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By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | July 6, 1998
THANK YOU, retired Navy Chief Petty Officer Zeno F. Brown, in Raymore, Mo.John Hawke Jr., the U.S. Treasury's undersecretary for domestic finance, thanks you, too.You alerted us both to something that the Defense Department shouldn't be doing. It has been unfairly muscling some of its retirees.Your personal issue is military pension checks, but the story is bigger than that. It also affects people receiving Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, federal disability, veterans benefits and federal checks to vendors -- everything but tax-refund checks.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
The state this month will begin sending all child support payments electronically, a move that the Maryland Department of Human Resources said Wednesday will save $1.4 million. The Child Support Enforcement Administration says eliminating the paper check option in favor of direct deposit and a new Electronic Payment Issuance Card for custodial parents will be easier, faster and safer for families. The state will save on the cost of printing and mailing checks. "Families shouldn't have to wait for a check to arrive by mail to receive child support payments we collect on their behalf," Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Ted Dallas said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Jim King and Jim King,Cox News Service | May 29, 1992
ATLANTA -- Mike Parker hates going to the bank.Taking time off work, searching for a parking spot and then standing in teller lines isn't his idea of convenience. That's why he decided 10 years ago to have his paychecks electronically deposited into his bank account.Now he says he wouldn't change back if you paid him."It's just a tremendous convenience," says Mr. Parker, a police major with the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. "With my job, it's hard to get to the [MARTA] credit union.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 23, 2012
The Abingdon Social Security office, at 3435A Box Hill Corporate Center Drive, will be closed for two weeks beginning Monday, April 30, for renovations. The office will reopen on Monday, May 14. "We are contacting everyone who had an appointment to visit the office during the time we will be closed," District Manager Nicole De Campli said in a statement announcing the temporary closing. "Those appointments are being rescheduled. However, telephone appointments will not be affected.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
If checks were outlawed, Steven S. Baum would shed no tears."I can not wait or the day they say checks can't be used," he said. "They are the merchant's worst nightmare."And while Baum does not have such sweeping legislative powers, he is doing his part to usher in the new world of electronic funds transfer, a system whereby money moves through wires rather than in a blizzard of checks and cash. Electronic funds transfer includes such common practices as direct deposit of payroll checks to more exotic arrangements that allow people to pay their bills by telephone.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
The state this month will begin sending all child support payments electronically, a move that the Maryland Department of Human Resources said Wednesday will save $1.4 million. The Child Support Enforcement Administration says eliminating the paper check option in favor of direct deposit and a new Electronic Payment Issuance Card for custodial parents will be easier, faster and safer for families. The state will save on the cost of printing and mailing checks. "Families shouldn't have to wait for a check to arrive by mail to receive child support payments we collect on their behalf," Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Ted Dallas said in a statement.
NEWS
By June Kurtz and June Kurtz,Contributing writer | February 5, 1992
The tide is turning, but there are still a few stragglers -- throwbacks to the Great Depression who are wary of banks and today's bankingtechnologies.Many Carroll seniors avoid automated teller machines, or ATMs, and some do not use direct deposit -- where Social Security and pension checks are deposited directly from the government and former employers into a bank account."I know we should have direct deposit. I've known it for years," said Betty L. Limstrom, 63. "And guess what? I can't bring myself to do it."
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 4, 2011
Citibank will start charging fees in December for several checking accounts that were formerly free , reports the Los Angeles Times. Customers can avoid the fees either by maintaining high balances or by downgrading to a basic account and commiting to direct deposit of paychecks along with at least one automatic payment. You could also keep a combined balance of $1,500 in checking and savings to avoid fees. The news comes on the heels of news that Bank of America will now be charging customers who use their debit cards to make purchases . Citi customers, have you received your notice in the mail?
NEWS
By Reid Cramer | August 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It's not often that we look to the dastardly IRS to come to our rescue. But the IRS recently announced the advent of a new tool that just might help avert a growing crisis - the disappearance of savings in the American economy. Beginning next year, taxpayers will be allowed to use direct deposit to divide their tax refunds among several accounts rather than receiving them in a lump sum. This will allow funds to go directly into savings, checking and retirement products. Because the IRS distributes more than $220 billion in refunds each year, and more than three-quarters of the nation's taxpayers receive them, this policy will create an ideal opportunity to connect tax refunds to saving opportunities.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 23, 2012
The Abingdon Social Security office, at 3435A Box Hill Corporate Center Drive, will be closed for two weeks beginning Monday, April 30, for renovations. The office will reopen on Monday, May 14. "We are contacting everyone who had an appointment to visit the office during the time we will be closed," District Manager Nicole De Campli said in a statement announcing the temporary closing. "Those appointments are being rescheduled. However, telephone appointments will not be affected.
