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Director Of Planning

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NEWS
August 16, 1994
Barbara Houchen of Arnold has been named director of planning and research at Anne Arundel Community College.An associate professor of business administration at the college since 1985, Ms. Houchen has served as acting director of the planning and research office for the past year. Her responsibilities will include directing and coordinating the college strategic plan.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
A top Baltimore emergency manager is flying to the Philippines today to help medical teams after a typhoon killed thousands and displaced more than a half-million people. C.P. Hsia, director of planning for the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management, will be traveling to one of the most severely impacted areas with a team of contractors to "streamline delivery of medical care and supplies to the region," the mayor's office said.  Hsia is flying this morning to Tokyo, then to Manila, where a Philippine Air Force plane will take him to a disaster area, he said.  "It's going to be a huge challenge even getting here," he said.
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NEWS
August 28, 2001
The Carroll County commissioners have appointed Jeanne S. Joiner as the county's acting director of planning. Joiner began her career as a county planner in 1974, working her way up to bureau chief of planning in 1984 before resigning to raise her children. She returned to the department in 1994 as a planner and rose again to bureau chief in 1998. She holds a bachelor's degree in sociology from Western Maryland College and is a member of the American Planning Association. She replaces Steven C. Horn, the former director of planning, who resigned last month after 14 years to take the same post with neighboring Frederick County.
NEWS
December 18, 2007
Oliver Henry Fulton, a veteran of several technology corporations who later headed the Maryland Industrial Development Financing Authority for more than a decade, died of complications from pneumonia Dec. 9 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. He was 88 and lived on Gibson Island. Mr. Fulton was born and raised in Pittsburgh. When he was 16, he won a "World's Greatest Toy Contest" sponsored by A.C. Gilbert, the New Haven, Conn., manufacturer of the Erector Set and of American Flyer electric trains.
NEWS
February 27, 1996
Ronald C. Heacock, an official with Howard Community College, has been named senior director for strategic planning and grant development for the community colleges of Baltimore County.Dr. Heacock, who was selected after a national search, will earn $62,000 annually in the position that was created in the reorganization of the county's three colleges, in Catonsville, Dundalk and Essex. He was director of planning and evaluation at Howard.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2003
J. Steven Kaii-Ziegler, former director of planning and zoning for Queen Anne's County, has been selected as Harford County's director of planning and zoning. Kaii-Ziegler comes to the Harford County during the update of the 1996 master plan and land-use element plan, a process he is familiar with, having finished a similar project in Queen Anne's County a year ago. "It is attractive to me to work in an environment that is comparable to working experiences I have had in the past. I find them challenging and interesting," he said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
Otis Rolley III, the first deputy housing commissioner in Baltimore, is a candidate for director of planning, a job that has been vacant since November, according to City Hall officials. Charles C. Graves III, who held the post for nine years, moved to Atlanta to become that city's director of planning and neighborhood development. Rolley "has been interviewed by the planning commission and by the mayor and is a candidate" for the planning director's job, said Raquel Guillory, a spokeswoman for the mayor.
NEWS
November 30, 2004
Brian John Shuba, a pharmaceuticals salesman and former director of planning for Bon Secours Hospital, died Saturday of cardiac arrhythmia at Good Samaritan Hospital in Lebanon, Pa. He was 36, and had been a resident of Hagerstown since last year. "He had been diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat about four years ago," said his wife of three years, the former Jo Anna Elizabeth Varsalone, who is expecting the birth of their second child next week. Mr. Shuba was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and raised in Lebanon.
NEWS
March 6, 1997
Wayne Schuster, a member of Freedom Area Community Planning Council, has accepted a job as director of planning and development for six state airports in Rhode Island. He will move to Providence next month."This was not an easy decision," Schuster said. "For whatever problems Carroll County has, it surely is a nice place to live."Schuster, 44, has volunteered his planning expertise to several community groups that have lobbied for slower growth, particularly in South Carroll."There is going to be growth," he said.
NEWS
December 18, 2007
Oliver Henry Fulton, a veteran of several technology corporations who later headed the Maryland Industrial Development Financing Authority for more than a decade, died of complications from pneumonia Dec. 9 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. He was 88 and lived on Gibson Island. Mr. Fulton was born and raised in Pittsburgh. When he was 16, he won a "World's Greatest Toy Contest" sponsored by A.C. Gilbert, the New Haven, Conn., manufacturer of the Erector Set and of American Flyer electric trains.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,sun reporter | October 24, 2007
Kimberly Flowers knows what she's up against, and she's still excited about her new job. As deputy director for planning and zoning for Howard County, Flowers sees her greatest challenge as overcoming public distrust of the system. "I don't think they believe we have the citizens' best interests in mind," said Flowers, 35. "I think they believe that we are encouraging too much development and at too rapid of a pace. I've heard word on the street of cutting backroom deals with developers."
