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Dirty Rice

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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Dirty rice doesn't require a washing machine or vacuum to clean up. Like magic, it disappears the minute it is served. The recipe request came from S. A. LaMonte of Baltimore who wrote, "my Creole grandmother had a Louisiana recipe called dirty rice which was made from chicken giblets, celery, rice etc., and I'd love to have it."James Dieterle from Longview, Wash., a long way from Creole country, responded. He noted his recipe came from Justin Wilson's "Homegrown Louisiana Cookin' " cookbook.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Are you ready for some gumbo? At 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 3, when the Ravens take on the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII, much of Baltimore will be watching, either from their stadium seats in New Orleans or here at home. Ravens fans not lucky enough to have tickets to the big game still have plenty of reason to celebrate at home in Baltimore, and they can do so in N'awlins style. According to local chefs with Louisiana roots, the Big Easy's cuisine is tailor-made for parties.
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By Frances Grandy Taylor and Frances Grandy Taylor,Hartford Courant | July 21, 1993
As a boy, Wiley Mullins spent his time watching his mother cook in their home in Tuscumbia, Ala. Her specialties were staples of the African-American soul-food tradition: dirty rice, collards and turnip greens, fried chicken and catfish, black-eyed peas and butter beans.At home in his kitchen in Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Mullins whips up his own version of dirty rice: browned ground hamburger, white rice and about a half cup of seasoning with water added. In a matter of minutes, a steaming plate of spicy rice is ready to enjoy.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - They came to Paradise Avenue from opposite directions. Sarah Bell, 56, originally from San Jose, Calif., arrived from the West and took up residence on the row of trailers a block from the water because Paradise Avenue sounded like a place where she could decorate her home with ceramic angels and grow old in God's grace. Christine Mullins, 59, was from the East, the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. And she came to live on Paradise Avenue only because Gulfport happened to be where her car broke down on the way to Vegas five years ago. For a year they worked at the same restaurant and took the same bus route, the Beachcomber, but didn't talk much.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 7, 2002
Q. I am the Weekend Grill King, and I want to know what vegetables to grill along with my steaks. A. Dear Your Royal Highness, the Weekend Grill King: Sir, my humble answer is that with you being the king and all, you have the privilege to grill any vegetables you like. Just about all vegetables are great for grilling, except maybe peas, though some are easier than others. Why don't you begin with something simple like zucchini, yellow squash, and some nice, big portobello mushrooms?
FEATURES
By Copely News Service | May 2, 1993
Most of the rest of the world fills out its meals with rice. We eat rice once in awhile and plain at that. But rice can be the star of the show.Imagine rice with a faintly lemon accent standing by fish! Think of rice with bell pepper, kernels of corn, yellow with turmeric and dancing with the fire of hot pepper sauce and/or cayenne. Or do as the folks in Louisiana do: Toss in mushrooms, nuts and a leek, call the result dirty rice and make a whole meal of it.Any day, every day, is right for rice as the recipes below, adapted from "For Goodness' Sake" by Terry Joyce Blonder (Firefly Books)
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Are you ready for some gumbo? At 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 3, when the Ravens take on the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII, much of Baltimore will be watching, either from their stadium seats in New Orleans or here at home. Ravens fans not lucky enough to have tickets to the big game still have plenty of reason to celebrate at home in Baltimore, and they can do so in N'awlins style. According to local chefs with Louisiana roots, the Big Easy's cuisine is tailor-made for parties.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - They came to Paradise Avenue from opposite directions. Sarah Bell, 56, originally from San Jose, Calif., arrived from the West and took up residence on the row of trailers a block from the water because Paradise Avenue sounded like a place where she could decorate her home with ceramic angels and grow old in God's grace. Christine Mullins, 59, was from the East, the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. And she came to live on Paradise Avenue only because Gulfport happened to be where her car broke down on the way to Vegas five years ago. For a year they worked at the same restaurant and took the same bus route, the Beachcomber, but didn't talk much.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 7, 2002
Q. I am the Weekend Grill King, and I want to know what vegetables to grill along with my steaks. A. Dear Your Royal Highness, the Weekend Grill King: Sir, my humble answer is that with you being the king and all, you have the privilege to grill any vegetables you like. Just about all vegetables are great for grilling, except maybe peas, though some are easier than others. Why don't you begin with something simple like zucchini, yellow squash, and some nice, big portobello mushrooms?
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Dirty rice doesn't require a washing machine or vacuum to clean up. Like magic, it disappears the minute it is served. The recipe request came from S. A. LaMonte of Baltimore who wrote, "my Creole grandmother had a Louisiana recipe called dirty rice which was made from chicken giblets, celery, rice etc., and I'd love to have it."James Dieterle from Longview, Wash., a long way from Creole country, responded. He noted his recipe came from Justin Wilson's "Homegrown Louisiana Cookin' " cookbook.
FEATURES
By Frances Grandy Taylor and Frances Grandy Taylor,Hartford Courant | July 21, 1993
As a boy, Wiley Mullins spent his time watching his mother cook in their home in Tuscumbia, Ala. Her specialties were staples of the African-American soul-food tradition: dirty rice, collards and turnip greens, fried chicken and catfish, black-eyed peas and butter beans.At home in his kitchen in Bridgeport, Conn., Mr. Mullins whips up his own version of dirty rice: browned ground hamburger, white rice and about a half cup of seasoning with water added. In a matter of minutes, a steaming plate of spicy rice is ready to enjoy.
FEATURES
By Copely News Service | May 2, 1993
Most of the rest of the world fills out its meals with rice. We eat rice once in awhile and plain at that. But rice can be the star of the show.Imagine rice with a faintly lemon accent standing by fish! Think of rice with bell pepper, kernels of corn, yellow with turmeric and dancing with the fire of hot pepper sauce and/or cayenne. Or do as the folks in Louisiana do: Toss in mushrooms, nuts and a leek, call the result dirty rice and make a whole meal of it.Any day, every day, is right for rice as the recipes below, adapted from "For Goodness' Sake" by Terry Joyce Blonder (Firefly Books)
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Attention, America: You're invited to Bill and Al's Excellent Lawn Party, a massive come-as-who-you-are thing that attempts to define and celebrate who we are.You've got your cowboys and Indians, your rockers and good ol' dudes, middle-aged men and middle-aged women in Land's End winter parkas, yuppies carrying babies in shoulder slings, college kids, boys in "X" caps, little girls in hot-pink snow jackets, aging flower children in wool coats...
FEATURES
By MICHAEL & JANE STERN and MICHAEL & JANE STERN,Universal Press Syndicate | December 23, 1990
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- There are about three dozen varieties of corn bread in the South; and it is rare to come across a real Southern restaurant that doesn't serve it in one of its wondrous forms. There is basic corn bread, baked as individual rolls or in muffin tins, with or without cracklin's (chewy nuggets of baconlike pigmeat), jalapeno peppers or Cheddar cheese. There are corn dodgers, hush puppies and corn sticks cooked in old-fashioned tins that yield fat tubes of bread that resemble miniature ears of corn.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,special to the sun | January 6, 1999
Growing up in Tuscumbia, Ala., Wiley Mullins was always the ``heavy child'' in his family. With a love of Southern staples like sweet potatoes drenched in brown-sugar syrup and butter-saturated dishes, he seemed destined to become an overweight adult.But now, Mullins, 40, is the slimmed-down marketer of seasoning mixes aimed at flavoring food without extra calories. If you haven't heard of Uncle Wiley and his product, which is available locally at Giant Food, just wait.This month, Mullins - who has been called the George Washington Carver of the food world - will launch a national advertising campaign in Cooking Light magazine.
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