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Dirty Water

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NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | September 22, 1991
Dorothy Zeun won't drink the water at her place anymore -- she's seen it come out of the pipes dark brown one too many times.Even when the water's clear, she drinks bottled water, preferring not to takea chance on what might be in her county-provided water.And when she washes clothes, she checks first to make sure the water is clear. She almost ruined her daughter's nursing uniforms once when she didn't check and the white uniforms came out covered with dark brown stains.Over the years, Zeun and her family have learned to live with the dark brown water they get at their house, on average, at least once a month.
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EXPLORE
By Pat van den Beemt | July 13, 2011
I just finished writing a story about a local band, RailAway, whose album “Dirty Water” will be released at the Recher Theatre on July 22. The five guys in their early 20s were so thrilled to have a story done on them that they fell over backward to help me. I listened to them play, then interrupted their rehearsal to sit each one down and ask questions. I was struck by several things. First, they were polite. Their attitude could have been “We're way too cool to be wasting our time talking with a grandma who doesn't even know how to read music” but instead their demeanor was “We will answer all your questions and help you any way we can. We'll even offer you a band T-shirt.” I was also impressed with the fact that they managed to get this CD done all on their own. Nobody's parents bankrolled them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 15, 2004
That's not an easy place to discuss. It harbors many ghosts, and the pain from certain events that took place there hasn't necessarily lessened with time. Mississippi is one of the poorest states in the Union, with low employment, poor schools, shabby social services. And its past is dark and rich. Back in '55, Emmett Till, the hazel-eyed Chicago boy who had come down to visit his uncle that summer, floated to the top of the Tallahatchie River without a face. He had been beaten beyond recognition and shot for allegedly whistling at a white woman.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 10, 2011
It is a great notion - cleaning up the rivers that flow through the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin. Ambitious volunteers, led by a schoolteacher named Brian Schilpp, already have pulled tons of trash and tires out of Back River, long used as a dumping ground for people on the southeast side of the city and Baltimore County. And now, on the other side of town, we'll soon see a new effort to turn the polluted, heavy-metal Patapsco into a clean and swimmable waterway, from its headwaters to the Baltimore harbor.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 18, 1993
I recently spent a long, intimate session with a "P" trap.A P trap is a piece of pipe that sits under the drains of most sinks. It looks like a sideways letter P, but it also looks like a backward J. So you can ask for it by either name at hardware stores, and either way you can be corrected.I had seen a P trap on television. It appeared as "the source of the clog" in commercials for drain cleaners. In these commercials, the drain cleaner liberated gunk from a curved piece of pipe, the P trap, and sent the clog fleeing down a connecting drainpipe.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 20, 1998
Executive privilege covers a multitude of sins, which are not the same things as crimes.Bawlmer is usefully convenient to D.C., most recently as the closest place to find really dirty water that needs to be cleaned up.The idea of bombing Iraqis is proving less popular than was hoped.Cheer up. Spring training is begun. Lacrosse cannot be far behind.Pub Date: 2/20/98
NEWS
August 3, 2008
Rotary International has awarded a $17,000 matching grant to the Rotary Clubs of Greater Severna Park and Nairobi Industrial in Kenya to provide a Kenyan primary school with furniture, sports equipment, uniforms, health camps and a 2,500-gallon water tank for collecting rainwater. Kenya Connect, a nonprofit based in Silver Spring, is assisting the Rotarians. Kenya Connect has raised over $117,000 through the efforts of schoolchildren in the United States, resulting in water tanks, classroom renovations, solar-powered learning resource centers, fences, uniforms and sports equipment for impoverished schools in Wamunyu, Kenya.
EXPLORE
By Pat van den Beemt | July 13, 2011
I just finished writing a story about a local band, RailAway, whose album “Dirty Water” will be released at the Recher Theatre on July 22. The five guys in their early 20s were so thrilled to have a story done on them that they fell over backward to help me. I listened to them play, then interrupted their rehearsal to sit each one down and ask questions. I was struck by several things. First, they were polite. Their attitude could have been “We're way too cool to be wasting our time talking with a grandma who doesn't even know how to read music” but instead their demeanor was “We will answer all your questions and help you any way we can. We'll even offer you a band T-shirt.” I was also impressed with the fact that they managed to get this CD done all on their own. Nobody's parents bankrolled them.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 29, 2004
ONE OF THE biggest temptations a weekend repair guy faces is the urge to "take this baby apart." The "baby" begging to be dissembled can be anything from a lamp to a lawnmower that is not functioning as it should. Recently I had an itch to dismember a dishwasher that would not drain. I had read the repair manuals. I had downloaded the diagrams of dishwasher innards and spread the schematics out on the floor. I had positioned my tools and my trouble light. The testosterone was pumping as I picked up the slip-joint pliers, poked my head under the kitchen sink and looked for parts to pry off. Then I heard a voice, perhaps my inner plumber, saying "Whoa, bubba !
