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By RICHARD O'MARA | February 6, 1994
Santa Fe, Argentina.-- I try to return often to this town where I lived when I first came to Latin America nearly 30 years ago, for the perspective: It encourages me to re-examine some of the elements of my point of view.There is a small plaza in Santa Fe with an aviary called the park of the pigeons. The park has benches, a statue of a mother and child, a garden in the shade of an immense tree. Now and then pigeons rise out of the aviary, circle the plaza then reascend. The sound of their wings is metronomic.
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NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2005
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Argentina's Supreme Court overturned two amnesty laws yesterday that prevented the prosecution of hundreds of military officers, soldiers and police linked to the country's "Dirty War," in which thousands of people were killed in the 1970s and 1980s. The ruling paves the way for the revival of hundreds of prosecutions and civil suits that had been dropped for nearly two decades, legal experts and government officials said. Government sources and human rights activists said new charges naming as many as 300 defendants - most of them retired military and police officers - could be filed in the coming weeks.
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NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2005
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Argentina's Supreme Court overturned two amnesty laws yesterday that prevented the prosecution of hundreds of military officers, soldiers and police linked to the country's "Dirty War," in which thousands of people were killed in the 1970s and 1980s. The ruling paves the way for the revival of hundreds of prosecutions and civil suits that had been dropped for nearly two decades, legal experts and government officials said. Government sources and human rights activists said new charges naming as many as 300 defendants - most of them retired military and police officers - could be filed in the coming weeks.
NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,NEWSDAY | October 14, 2004
MEXICO CITY - In a victory for human rights groups, Mexico's highest court agreed yesterday to review a case seeking to charge a former president with genocide for a 1971 student massacre during this country's "dirty war" against leftist dissidents. The Supreme Court will not judge the merits of the charges against ex-President Luis Echeveria and 13 other former government officials in connection with one of Mexico's most infamous massacres. Rather, it will determine whether a lower-court judge was wrong to reject the case on grounds that the statute of limitations had expired.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2003
MEXICO CITY - It has been more than two decades since Miguel Nazar Haro last fixed his cold blue eyes on terrified prisoners - eyes that still haunt the survivors. Now the inquisitor of Mexico's "dirty war" is facing his own interrogators. A brutal era is on trial, and they want him to explain how several hundred leftist detainees disappeared in the 1970s and early 1980s. But those eyes are as impassive and unblinking as ever, giving nothing away. Nazar, 78, is a defiant, unrepentant target of the first criminal case filed by President Vicente Fox's special prosecutor for past atrocities by the state.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- Somewhere there is always a list of people under suspicion. They float around, these lists, pop up in unexpected places; they continue to do damage long after their compilers are gone from the scene.Carol E. Robertson says she has never had any illusions about perfect democracy, in this country or any other. But that hadn't prepared her for her recent unpleasant surprise -- when her invited guest from Argentina was denied entry to the United States and, according to him, mistreated by immigration agents in Miami.
NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,NEWSDAY | October 14, 2004
MEXICO CITY - In a victory for human rights groups, Mexico's highest court agreed yesterday to review a case seeking to charge a former president with genocide for a 1971 student massacre during this country's "dirty war" against leftist dissidents. The Supreme Court will not judge the merits of the charges against ex-President Luis Echeveria and 13 other former government officials in connection with one of Mexico's most infamous massacres. Rather, it will determine whether a lower-court judge was wrong to reject the case on grounds that the statute of limitations had expired.
NEWS
May 5, 1995
The round of confessions to atrocities during the "dirty war" of 1976-83 has been healthy for Argentina's soul. President Carlos Menem had already pardoned or amnestied every possible perpetrator from both sides, government and revolutionary. What's at stake now are truth and conscience, not justice or revenge. The "disappeared," whether they be 10,000 or 30,000, are being accounted for, the disappearances explained.The single act that began the healing process was an acknowledgment by the army chief of staff, Lt. Gen. Martin Balza, that the army "employed illegitimate methods, including the suppression of life, to obtain information," in the dirty war. He said they killed and tortured.
NEWS
September 30, 1996
REBELLION broke out in Guatemala in 1961 and still goes on. Cuban-backed Marxists seeking to overturn the military regime installed by the CIA seven years earlier found support among Guatemala's Indian majority.The results so far are perhaps 140,000 Guatemalans dead and one Nobel Peace Prize, in 1992, to the Indian rights crusader and victim of army atrocities, Rigoberta Menchu. People born when this war began, having survived, are 35 years old.The peace signed in Mexico City on Sept. 19 caps five years of United Nations mediation efforts and follows six months of de facto cease-fire.