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
A performing arts center for Harford County cleared its last hurdle yesterday when the county Board of Education unanimously approved an expansion of the auditorium for the new Bel Air High School. Town and county officials have agreed to share the $2.5 million cost, over the next three years, to add 260 seats that will bring the auditorium's seating capacity to 800. When the $75 million school opens in 2009, student programs will have priority use of the auditorium, and the town will be able to schedule several dates a year for traveling shows as well as groups such as the Bel Air Community Band and Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2006
With a hearing on a proposal to develop houses on the Country Club of Maryland's golf course set for next month, a Baltimore County councilman says it is a "horse race" to get a community plan for the nearby Idlewylde neighborhood approved in time to limit the housing project. The county's planning board decided to table the Idlewylde plan until its July 20 meeting, which means the earliest that the County Council could vote on it would be Aug. 7. The public hearing on the country club development is scheduled for 9 a.m. July 7 and if necessary will continue at 9 a.m. July 14. The Idlewylde community plan calls for creating additional buffers between existing houses and new developments, including the one proposed by the club.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM | February 10, 2006
County's lost-time injuries declining Anne Arundel County employees had fewer recorded injuries that caused time lost on the job over the last three years, County Executive Janet S. Owens announced recently. Owens said there has been a 42 percent reduction in lost-time injuries, a 22 percent reduction in work days lost because of injuries and a 38 percent reduction in federally monitored Occupational Safety and Health Administration-reported injuries. Injuries reported to OSHA require time away from work or medical treatment beyond first aid. Better risk management helped bring down the rate of county workplace injuries, Owens said.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
The Cecil County Board of Commissioners is scheduled to decide tonight whether to amend its sewer and water plan to permit a hotly contested 300-home development and golf course north of Elkton. Residents have protested the project for more than a year, saying it would set a dangerous precedent and accelerate growth in the rural county while diverting water from current residents. Newark, Del.-based Aston Development Group Inc. won preliminary approval for its proposed Aston Pointe development from the planning commission in April but is still pushing for inclusion in the county's sewer and water master plan after being denied twice.
NEWS
November 30, 2004
Brian John Shuba, a pharmaceuticals salesman and former director of planning for Bon Secours Hospital, died Saturday of cardiac arrhythmia at Good Samaritan Hospital in Lebanon, Pa. He was 36, and had been a resident of Hagerstown since last year. "He had been diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat about four years ago," said his wife of three years, the former Jo Anna Elizabeth Varsalone, who is expecting the birth of their second child next week. Mr. Shuba was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and raised in Lebanon.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
The Cecil County Board of Commissioners is scheduled to decide tonight whether to amend its sewer and water plan to permit a hotly contested 300-home development and golf course north of Elkton. Residents have protested the project for more than a year, saying it would set a dangerous precedent and accelerate growth in the rural county while diverting water from current residents. Newark, Del.-based Aston Development Group Inc. won preliminary approval for its proposed Aston Pointe development from the planning commission in April but is still pushing for inclusion in the county's sewer and water master plan after being denied twice.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Mary Gail Hare and Brenda J. Buote and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
The Carroll Board of County Commissioners announced yesterday the reorganization of four departments, the elimination of several key positions and the goals of their four-year term, claiming the changes could save taxpayers $300,000.The commissioners said the county will save in salaries and benefits by eliminating six positions, most of them in the planning department. The changes take effect today."We're aiming for efficiency in government," said board President Julia Walsh Gouge. "We've outlined our goals for the next four years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Carroll Lutheran Village breaks ground today on a $64 million complex designed to attract active seniors who want to live their lives to the fullest. Wakefield Overlook will include 142 new homes and apartments surrounding a "mission square," a downtown concept for the retirement community that opened in Westminster more than 24 years ago. "This is designed for the future interest and taste of seniors, and it incorporates senior active adult trends," said Geary K. Milliken, president and chief executive officer of the village.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
Otis Rolley III, the first deputy housing commissioner in Baltimore, is a candidate for director of planning, a job that has been vacant since November, according to City Hall officials. Charles C. Graves III, who held the post for nine years, moved to Atlanta to become that city's director of planning and neighborhood development. Rolley "has been interviewed by the planning commission and by the mayor and is a candidate" for the planning director's job, said Raquel Guillory, a spokeswoman for the mayor.
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