is encouraged at the progress we've seen for those in jobs earning at or above minimum wage and at companies that are in the community, not in segregated workshops.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
In response to The Sun's editorial, "Pennies per hour" (June 23), it needs to be clarified that The Arc Maryland does not hold a 14(c) certificate and does not pay Marylanders, including those with disabilities, subminimum wages. As an advocacy organization, The Arc Maryland does not include jobs that "calculate wages based on a formula that compares their employees' productivity against that of non-disabled workers performing the same tasks," as the editorial stated. The mission of The Arc Maryland is to "work to create a world where children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have and enjoy equal rights and opportunities.
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