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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Kyle Lear was a freshman soccer player trying out for the JV team at Arundel High when he had to make a choice between continuing in the sport or devoting his weekends to another of his longtime passions: racing cars. Soccer lost out. "They asked me to show up on a Saturday, and I told them I couldn't ," said Lear, who said he was racing. . "They thought I was joking. " For as long as Lear, who is now 25 years old, can remember, weekends have been devoted to racing. It began when he was 4 years old and Lear would race Big Wheels down the various tracks between his father's dirt car races in Southern Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania.
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By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A man who was operating a mini steamroller that rolled over and trapped him Wednesday afternoon has died, Baltimore County authorities said Thursday. Michael Ray Mathews, 64, of Freeland, was using the mini steamroller to flatten out a pile of dirt when the pile collapsed, causing the steamroller to roll over and trap him underneath, county police said. Another worker at the site, in the 600 block of Belfast Road in Sparks, used another piece of equipment to lift the steamroller so that Mathews could be pulled out. Mathews was taken to St. Joseph's Medical Center, where he later died.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Detective Hassan Rasheed had been watching the Northwest Baltimore repair shop for weeks as men brought dirt bikes in and out for repairs. Now police, intent on cracking down on illegal bikes, were prepared to move in. Armed with a search-and-seizure warrant, Rasheed and a team of officers gathered up 16 bikes. Some had been reported stolen. As the officers combed the West Belvedere Avenue repair shop, a crowd gathered outside the barbed-wire-topped fence. "I'm sure everyone's [angry]
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore police are investigating whether officers used excessive force in the arrest of a pair of West Baltimore brothers Sunday, the department said. Officers say that one man punched an officer as the two resisted arrest, while witnesses alleged that officers used unnecessary force in detaining the men following a dirt bike crash in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood. Charles Peters had just crashed his dirt bike into a tree on Laurens Street at about 1 p.m. when police arrived.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | June 28, 2006
What's the correct way to clean mushrooms? i've always heard that they shouldn't be washed in water. Mushrooms, according to scores of cookbooks, are extremely absorbent. To determine just how absorbent, I did a series of tests in my kitchen. I removed the stems from a package of button mushrooms and weighed the caps. Dry, they weighed 6 1/2 ounces. I soaked them for five minutes in cold water, towel-dried them and weighed them again. Now they weighed 8 1/2 ounces, a gain of 2 ounces.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Baltimore County police are continuing to investigate an attempted armed robbery where the suspects tried to steal dirt bikes as they were being loaded onto a truck in July. Police released on Friday a photo of a man they believe has information about the attempted robbery, where a gun was held to the victim's head in an industrial area in the 6900 block of Quad Ave., not far from Interstate 95, on July 28. The gunman fled into nearby woods and fired several rounds - striking the victim's truck - as the victim chased after him, police said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Baltimore police confiscated 15 dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles from storage units in the city's Park Circle neighborhood last week as part of a broader effort to combat use of the vehicles on city streets, officials said Tuesday. Six of the recreational vehicles, which are illegal to drive in the city, were identified as stolen and three others had "obliterated" serial numbers, which is the case for many dirt bikes and ATVs in the city, said Anthony Guglielmi, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Judith Dobler | February 20, 1992
AS A CHILD, I loved dirt, in mudpies and creeks and puddles. I was forever ruining my shoes in creek beds. One Sunday afternoon I lost two at once when I fell in the water. I loved the sound of the mud as it sucked at my feet and squished between my toes.I spent many days exploring an old deserted farm where raspberry canes, bearing juicy, ripe fruit by the pailful, grew from thick, black, wet Iowa soil. I shared my lunch with a neighbor's mutt and scaled the banks of a gully whose stream trickled in the hot summer sun.I walked through the weeds where grasshoppers flew in all directions like just-popping popcorn.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | August 5, 1991
FANS WHO are dreading the end of baseball on 33rd Street should take heart: They don't have to leave Memorial Stadium behind at the end of this season after all. They can keep a part of it with them forever.For only $8.95.That's the cost of a jar of authentic Memorial Stadium dirt that is being marketed to sentimental souvenir seekers by a local container manufacturer. The dirt, or "playing field surface" as it is labeled, goes on sale today. It comes in a 2-ounce bottle and on the front is the official Orioles logo, along with "1954-1991" and "A Season to Remember."