NEWS
April 15, 2002
Jose "Pepe" Siderman, 90, who fled his native Argentina during the military regime's "Dirty War" and who later won a landmark human rights case against the South American nation, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. A former businessman, Mr. Siderman was kidnapped and tortured by Argentina's military government, which also looted his family's property and assets valued at more than $25 million. Mr. Siderman was one of the survivors of the brutal period of military rule that began in 1976 and claimed more than 10,000 lives.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2003
MEXICO CITY - It has been more than two decades since Miguel Nazar Haro last fixed his cold blue eyes on terrified prisoners - eyes that still haunt the survivors. Now the inquisitor of Mexico's "dirty war" is facing his own interrogators. A brutal era is on trial, and they want him to explain how several hundred leftist detainees disappeared in the 1970s and early 1980s. But those eyes are as impassive and unblinking as ever, giving nothing away. Nazar, 78, is a defiant, unrepentant target of the first criminal case filed by President Vicente Fox's special prosecutor for past atrocities by the state.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
REPORTS FROM Aceh, the resource-rich Indonesian province on the northern tip of Sumatra, are grimmer by the day. With the only cease-fire in the 27-year war of independence between the Free Aceh Movement and Jakarta breaking down May 19 after just five months, the infamously brutal, increasingly powerful Indonesian army moved in to crush the 5,000 rebel guerillas - quickly followed by claims of executions, torture and school burnings and discoveries of...
NEWS
April 15, 2002
Jose "Pepe" Siderman, 90, who fled his native Argentina during the military regime's "Dirty War" and who later won a landmark human rights case against the South American nation, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. A former businessman, Mr. Siderman was kidnapped and tortured by Argentina's military government, which also looted his family's property and assets valued at more than $25 million. Mr. Siderman was one of the survivors of the brutal period of military rule that began in 1976 and claimed more than 10,000 lives.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- Somewhere there is always a list of people under suspicion. They float around, these lists, pop up in unexpected places; they continue to do damage long after their compilers are gone from the scene.Carol E. Robertson says she has never had any illusions about perfect democracy, in this country or any other. But that hadn't prepared her for her recent unpleasant surprise -- when her invited guest from Argentina was denied entry to the United States and, according to him, mistreated by immigration agents in Miami.
NEWS
By Joseph E. Mulligan | December 22, 1996
During the 1980s, Honduras received hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. military aid to serve as a staging ground against the Sandinista government of Nicaragua and against the FMLN guerrilla forces of El Salvador. Hundreds of people "disappeared" in Honduras, victims of military units such as the CIA-trained Battalion 316.A case in point is that of an American Roman Catholic priest, James Carney, who worked as a Jesuit in Honduras for 18 years, supporting peasant organizations, until he was expelled by the government in 1979.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Stepping up its drug war in Latin America, the United States is arming Colombia's military and police to fight a war against leftist insurgents who also are involved in narcotics.The Clinton administration is donating helicopters, observation planes, patrol boats and other military gear to Colombia, one of the hemisphere's most violent countries and the source of 80 percent of the cocaine in the United States.The U.S. equipment is part of a $112 million package of anti-drug aid for Latin America that was announced last month.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
REPORTS FROM Aceh, the resource-rich Indonesian province on the northern tip of Sumatra, are grimmer by the day. With the only cease-fire in the 27-year war of independence between the Free Aceh Movement and Jakarta breaking down May 19 after just five months, the infamously brutal, increasingly powerful Indonesian army moved in to crush the 5,000 rebel guerillas - quickly followed by claims of executions, torture and school burnings and discoveries of...
NEWS
September 30, 1996
REBELLION broke out in Guatemala in 1961 and still goes on. Cuban-backed Marxists seeking to overturn the military regime installed by the CIA seven years earlier found support among Guatemala's Indian majority.The results so far are perhaps 140,000 Guatemalans dead and one Nobel Peace Prize, in 1992, to the Indian rights crusader and victim of army atrocities, Rigoberta Menchu. People born when this war began, having survived, are 35 years old.The peace signed in Mexico City on Sept. 19 caps five years of United Nations mediation efforts and follows six months of de facto cease-fire.
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