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Dirty Shame

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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 12, 2003
Big Ethel's out there. Pat Moran's gonna find her. Moran, Baltimore's own Emmy-winning casting director (for Homicide: Life On the Street) is in the midst of casting John Waters' latest, A Dirty Shame, a timeless comedy of sexual addiction and amnesia-induced depravity. She's filled about 20 roles so far - about 40 percent of what's required (not including some 600 extras) - but her biggest challenge remains. "We're looking for a white woman to play the role of Big Ethel, Tracey Ullman's [character's]
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
If you saw a disheveled, clearly despondent 66-year-old man hitchhiking, would you pick him up? Would you pick him up if you realized he was John Waters? Two springs ago, Baltimore's most unrepentant degenerate set out on a mission of discovery. Beginning on Charles Street, not far from his home, Waters would hitchhike all the way to his San Francisco condo, following Interstate 70 most of way. There would be little in the way of advance planning; he'd be relying totally on his thumb and the kindness of strangers.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2004
A Dirty Shame is a tale of marauding sex addicts who wage a pitched battle against the morally upright citizens of Harford Road. It's also a celebration of sexual rapaciousness, sexual perversity, sexual obsessions ... in fact, just about everything sexual, except the sex act itself (which, despite the film's NC-17 rating, is never actually shown). To director John Waters, it's just like the old days on York Road, back at Baltimore's Rex Theatre, a longtime XXX stalwart of the local sexploitation scene . "When I was growing up," Waters says, "I was going to the foreign art films, I was going to the independent movies, but I also went to the Rex. All these things were kind of a big influence on me."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Grace Arnold Nalls, a retired commercial artist and stage performer, died of congestive heart failure July 30 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Homeland resident was 82. Born Grace Lucille Arnold in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park, she was a 1947 Eastern High School graduate and performed in school plays. She received a diploma from the Maryland Institute College of Art and earned a bachelor's degree from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. As a young woman, she worked as a commercial artist at the old Reliable Stores on West Baltimore Street.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2004
SUN SCORE ***1/2 Every once in a while, the complaints start. John Waters, his longtime fans will groan, is going mainstream. If A Dirty Shame is mainstream cinema, then heaven help the rest of the directors in the world. Because this is the kind of film only John Waters could make, a perfect distillation of Waters' off-kilter sensibilities. It's not to everyone's tastes, but then it was never meant to be. Like almost all of Waters' works, it rewards those who appreciate his world view with a celebration of the mundane as filtered through the perverse, a funhouse mirror reflection of middle-class values and mores that's equal parts tribute and lambaste.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
Last week's question How do you think the Ravens will fare this season? 5.9 percent Worse than last year 17.6 percent The same as last year 26.5 percent Will win the wild card 41.2 percent Back to the Super Bowl 8.8 percent Don't care, I'm a Redskins fan 34 votes This week's question Which September release is at the top of your must-see list? Cellular A Dirty Shame The Forgotten The Motorcycle Diaries Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow Wimbledon All of the above Other Vote at www.baltimoresun.
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By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2006
Park City, Utah-- --As he scheduled an appeal with the Motion Picture Association of America ratings board of the NC-17 placed upon his comedy A Dirty Shame, a woman on the phone told filmmaker John Waters that the association would be serving cookies and asked that he please not get crumbs on the floor. When the group declined to rescind the NC-17 rating, Waters said, he wanted to smash the cookies to bits. Waters is one of the most engaging sources in Kirby Dick's documentary This Film Is Not Yet Rated, a buzzed-about peek into the secretive MPAA ratings board, which makes its official Sundance premiere tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 7, 2003
Think of John Waters as a racy Wizard of Oz. Generations of American storytellers have chronicled provincial misfits and artists leaving their homes and finding their true colors in Los Angeles, New York or San Francisco. But Waters does the reverse, attracting international talent to his native Baltimore and convincing them that Charm City and the Emerald City are fully equal. This fall he did it again while shooting A Dirty Shame. Conceptually, it's a hoot. In the 1979 gang classic The Warriors, Walter Hill pictures a teen-age wild bunch called "the Warriors" and sends them running for their lives through the streets of New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 30, 2004
