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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Baltimore native and Towson University graduate Mike Rowe informed fans on Thanksgiving Eve that the Discovery Channel show he hosted, "Dirty Jobs," was no more. Rowe, the show's creator and executive producer, wrote on his blog that it was canceled: "A few weeks ago, I was officially informed that Dirty Jobs had entered into a new phase," Rowe wrote on his blog. "One I like to call, 'permanent hiatus.' Or in the more popular industry vernacular, canceled. " "Dirty Jobs" was a reality show in which Rowe and his crew traveled across the country to document some of the most unsavory jobs.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Baltimore native and Towson University graduate Mike Rowe informed fans on Thanksgiving Eve that the Discovery Channel show he hosted, "Dirty Jobs," was no more. Rowe, the show's creator and executive producer, wrote on his blog that it was canceled: "A few weeks ago, I was officially informed that Dirty Jobs had entered into a new phase," Rowe wrote on his blog. "One I like to call, 'permanent hiatus.' Or in the more popular industry vernacular, canceled. " "Dirty Jobs" was a reality show in which Rowe and his crew traveled across the country to document some of the most unsavory jobs.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
As host of the Discovery Channel show "Dirty Jobs," Mike Rowe has taken work as a sewer inspector, pig farmer, mud bath mixer, maggot farmer, olive oil presser, and pigeon poop cleaner-upper. But all that's easy money compared to what could be his biggest challenge yet — convincing America that blue-collar work, especially the kind that may turn a stomach or break a back, is noble and necessary. The TV personality and Baltimore native has extended his "dirty boy" brand into a website, MikeRoweWorks.com, to highlight the decline in the trades and boost enrollment in trade schools.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
As host of the Discovery Channel show "Dirty Jobs," Mike Rowe has taken work as a sewer inspector, pig farmer, mud bath mixer, maggot farmer, olive oil presser, and pigeon poop cleaner-upper. But all that's easy money compared to what could be his biggest challenge yet — convincing America that blue-collar work, especially the kind that may turn a stomach or break a back, is noble and necessary. The TV personality and Baltimore native has extended his "dirty boy" brand into a website, MikeRoweWorks.com, to highlight the decline in the trades and boost enrollment in trade schools.
FEATURES
May 5, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Host Mike Rowe learns there's more to erosion control than one might think in Dirty Jobs (9 p.m., Discovery).
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By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2006
Mike Rowe was almost knee-deep in hardening bat excrement when he got stuck in the dark, muggy cave. Suddenly, he no longer paid attention to the thousands of screeching winged creatures overhead raining urine on him. The Baltimore-born host of the Discovery Channel show Dirty Jobs was sinking fast, his upper body inching closer to the flesh-eating beetles that scurried along the poop's surface. DIRTY JOBS airs at 9 p.m. Tuesday on the Discovery Channel
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By Peggy Rowe and Peggy Rowe,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2008
I DON'T REMEMBER EXACTLY when it happened, my transition from overprotective, fussy mother to world-weary show-biz mom. I just know that, when I turned on the television recently and saw my first born standing in fresh manure with his arm up the rear end of a bull, I didn't reach for a Valium. I merely shook my head and wondered for the hundredth time, How did this happen? Four years ago, my husband and I were enjoying the retirement that couples dream about. We had sold the house and moved into a condominium.
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By TOM JURAVICH | March 13, 1991
Like most people, I still have vivid memories of my first job. After my senior year in high school, my father got me one in the factory where he worked. I took my place among a dozen other college-bound sons on the shop floor.The message from the men at the mill was clear. We were to learn first-hand how bad factory work was and this would motivate us to study hard and get good white-collar jobs. This was in the '60s, and no self-respecting working man wanted his kid to live the life that he had.In the 20 years since my first job, a lot has changed.
