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By SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN and SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
After posing for photos, Chinese diplomats led guests through their new, $13 million embassy in Canberra, Australia, a dramatic pagoda-style building with a swimming pool, tennis courts, greenhouse and sweeping lake views.But the grand opening in August 1990 would have been ruined had the diplomats known everything about their elegant chancery.Thirty U.S. agents had worked for months to lace the concrete and drywall of every office with fiber-optic listening devices, their fine, glass threads undetectable in security sweeps.
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NEWS
April 1, 2014
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. errs in claiming that the American diplomats taken hostage by Iran were freed in 1979 ( "Drawing insults, not fear, from our foes," March 30). The diplomats were actually taken hostage in November of 1979 - not freed that year. They spent 444 days in captivity before finally being released on Jan. 20, 1981, the day Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as president. Their release followed complex and lengthy negotiations between the Iranians and the administration of President Jimmy Carter.
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NEWS
December 15, 1990
Ambassador W. Nathaniel Howell and seven other American diplomats who kept the flag flying over the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait for 110 days after they were ordered out by the Iraqi invaders are American heroes in the finest tradition.They followed the orders of their president. They also used their ingenuity, in such matters as digging a well. They suffered privation. (How many contemporary Americans are prepared to live without electricity or hot water for one day, much less 110, some of them among the world's hottest?
NEWS
January 13, 2014
I have been duped. When I heard of Dennis Rodman's initial visit to North Korea, I held onto a sliver of hope that it would possibly open a window of diplomatic negotiations with the nation ensconced in secrecy and carefully crafted propaganda ("Rodman, in trouble over interview, blames drink," Jan. 9). I couldn't have been more wrong. Mr. Rodman is simply a self-serving man who seeks media attention, not unlike that of the Kardashian clan. Mr. Rodman knows nothing about American missionary Kenneth Bae, and proved it in during a drunken rant at a recent press conference.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | October 30, 1990
There will be only one American Soccer League team in the Baltimore-Washington area next season -- the Maryland Bays.Yesterday, the Bays, American Professional Soccer League champions, and the Washington Stars merged, and the Washington Diplomats folded. The new franchise, which will continue to play its home games at Cedar Lane Park in Columbia, still will be known as the Maryland Bays.The team will be governed by a three-man board of directors, John Koskinen and Gordon Bradley, owners of the Stars, and John Liparini, owner of the Bays.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 11, 1991
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- In the stately French Embassy, the paper shredder had stopped for a moment.At the Canadian Embassy, Ambassador Christopher Poole pondered whether it was worth a long and dangerous drive through the desert to haul classified communications equipment out of Baghdad.At the U.S. Embassy, the chief diplomat, Thomas C. Wilson, waited in a florid purple necktie and alligator-skin shoes for the final orders to fly out of Iraq tomorrow morning.And at another embassy, a blond, red-cheeked Western woman wondered what would become of her Iraqi-soldier husband and her two children when the war started.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 22, 1990
AMMAN, Jordan -- Iraq ordered yesterday the expulsion of three U.S. diplomats and military attaches from 11 Western European countries as it warned the nations allied against it in the Persian Gulf, "Let everybody understand that this battle is going to become the mother and father of all battles."It also restricted the movements of diplomats remaining there in an action that appeared to be retaliation for similar diplomatic moves by Western European countries earlier this week.The expulsions came a few hours after Iraq issued a warning that seemed to accept all-out war as inevitable.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2007
LONDON -- U.S. and European diplomats prepared yesterday to consider possible new sanctions in the standoff over Iran's nuclear program, even as Iran's top nuclear negotiator signaled again that Tehran would be willing to engage in "constructive and logical" negotiations with the U.S. As representatives of the U.N. Security Council nations plus Germany met here in the wake of Iran's latest refusal to halt its uranium-enrichment efforts, there were signs...
NEWS
September 1, 1991
Franklin & MarshallDiplomatsCoach: Tom Gilburg, 17th yearAssistant coaches: Glenn Adamire, Al Brooks, Tom Caterbone, Tony DiPaolo, Ken Pederson, Mark Snyder, Don Hess, Jim McMahonLast year's record: 3-7-0 overall, 2-5 and tied for sixth in Centennial Football ConferenceTop returnees: Seniors, running back Jake Kolen, offensive linemen Paul Kelly, Steve Carroll, Pete Spinner, defensive end Alberto Mascaro, defensive linemanKevin Murray; juniors, defensive back...