Native Baltimorean Paul DeBoy hasn't done a lot of acting in his hometown in recent years, but suddenly area audiences can see a lot of him -- all of him, in fact, since he's one of the few actors who appears in the nude in John Waters' new movie, A Dirty Shame. In the movie, DeBoy and actress Susan Allenbach play husband and wife swingers. It was DeBoy's first Waters movie, as well as his first on-screen nude scene. What surprised him most about Waters, he says, was that "he's so shy. We finished doing the nude scene, which both Susan and I were angsting about, and [Waters]
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 10, 2011
Grace Arnold Nalls, a retired commercial artist and stage performer, died of congestive heart failure July 30 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Homeland resident was 82. Born Grace Lucille Arnold in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park, she was a 1947 Eastern High School graduate and performed in school plays. She received a diploma from the Maryland Institute College of Art and earned a bachelor of arts from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. As a young woman, she worked as a commercial artist at the old Reliable Stores on West Baltimore Street.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 21, 2006
What's with the Domino Sugars sign lately? Baltimore's nightlight hasn't been blinking on at sundown as usual, say several spies who live along the waterfront and count on the neon icon to herald the end of the day - and prop up inflated housing values. ("Domino sign views!") The sign should start glowing about 9 p.m. this time of year. But I'm told it was dark after 10 several nights late last week. Domino officials initially insisted the sign was working as usual. But then I got Jim Cochran, engineering manager, on the phone.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2006
Park City, Utah-- --As he scheduled an appeal with the Motion Picture Association of America ratings board of the NC-17 placed upon his comedy A Dirty Shame, a woman on the phone told filmmaker John Waters that the association would be serving cookies and asked that he please not get crumbs on the floor. When the group declined to rescind the NC-17 rating, Waters said, he wanted to smash the cookies to bits. Waters is one of the most engaging sources in Kirby Dick's documentary This Film Is Not Yet Rated, a buzzed-about peek into the secretive MPAA ratings board, which makes its official Sundance premiere tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 30, 2004
Native Baltimorean Paul DeBoy hasn't done a lot of acting in his hometown in recent years, but suddenly area audiences can see a lot of him -- all of him, in fact, since he's one of the few actors who appears in the nude in John Waters' new movie, A Dirty Shame. In the movie, DeBoy and actress Susan Allenbach play husband and wife swingers. It was DeBoy's first Waters movie, as well as his first on-screen nude scene. What surprised him most about Waters, he says, was that "he's so shy. We finished doing the nude scene, which both Susan and I were angsting about, and [Waters]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2004
A Dirty Shame is a tale of marauding sex addicts who wage a pitched battle against the morally upright citizens of Harford Road. It's also a celebration of sexual rapaciousness, sexual perversity, sexual obsessions ... in fact, just about everything sexual, except the sex act itself (which, despite the film's NC-17 rating, is never actually shown). To director John Waters, it's just like the old days on York Road, back at Baltimore's Rex Theatre, a longtime XXX stalwart of the local sexploitation scene . "When I was growing up," Waters says, "I was going to the foreign art films, I was going to the independent movies, but I also went to the Rex. All these things were kind of a big influence on me."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
Last week's question How do you think the Ravens will fare this season? 5.9 percent Worse than last year 17.6 percent The same as last year 26.5 percent Will win the wild card 41.2 percent Back to the Super Bowl 8.8 percent Don't care, I'm a Redskins fan 34 votes This week's question Which September release is at the top of your must-see list? Cellular A Dirty Shame The Forgotten The Motorcycle Diaries Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow Wimbledon All of the above Other Vote at www.baltimoresun.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2004
SUN SCORE ***1/2 Every once in a while, the complaints start. John Waters, his longtime fans will groan, is going mainstream. If A Dirty Shame is mainstream cinema, then heaven help the rest of the directors in the world. Because this is the kind of film only John Waters could make, a perfect distillation of Waters' off-kilter sensibilities. It's not to everyone's tastes, but then it was never meant to be. Like almost all of Waters' works, it rewards those who appreciate his world view with a celebration of the mundane as filtered through the perverse, a funhouse mirror reflection of middle-class values and mores that's equal parts tribute and lambaste.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2004
John Waters wasn't the most anxious person at last night's premiere of his new movie, the NC-17-rated A Dirty Shame. His father was. "I'm waiting very nervously," John Waters Sr. said, as he waited in the lobby of the Senator Theatre for his son's movie to begin. "I'm told it's raunchy, but it's funny. I'm told you laugh your way through it. That's what I'm hoping." By the time the movie had played for five minutes, the elder Waters was doubtless reassured; everybody in the theater seemed to be laughing - loudly.
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