EXPLORE
February 21, 2012
The Social Security Administration office at 110 West Road in Towson will officially relocate to the fourth floor of 28 Allegheny Ave., next week. The final day the office will be open on West Road is Friday, March 2. The new office will be open for business Tuesday, March 6. Office hours at the new location will remain weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free parking is available to Social Security office visitors on the fifth floor of the parking garage on Washington Avenue.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 4, 2011
Citibank will start charging fees in December for several checking accounts that were formerly free , reports the Los Angeles Times. Customers can avoid the fees either by maintaining high balances or by downgrading to a basic account and commiting to direct deposit of paychecks along with at least one automatic payment. You could also keep a combined balance of $1,500 in checking and savings to avoid fees. The news comes on the heels of news that Bank of America will now be charging customers who use their debit cards to make purchases . Citi customers, have you received your notice in the mail?
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2008
The first tax rebates began landing in taxpayers' bank accounts ahead of schedule yesterday, kicking off a $168 billion stimulus program to put cash in consumers' pockets and jolt the stalling economy. Sales-hungry retailers are jostling to capture a share, launching promotions to entice Americans to spend the money in their stores rather than using it to pay bills or stashing it away. Home Depot is promoting energy-efficient lights and appliances. Sears is kicking in an additional 10 percent for shoppers who put the entire amount into gift cards.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | April 29, 2007
For decades one statistic has barely budged: About half of American employees don't have a retirement plan at work. That means the retirement of tens of millions of people may be largely financed by Social Security unless they have set aside savings on their own or inherit a windfall. Now there's proposed legislation in Congress aimed at reducing that number by requiring employers that don't offer a 401(k) or any other retirement plan to do more. Under the legislation, such employers with more than 10 workers must give employees the opportunity to make payroll deductions into an individual retirement account.
NEWS
By Reid Cramer | August 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It's not often that we look to the dastardly IRS to come to our rescue. But the IRS recently announced the advent of a new tool that just might help avert a growing crisis - the disappearance of savings in the American economy. Beginning next year, taxpayers will be allowed to use direct deposit to divide their tax refunds among several accounts rather than receiving them in a lump sum. This will allow funds to go directly into savings, checking and retirement products. Because the IRS distributes more than $220 billion in refunds each year, and more than three-quarters of the nation's taxpayers receive them, this policy will create an ideal opportunity to connect tax refunds to saving opportunities.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2003
After years of gentle persuasion, the Maryland state employee pension system is getting tough with retirees who have not signed up for direct deposit of benefits. Next month, no checks will be sent out - unless the retiree has a compelling reason not to use electronic funds transfer. The decision, which has provoked complaints from some older pensioners, follows a nine-month campaign to prepare recipients for mandatory direct deposit into their bank accounts. Joseph M. Coale, spokesman for the $26.7 billion system, said that more than 91,000 of the plan's 93,000 retirees have responded to entreaties to move to direct deposit.
EXPLORE
February 21, 2012
The Social Security Administration office at 110 West Road in Towson will officially relocate to the fourth floor of 28 Allegheny Ave., next week. The final day the office will be open on West Road is Friday, March 2. The new office will be open for business Tuesday, March 6. Office hours at the new location will remain weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free parking is available to Social Security office visitors on the fifth floor of the parking garage on Washington Avenue.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | July 28, 1997
IF YOU'RE GETTING any government benefits -- Social Security, veterans benefits, welfare, whatever -- you can kiss your checks goodbye.In a year and a half, the government is going out of the check-writing business. Instead, your check will be deposited electronically into your own account or an account set up for you.Congress ordered the change last year as a money-saving move. The U.S. Treasury will propose a structure for the program within the next few weeks.You may have resisted direct deposit in the past because you mistrust invisible payments.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | June 14, 1999
THE FEDERAL government has some soul-searching to do, about its responsibilities.It's on a campaign to distribute most government payments electronically, including Social Security and veterans benefits.You're still allowed to get paper checks. But having the money wired to your bank account is more secure.Direct deposit is easy for people with traditional bank accounts. But what about the 6 million federal beneficiaries without bank accounts, most of them poor?New kinds of accounts are being developed, to make direct deposit attractive to those who are currently unbanked.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | July 6, 1998
THANK YOU, retired Navy Chief Petty Officer Zeno F. Brown, in Raymore, Mo.John Hawke Jr., the U.S. Treasury's undersecretary for domestic finance, thanks you, too.You alerted us both to something that the Defense Department shouldn't be doing. It has been unfairly muscling some of its retirees.Your personal issue is military pension checks, but the story is bigger than that. It also affects people receiving Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, federal disability, veterans benefits and federal checks to vendors -- everything but tax-refund checks.
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