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 4, 1995
TEHRAN, Iran -- There is only limited evidence to support President Clinton's depiction of Iran as a country bent on terrorism and rushing to acquire nuclear arms, according to diplomats closely studying developments here.Iran might hope to develop nuclear weapons in a decade, the diplomats say, and does give rhetorical and some financial support to outlaw groups.But the diplomats and other analysts in the region suggest that the threat from Iran is exaggerated by the United States, and that the U.S. plan to isolate Iran may only increase the regime's radicalism.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | September 10, 2013
Vladimir Putin may be the world's most hypocritical leader. The debate over the Syrian chemical weapons attack has brought this into sharp focus. The Russian president has repeatedly called the idea that the Syrian government carried out the attack "absurd" and "utter nonsense. " That leaves only one alternative: Syrian rebels did it — an idea that is absurd, utter nonsense. First of all, Syrian President Bashar Assad is already responsible for the brutal killing of more than 100,000 of his own people — using billions of dollars worth of weapons Mr. Putin sold him. Why would it be surprising that he used a different method to slaughter a mere 1,400 more, including at least 400 children?
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The disagreement between Mary Ellen Barbera and Glenn T. Harrell Jr. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but that didn't stop them from meeting for lunch in Washington after oral arguments in the case. Barbera and Harrell, both judges on Maryland's highest court, were on opposite sides of a hard-fought case over the collection of DNA from suspects arrested for violent crimes. Harrell wrote the majority opinion striking down the practice; Barbera criticized his reasoning in a dissent.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
Whether the House investigation into the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, is a political witch hunt aimed at former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her possible run for president in 2016, as Democrats allege, or a principled effort to uncover a shocking scandal on par with Watergate, as Republicans seem to believe, further review of what happened that night in Libya appears to be a worthwhile pursuit. That's not to suggest the American people should buy the narrative presented by Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, that there's been some grand, conspiratorial cover-up before, during or after that fateful night.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Friends and former classmates gathered Saturday at Johns Hopkins University to remember Anne Smedinghoff, a Foreign Service officer who was killed in a bombing in Afghanistan earlier this month, sharing stories of a too-short life marked by adventure. As photographs of Smedinghoff in front of monuments and ruins around the world flashed by on projector screens, friends recalled her various escapades, including a coast-to-coast cycling trip, which saw the young woman eat a live bug to fulfill an item on a scavenger hunt list.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 3, 2012
There was a time when a president and the opposition party in Congress could agree on certain basics, such as the right of the chief executive to select members of his cabinet with no fuss or bother. The president's most important choice in this regard was of his secretary of state, the first among supposed equals in the cabinet and once at the top of the ladder in terms of presidential succession after the vice president. That pecking order was changed by statute to elevate the speaker of the House and then the Senate president pro tem on the list, on the premise that anyone ascending to the presidency under the Constitution ought to have first been an elected official.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
After a long drive from Arizona, prosecutors say, Dmytro Holovko pulled up to a meeting spot on Liberty Road and unloaded hundreds of pounds of marijuana - another successful shipment for a drug ring accused of using Baltimore as a hub in a distribution network that brought in $1 million a month. Holovko, a 54-year-old Czech national, stands accused of being a courier for the violent organization, in a case that brought a consul from the Czech Embassy to a federal courtroom in Baltimore on Tuesday amid complaints about the defendant's court-appointed lawyer.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1994
BEIJING -- China is going forward with plans to detonate a hydrogen bomb at its underground test range at Lop Nor, Western diplomats say, and the test could come within days of President Clinton's expected decision to renew China's favorable trade access to the U.S. market.Communist Party leaders appear to be delaying the explosion for political, not technical reasons. Western diplomats believe that it could come at any time.The military purpose for this test is not regarded as threatening by Western governments, which see it as a predictable upgrade of China's relatively small strategic nuclear force.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 27, 1990
UNITED NATIONS -- Iraq demanded yesterday that the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad supply the names of non-diplomats who may be hiding in embassy compounds, reiterating its earlier threat to execute anyone protecting foreigners.Secretary of State James A. Baker III swiftly rejected the demand and said it would not affect U.S. policy."We've received a note to that effect. . . . It falls under the heading of the principle of the three R's, I think: We've read it, it's repugnant and we reject it."The communication came in the form of an Iraqi government circular.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | November 4, 2012
Franklin & Marshall built a 14-point third-quarter lead and held off a late rally to pull off a 14-12 upset over visiting Johns Hopkins on Saturday. The win, Franklin & Marshall's first against Johns Hopkins since 2007, ends the Blue Jays' 22-game regular-season winning streak and their 20-game Centennial Conference winning streak. The Blue Jays (8-1, 7-1) trailed 14-6 late in the fourth quarter before Braden Anderson directed a 14-play, 84-yard drive that Jonathan Rigaud capped with a 7-yard touchdown run with 27 seconds remaining.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
The most frightening, harrowing aspect of this raid on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi has to do with the presidents of Libya and the United States ("Libya guards: We were overwhelmed, outgunned," Oct. 11). The Libyan president said that our entire government lied out loud. He knew. President Barack Obama blamed Libya for not securing diplomats in their borders. Do you agree that this is beyond frightening? What have we done? Who do we believe? I am inclined to believe the President of Libya rather than my own. How did we come to this?
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