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem and Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
baghdad -- Five cases of cholera have been reported among children in Iraq in the past three weeks, a worrying sign as temperatures rise and the war leaves sewage and sanitation systems a shambles. All of the cases were among children younger than 12 in the southern city of Najaf, and all were reported by medical officials on alert for signs of the potentially lethal ailment, Claire Hajaj of UNICEF said yesterday. Cholera, which is spread through bacteria in contaminated water, is easily treatable but can cause rapid dehydration and death if not treated.
NEWS
August 3, 2008
Rotary International has awarded a $17,000 matching grant to the Rotary Clubs of Greater Severna Park and Nairobi Industrial in Kenya to provide a Kenyan primary school with furniture, sports equipment, uniforms, health camps and a 2,500-gallon water tank for collecting rainwater. Kenya Connect, a nonprofit based in Silver Spring, is assisting the Rotarians. Kenya Connect has raised over $117,000 through the efforts of schoolchildren in the United States, resulting in water tanks, classroom renovations, solar-powered learning resource centers, fences, uniforms and sports equipment for impoverished schools in Wamunyu, Kenya.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | May 25, 2008
Fourth-grader Corey Brooks dipped the small white strip of test paper into the glass vial of cloudy water taken from the school parking lot. "Look at all the sediment in the bottom," said one of his lab partners, Brady Meixsell. A few minutes later, the fourth-grader and his peers at Sandymount Elementary School in Finksburg had determined the water's nitrogen and pH levels, and reasoned that its lack of clarity would mean a drop in the production of algae and zooplankton, minute animal life that floats in water.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem and Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
baghdad -- Five cases of cholera have been reported among children in Iraq in the past three weeks, a worrying sign as temperatures rise and the war leaves sewage and sanitation systems a shambles. All of the cases were among children younger than 12 in the southern city of Najaf, and all were reported by medical officials on alert for signs of the potentially lethal ailment, Claire Hajaj of UNICEF said yesterday. Cholera, which is spread through bacteria in contaminated water, is easily treatable but can cause rapid dehydration and death if not treated.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 29, 2004
ONE OF THE biggest temptations a weekend repair guy faces is the urge to "take this baby apart." The "baby" begging to be dissembled can be anything from a lamp to a lawnmower that is not functioning as it should. Recently I had an itch to dismember a dishwasher that would not drain. I had read the repair manuals. I had downloaded the diagrams of dishwasher innards and spread the schematics out on the floor. I had positioned my tools and my trouble light. The testosterone was pumping as I picked up the slip-joint pliers, poked my head under the kitchen sink and looked for parts to pry off. Then I heard a voice, perhaps my inner plumber, saying "Whoa, bubba !
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 15, 2004
That's not an easy place to discuss. It harbors many ghosts, and the pain from certain events that took place there hasn't necessarily lessened with time. Mississippi is one of the poorest states in the Union, with low employment, poor schools, shabby social services. And its past is dark and rich. Back in '55, Emmett Till, the hazel-eyed Chicago boy who had come down to visit his uncle that summer, floated to the top of the Tallahatchie River without a face. He had been beaten beyond recognition and shot for allegedly whistling at a white woman.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Sixth-graders from Perryville Middle School in Cecil County have been battling it out for the designation of "Most Water Saved." From March 10 to March 14, nine sixth-grade classrooms participated in the water conservation contest, said Susan Obleski, director of communications for the Susquehanna River Basin Commission. The contest was designed to target home water use and required pupils to record their daily use. "Students will learn that because they do it themselves that they can make a difference," Obleski said.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Sixth-graders from Perryville Middle School in Cecil County have been battling it out for the designation of "Most Water Saved." From March 10 to March 14, nine sixth-grade classrooms participated in the water conservation contest, said Susan Obleski, director of communications for the Susquehanna River Basin Commission. The contest was designed to target home water use and required pupils to record their daily use. "Students will learn that because they do it themselves that they can make a difference," Obleski said.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 20, 1991
Evil-smelling effluent bubbling from a factory into a bay. Is that what you see when you think of water pollution?Twenty years ago, that picture would have been pretty accurate. But factories and municipalities have largely cleaned up their act -- and their effluent, the technical term for waste water.Now when it comes to polluting surface waters, the biggest villains are us. You, me, Mr. Perennially Tinkering Under Cars next door, Ms. Weed and Feed the Lawn Every Month Whether It Needs It or Not on the corner, and the folks across the street who paved their yard so they wouldn't have to mow it.The problem is runoff.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 24, 2000
Yesterday morning when moguls were in their office moguling and arbitrageurs were in cyberspace arbitraging, I was in the laundry room rooting for the washer's spin cycle to kick in. A few hours earlier, the washer had appeared to be dead in the water - the dirty water. Late Thursday night I discovered the washer's distress while engaging in a drastic domestic clean-up action, one spurred by the fact that my wife would soon be returning from an out-of-town trip. As some guys do, I had let housekeeping matters slide during my wife's absence.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 20, 1998
Executive privilege covers a multitude of sins, which are not the same things as crimes.Bawlmer is usefully convenient to D.C., most recently as the closest place to find really dirty water that needs to be cleaned up.The idea of bombing Iraqis is proving less popular than was hoped.Cheer up. Spring training is begun. Lacrosse cannot be far behind.Pub Date: 2/20/98
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