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 28, 1991
Selling the infield dirt and clippings from the grass the Baltimore Orioles play on throws professional dignity for a serious loss and, at the same time, makes management appear hard-pressed financially -- when such is hardly the case, considering the way the turnstiles are spinning.It's annoying to see the Orioles enter into a deal with an outside firm that charges the fans who patronize them $8.95 (rather $12.90 after taxes and shipping fees) for a two-ounce container of soil from Memorial Stadium, with a certificate of authenticity, that proves this is the real dirt.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zúñiga and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
With one out in the bottom of the fifth inning Saturday, Orioles center fielder Adam Jones forced the Toronto Blue Jays into a rushed throw and an error by racing down the first base line to beat out a ground ball. Then, the real fun began. When Jones turned to second base, he came face-to-face with first base umpire Hunter Wendelstedt. Jones put both arms out, tried to dodge the umpire and began to sprint down the baseline, but in the process Wendelstedt toppled backward and thudded into the infield dirt.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
A 28-year-old Westminster man was critically injured in Sykesville on Sunday in a dirt bike accident, according to the Carroll County Sheriff's Office. Officials said that at about 5 p.m., deputies and rescue personnel from the Sykesville Volunteer Fire Company were called to Poole and Cherrytree roads in the northern part of Sykesville west of Route 32 for a report of a motor vehicle crash, and found a Yamaha dirt bike on the southbound shoulder. Officials said they believe the driver was traveling south on Poole Road and lost control, causing him to be ejected off the dirt bike.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
The idea of providing an alternative venue for those who recklessly operate their dirt bikes in the city can be likened to providing sidewalks for the same people ( "Scofflaws on two wheels (and sometimes one)," May 15). How frequently do we encounter these same people walking in the street in large groups, ignoring the sidewalks? The alternative sites would be ignored for the thrill of creating danger and disruption on streets. The idea that the only harm caused by these riders is when officials pursue them is ludicrous.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
Regarding your editorial about dirt bikes and how they should be handled, you seem unable to understand that there is a way to stop the dirt bike madness on the streets and also generate money for Baltimore City ( "Scofflaws on two wheels (and sometimes one)," May 15). Granted, dirt bikes are illegal. But they also have conversion kits for lights and signals and can be converted and inspected by state officials, then registered just like a moped or motorcycle. There should be a minimum age of 17 for a cyclist license and a helmet law for all riders.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts is right to crack down on the city's notorious dirt bike riders by using social media and undercover officers to prevent them from disrupting traffic and putting motorists and pedestrians at risk. The unlicensed, unregistered two-wheeled menaces are famous for swarming intersections with dozens of vehicles a time, running red lights with impunity and recklessly zipping in and out of traffic lanes, forcing drivers to maneuver wildly to avoid collisions.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Baltimore police say they plan to crack down on the city's notorious dirt bike riders, pledging to infiltrate the groups using social media and undercover officers in an effort to disrupt the packs of riders. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said the popularity of the documentary "12 O'clock Boys" - a reference to the high-flying wheelie pose that riders strive to achieve - has "glorified" dirt bike riding and drawn enthusiasts from other states. It is illegal to operate the motorized bikes anywhere in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | June 8, 2009
Stevenson University President Kevin J. Manning has solicited and received many a gift in his years as a college administrator. But never one that could fill 2,500 dump trucks and inspire puns about both parties "hitting pay dirt" or "making the grade." No, the gift Stevenson is about to receive from T. Rowe Price - 25,000 cubic yards of dirt - is unique in Manning's experience. "Kind of creative in this challenging economy, huh?" Manning said. "I can't say I've heard of many universities fundraising for dirt, but it all adds up."
NEWS
April 15, 1994
Who would have thought dirt could be so useful?Residents of a tony subdivision in Howard County called River Glen wanted a barrier between their homes and nearby highways. The neighborhood is at U.S. 29 and Route 32, a few miles from Interstate 95 and the site of the tragic Pam Basu carjacking two years ago.The area doesn't qualify for the noise walls that the state has erected around sections of the Baltimore Beltway and at I-95 in Elkridge in recent years. (Besides, those walls, while effective, aren't the most eye-pleasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Seduction and rebellion are at the heart of "12 O'Clock Boys," Maryland Institute College of Art alum Lotfy Nathan's extraordinary exploration of Baltimore's outlaw dirt bike culture, as seen through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy desperately yearning to be part of it. For three years, beginning in spring 2010, Nathan and his cameras track the youngster, who goes by the nickname Pug. The camera watches as Pug is seduced by the speed, by the outrageousness and...
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Seth Wallace knew early on he wanted to race dirt bikes, just like he saw on YouTube. He's only 5, but the youngster from Nicholson, Pa., got his wish Sunday as one of 314 riders ages 4 and up to take part in amateur day at a weekend Arenacross event at the Baltimore Arena. In a series of races, up to 16 riders at a time bolted from the indoor dirt track's starting gate on motorized bikes, then fought for a clear path ahead. Kicking up dust, with engines roaring, they sped around hairpin turns, negotiated bumps and soared over hills.
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