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By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | March 29, 1992
BELGRADE -- After a lifetime's work abroad and accumulated savings of almost $1 million, Ilija Ruzic last year decided that it was time to patter off into a comfortable retirement in the rolling hills of southern Serbia.He sold his Paris home, took all his savings and returned to his native village, where he built his dream house with all modern conveniences and a garage for two cars.He deposited the rest of his money -- one million in Swiss francs -- with Yugoslav banks.At age 59, he planned to use his luxurious setup to do everything that he had secretly wanted to do: chase butterflies, make his own wines, prepare French food and take occasional trips back to France -- Mr. Ruzic is a naturalized French citizen -- to see old friends from the Marcel Dessault company, where he was an aircraft test mechanic for more than three decades.
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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1995
Roxanne Hatcher's day is filled with snarling dogs and dying kittens. Douglas Carter and his boys push trash around from dawn til dusk.Thousands of people -- from dog catchers to meter maids to waste water treatment plant operators -- have jobs the rest of us need done but can't imagine doing.Nobody grows up dreaming of putting softly purring kittens in a permanent sleep or powering a bulldozer through the stench of 800 tons of refuse a day.But they are jobs. Paying jobs. Jobs with futures.
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June 2, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Host Mike Rowe heads to an Oklahoma wind farm on Dirty Jobs (9 p.m., Discovery).
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By Peggy Rowe and Peggy Rowe,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2008
I DON'T REMEMBER EXACTLY when it happened, my transition from overprotective, fussy mother to world-weary show-biz mom. I just know that, when I turned on the television recently and saw my first born standing in fresh manure with his arm up the rear end of a bull, I didn't reach for a Valium. I merely shook my head and wondered for the hundredth time, How did this happen? Four years ago, my husband and I were enjoying the retirement that couples dream about. We had sold the house and moved into a condominium.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2006
Mike Rowe was almost knee-deep in hardening bat excrement when he got stuck in the dark, muggy cave. Suddenly, he no longer paid attention to the thousands of screeching winged creatures overhead raining urine on him. The Baltimore-born host of the Discovery Channel show Dirty Jobs was sinking fast, his upper body inching closer to the flesh-eating beetles that scurried along the poop's surface. DIRTY JOBS airs at 9 p.m. Tuesday on the Discovery Channel
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
For hockey, the floor of the Baltimore Arena is a sheet of gleaming ice. A carpet of hay greets the circus and polished hardwood goes down when basketball comes to town.But for the roar of indoor motocross racing -- in which the topography of open fields, landfills and quarries is re-created inside concrete sports palaces -- you need Mother Earth.Lots of it.Tons of it.Yard upon rich, brown yard of it.More than 120 trucks teeming with local fill dirt lumbered into the Baltimore Arena this week in preparation for this weekend's PACE Motor Sports Arenacross series of indoor motorbike races.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 27, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Distressing though it may be to the more devout advocates of highway safety, people who drive cars persist in smashing them up. This tendency makes work for insurance adjusters, for lawyers and for body-shop operators like my friend Bill Denny.It also makes work for technicians, such as painters and sheet-metal specialists, who can earn good money getting the dents out. In the body-shop world, salaries of $50,000 a year are common, and $100,000 -- in places like Washington and New York -- isn't unheard of. But there's a problem.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1995
Roxanne Hatcher's day is filled with snarling dogs and dying kittens. Douglas Carter and his boys push trash around from dawn til dusk.Thousands of people -- from dog catchers to meter maids to waste water treatment plant operators -- have jobs the rest of us need done but can't imagine doing.Nobody grows up dreaming of putting softly purring kittens in a permanent sleep or powering a bulldozer through the stench of 800 tons of refuse a day.But they are jobs. Paying jobs. Jobs with futures.
NEWS
August 5, 1992
Of the two million underground fuel storage tanks registered in the United States, a quarter of them are said to be leaking gasoline. Most are corroded containers beneath gas stations. In Maryland, 16,000 tanks are believed to be leaking.A recent federal law requires bad tanks to be replaced with leak-proof containers made of fiberglass or coated steel by 1998. The tainted dirt around the old tanks also will have to be removed and treated. These necessities have given rise to the relatively new "soil recycling" industry.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
Diving isn't Bob Croot's job. It's just the way he gets to work.Unlike some divers, Mr. Croot doesn't retrieve bodies or search for treasures. Instead, he rebuilds piers, rigs collapsed bridges, plants explosives underwater and mends phone and power cable lines."
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