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By ELIZABETH SCHUETT | July 15, 1993
Gibsonburg, Ohio. -- My cousin, Ernest Malcolm Parker III, got sent home from nursery school for swearing. The Girl Scouts gave me my walking papers for the same reason. And my son showed an early aptitude for four-letter words. It must be genetic.I decided something had to be done. I didn't want Kristofor to become a social leper, unwelcome in all the better sandboxes in Newnan, Georgia.We struck a deal. ''If you can't write the word and spell it correctly then you can't say it. OK?'' ''OK,'' he agreed.
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NEWS
October 10, 2012
As this page has devoted much ink to criticizing Republicans in Congress for hardening their positions on matters of federal tax and budget policy to the point where compromise is impossible, it is beyond disappointing to see a leading Senate Democrat engaging in similar behavior. Whether it's equivalent or not, Sen. Charles E. Schumer went too far this week when he rejected any possibility of lower tax rates for the wealthy. Mind you, we understand where Senator Schumer is coming from.
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FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 15, 1991
If your image of shock radio is merely a steady stream of sexual and scatological references and dirty words, think again.At least in the case of the Howard Stern show, there's more to it than that.To be sure, there's plenty of the above on Mr. Stern's 6 a.m.-to-11 a.m. show -- enough so that last year the Federal Communications Commission levied a $6,000 fine against the company that broadcasts it, charging a 1988 Christmas program violated decency standards. The fine is currently under administrative appeal.
NEWS
November 12, 2011
Columnist Marta H. Mossburg's views in "Governor, don't tell us where to live" (Nov. 9) are distorted. True, life in the year 1900 was simpler is some ways, but to bad-mouth the concept of "sustainable" development in 2011 is simply naïve. Whether we like it or not, with a state population that will inevitably grow, we must plan for sustainability in all its dimensions if Maryland to continue to rank high nationally in livability. And why does she think of all this is an attack on Republicans?
FEATURES
By Donald P. Myers and Donald P. Myers,Newsday | May 17, 1993
Kathleen Kelly was in an ice cream parlor the other day with her daughter when some boys breezed in on a blue streak. "Everything was f-this and f-that," said Ms. Kelly. "I'm no prude, but I finally turned to them and said, 'Gentlemen, please!' They looked at me as if I had nine heads."Four-letter words are flying everywhere these days -- on the street and at the mall and in the hall at school, in rock and rap music, on television and in the movies, in fancy bars and subway cars."Dirty words used to come in a plain brown wrapper, you know, in private, and now everywhere you go you're assaulted by them," said Ms. Kelly, a Long Island, N.Y., elementary school principal.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
You may not know it, but you are adept at lip reading. That's the only conclusion we can draw from new censorship guidelines crafted by lawyers for the Public Broadcasting Service, whose 354 member stations - including Maryland's own MPT - could face hefty fines if they allow you to see someone even mouthing salty language in one of their prime-time shows. Reacting to the Federal Communications Commission's newfound muscle in its campaign against what it considers to be indecent programming and profane language, the lawyers maintain that simply bleeping over certain words is no longer sufficient.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 22, 2008
Walter P. Dent Jr., a retired sales representative and gardener, died Monday in his sleep at the home of his caregiver in Belcamp. He was 98. Mr. Dent was born in Oakley, St. Mary's County, and was raised in Baltimore and Washington. During World War I, he moved to Fort Fisher, N.C., to live with his mother's grandfather. After his father returned from World War I, he moved with his family to Philadelphia. He later moved to Oakley, where he graduated from River Springs High in 1927. After earning a bachelor's degree in history from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1932, he worked in sales for Crowell Collier Publishing Co. From 1959 until he retired in 1981, he sold fire-extinguishing equipment for Fireline Corp.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 9, 2005
Yesterday, the day he turned 77 years old, Charles I. Ecker had a piece of birthday cake and ducked all incoming flak. He was having a swell time. It was such a swell time that he got on the telephone and told a funny story to a newspaper guy he's known for quite a few years. "I went to the doctor for my physical," Ecker said. "Doctor said, `You're in such good shape, I bet you feel like a 30-year-old.' I told him, `Where is she?'" The story has the ring of sweetness coming from a man of Ecker's age and stature.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 23, 1997
When I heard that Richard Berry, the man who wrote "Louie Louie," had died, I saidWell, I can't tell you, in a family newspaper, what I said. But it was not a happy remark. It was the remark of a person who realizes he'll never get to thank somebody for something.I remember the day I first heard "Louie Louie." I was outside my house, playing basketball with my friends on a "court" that featured a backboard nailed to a tree next to a geologically challenging surface of dirt and random rocks, which meant that whenever anybody dribbled the ball, it would ricochet off into the woods and down the hill, which meant that our games mostly consisted of arguing about who would go get it.So we spent a lot of our basketball time listening to a transistor radio perched on a tree stump, tuned to WABC in New York City.
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | February 4, 1993
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The football stadium is packed. The home team heads toward a score and then a referee's bad call stops the momentum. Some fans respond in unison with an obscenity.A mother drags her two young children through a grocery store. One keeps lagging behind, picking items from shelves. Finally, the mother yells at the child. Her coarse vocabulary echoes down the aisle.There's a widespread feeling in America that our language is, to put it politely, going to heck.Nowadays, profanity and vulgarity slip out during normal discourse.
NEWS
April 5, 2010
I think that the characterization of the lobbyist occupation as "dirty" is unfair (Debate on dirty word: 'lobbyist,'" April 4). Lobbyists play an important role in our political process. Their advocacy on behalf of a client's of a point of view on pending legislation and on needed legislative changes serves a valuable role in the process of deliberating new and existing laws in our society. There are always many points of view, and for interested parties to hire a spokesperson on their behalf who has access to law makers is not "dirty" at all. What is "dirty," in my opinion, is when our elected representatives take money from lobbyists for election campaign support, take boondoggle trips to exotic locations under the guise of a seminar and the like, and in general promise a quid pro quo arrangement with the lobbying firms in return for special consideration on matters which benefit the lobbying entity.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
Democrats in Maryland, worried about a punishing election-year climate, want voters thinking of something more damning than "incumbent" when they go to the polls. Their preferred enemy: the lobbyist. The strategy became clear last week when former Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. confirmed that he wants to unseat Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley. The message from O'Malley's campaign: Voters will have a choice between a sitting governor who made tough decisions in a down economy and an ousted opponent turned high-priced lobbyist for corporate interests.
NEWS
March 24, 2010
Douglas G. Smith's commentary in Tuesday's edition of The Sun ("Government expansion will break the budget," March 23) is a remarkable piece of conservative logic-mashing and hackneyed blood-boiling rhetoric. It's a disaster of contradictions, assumptions and falsities. But the thing that stands out most is his repetition of a certain word. A word, in the conservative conscience, that's fouler than brimstone, which is exactly why it's repeated so often. To Mr. Smith and hard-core conservatives, the new government health law is nothing more than an entitlement program.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON and MIKE PRESTON,mike.preston@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
At the beginning of the season, when the Ravens won two in a row, this town was already buzzing about playoffs. It was way too early. But now after the Ravens beat the Houston Texans, 41-13, on Sunday, you can actually start thinking about the p-word. Go ahead, let it roll off your tongue. The picture is starting to become a little clearer. If the Ravens had lost to the Texans, there would be few scenarios remaining that had the Ravens in the postseason, even with the Indianapolis Colts knocking off the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 22, 2008
Walter P. Dent Jr., a retired sales representative and gardener, died Monday in his sleep at the home of his caregiver in Belcamp. He was 98. Mr. Dent was born in Oakley, St. Mary's County, and was raised in Baltimore and Washington. During World War I, he moved to Fort Fisher, N.C., to live with his mother's grandfather. After his father returned from World War I, he moved with his family to Philadelphia. He later moved to Oakley, where he graduated from River Springs High in 1927. After earning a bachelor's degree in history from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1932, he worked in sales for Crowell Collier Publishing Co. From 1959 until he retired in 1981, he sold fire-extinguishing equipment for Fireline Corp.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
You may not know it, but you are adept at lip reading. That's the only conclusion we can draw from new censorship guidelines crafted by lawyers for the Public Broadcasting Service, whose 354 member stations - including Maryland's own MPT - could face hefty fines if they allow you to see someone even mouthing salty language in one of their prime-time shows. Reacting to the Federal Communications Commission's newfound muscle in its campaign against what it considers to be indecent programming and profane language, the lawyers maintain that simply bleeping over certain words is no longer sufficient.
NEWS
By JAMES McCARTNEY | January 19, 1995
Washington. -- In the latest issue of American Heritage magazine, the history periodical, more than 50 historians, writers, public figures and journalists were asked what they considered the most important, or interesting, ways in which America has changed in the last 40 years, and why.Not surprisingly, Bill Clinton didn't make the cut as a true or significant instrument of change. Neither did George Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Richard Nixon, Lyndon Johnson, John F. Kennedy or even Dwight D. Eisenhower.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland | April 16, 2000
Talk with enough people, and your files expand and your notebooks run over. Here's some spillage: From Rich Grantham, president of the Elkridge Youth Organization, hoping the public shows up at 7: 30 p.m. Tuesday at the George Howard Building in Ellicott City for the annual County Council hearing on the county's proposed capital, or construction, budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1: "Usually, it's only people who are against things that go....
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 9, 2005
Yesterday, the day he turned 77 years old, Charles I. Ecker had a piece of birthday cake and ducked all incoming flak. He was having a swell time. It was such a swell time that he got on the telephone and told a funny story to a newspaper guy he's known for quite a few years. "I went to the doctor for my physical," Ecker said. "Doctor said, `You're in such good shape, I bet you feel like a 30-year-old.' I told him, `Where is she?'" The story has the ring of sweetness coming from a man of Ecker's age and stature.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2005
It did not take long for the Manly Man Mutiny to begin. Just as some of their brethren began feeling comfortable enough to share pointers about a new diet or where to get super-soft but nonpleated khakis or a really good manicure, the counter-revolution began. Suddenly, it's cool to be a man again. Not just any kind of man, but a meat-eating, beer-drinking, belching, football-watching, T-shirt-and faded-jeans-wearing, "you should count yourself lucky I use deodorant" kind of man. The metrosexual backlash has begun.
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