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NEWS
November 25, 2013
The city social services workers who sent dozens of local foster care youth to an unlicensed out-of-state religious school that hands out high school diplomas in exchange for a $500 fee and a single day of tests may have thought they were helping smooth the way to higher education or a job. In fact, they were perpetuating a cruel hoax by giving the youth the impression they met all the qualifications for college or a career when in fact they had not....
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
There was a mistake, Johns Hopkins University officials told Amanda Valledor at Thursday's graduation.  Her diploma had been misplaced, and the biomedical engineering student would have to wait, they said.  A few minutes later, a man came to hand Valledor the diploma. It was her father, Col. John Valledor, whom she had not seen since he left for Afghanistan last year.  He had not been scheduled to return home until next month.  Valledor, 22, froze for an instant, then ran into her father's arms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Regina Friend will don her son's ceremonial cap Thursday morning and take footsteps that were supposed to be his. The mere idea of those steps gives her chills, but she will take them. Her only child worked 41/2 years to earn a diploma from Temple University, and she will collect it, proud as any other parent in the room. "He's not here to accept it," the Cockeysville resident said. "So as his mother, and I'm still his mother, I need to get it for him. " Last August, Roswell Friend — Dulaney High graduate, college athlete, selfless friend, soon-to-be Temple alum — went for a run over a Philadelphia bridge and never came back.
NEWS
March 9, 2006
The Maryland Adult External High School Diploma Program allows participants to take between six months and a year to earn a high school diploma. The program is self-paced and allows applicants to work at their own pace. The total cost is $200. Several information sessions will be held at the Community College of Baltimore County, Essex Campus at 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays this month and next. The first of two evening sessions will take place at 6:30 tonight. Additional information sessions will be held at the CCBC Catonsville Campus starting Monday.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
Howard Community College will hold its 23rd annual Diploma Recognition Ceremony at 3 p.m. Oct. 28 in the Smith Theater, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. The ceremony will recognize students who have earned a Maryland high school diploma in the past year through the college's Adult Basic Education programs. A reception for graduates, their friends and families will be held after the ceremony in the Kittleman Room of the English, Language and Business Building (ELB 100). Margaret Kahlor, director of media arts and HCC TV, will speak to the group of about 30 graduates.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
When Gregory Seward picked up his high school diploma last night, he ended an academic career that featured straight A's, quarterbacking the football team and playing on the school's lacrosse team with his younger brother.The 17-year-old athlete and honor student was one of 216 seniors who graduated from Hammond High School in Columbia during a ceremony at the Merriweather Post Pavilion."I enjoyed high school a lot but I'm ready to move on," said Greg, the son of Arthur and Gay Seward of King's Contrivance.
NEWS
By Sally Buckler and Sally Buckler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1995
SHE HAS SEEN many Glenelg students cross the stage to receive Maryland high school diplomas in her 22 years as day custodian at Glenelg High School. Sunday was the day Eldine Angles made her own walk across the stage, stretched out her hand and received her diploma.Ms. Angles' stage was at Howard Community College in the 11th annual Diploma Recognition Ceremony. She achieved her goal by participating in the External Diploma Program, in which she proved her skills in writing, math, reading and much more.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
Columbia grandmother Barbara Kleinhen earns her high school diploma today, after years of preaching to her children about the importance of finishing school.Ms. Kleinhen, a 54-year-old postal worker who is deaf, dropped out of high school almost 40 years ago. But with the help of a sign language interpreter who attended adult education classes with her, she was able to pass all of her tests to earn a diploma through the General Educational Development (GED) program.She's one of more than 30 nontraditional students who will graduate from Howard Community College's adult education program at a ceremony at Smith Theatre.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Your report about Baltimore City foster care youth sent to earn high school diplomas at Philadelphia's Crooked Places Christian academy "made straight" a dilemma that the City Council's Education Committee and its partners have long anticipated and struggled to resolve ( "Baltimore foster care youths get diploma in a day in Philadelphia," Nov. 23). As the state phases in a law requiring either a diploma or school attendance until age 18, hundreds of our older students lack flexible alternatives for graduating from high school - alternatives that accommodate and respect their adult roles as parents, family providers, sibling caregivers and employees.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
I am sure that there will be great criticism about Baltimore social services workers' decision to have foster kids get their diplomas in a day through a school in Philadelphia ( "Diplomas in a day," Nov. 25). While it may not be the best way for these children to get their diplomas, we need to think about why these kids are in this situation. Traditional school is not for everyone. Children in foster care are often traumatized, moving from place to place, and therefore from school to school.
NEWS
By Craig Cummings | November 29, 2013
A recent article, " Baltimore foster care youths get diploma in a day in Philadelphia," Nov. 24) describing the referral of youths in foster care to a high school diploma program in Pennsylvania, highlights one of the glaring deficiencies in Maryland's educational programs - the lack of educational options for students in high school. While Maryland may have the highest ranking school system in the nation, its one-size-fits all approach to educating high school students leaves many of our most at-risk students without reasonable options for securing a high school diploma.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
The city social services workers who sent dozens of local foster care youth to an unlicensed out-of-state religious school that hands out high school diplomas in exchange for a $500 fee and a single day of tests may have thought they were helping smooth the way to higher education or a job. In fact, they were perpetuating a cruel hoax by giving the youth the impression they met all the qualifications for college or a career when in fact they had not....
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
The Baltimore Department of Social Services on Monday pledged a comprehensive review of alternative education programs for foster children, after revelations that it paid $40,000 to send students to a school in Philadelphia where they obtained a diploma in one day. The Crooked Places Made Straight Academy, where 80 youths from Baltimore took a three-hour exam to obtain a Pennsylvania high school diploma, shut down its one-day program Friday after...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The journey to a high school diploma for most Maryland students spans four years, 720 days of classes, and a slate of state tests. But for dozens of Baltimore youths, the journey has involved a two-hour trip up Interstate 95, a three-hour exam and a $500 check. Over the past year and a half, the Baltimore City Department of Social Services paid $40,000 of taxpayer money to send youths in foster care to a private Christian school in Philadelphia where they have obtained a high school diploma in one day. Social Services officials defend the program, despite its unusual method of providing diplomas.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | May 22, 1991
Rick Long Khem will end his school career in June with a fistful of awards, but he will not graduate and may not be allowed his moment onthe stage with the other members of the Class of 1991.Khem, a 21-year-old Cambodian and the adopted son of Herbert "H" and Ellen Longof Savage, is unique. He is the only student in his English teacher's memory to enter the county school system's English for Speakers of Other Languages program illiterate in his native language.He was 17 when he started school in Maryland.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | March 15, 1991
A headline in yesterday's editions of The Sun gave an incorrect number of years for the period of time from Ferdinand Korff's graduation from the University of Maryland to now. The correct number is 73.The Sun regrets the error.In an outdoor ceremony, with his father watching proudly, Ferdinand Korff received his diploma on May 30, 1917, from what is now the University of Maryland College Park. There was little applause -- only about 40 graduates in all -- and, after declining a second lieutenant's commission, Mr. Korff took the next train home to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Richard Stem left Westminster High School before graduation to join the military at the start of World War II, and he never returned to pick up his diploma. Now, the 93-year-old is set to become one of the earliest graduates of the class of 2014. On Wednesday, the Carroll County Board of Education will award Stem a high school diploma under a 2000 state law that allows World War II veterans who left for service as seniors in high school before graduation to be awarded diplomas. He will coincidentally receive his diploma the same week he and other current and former military personnel nationwide observe Veterans Day. Carroll County officials said such diplomas do not designate which school the graduate attended and make no mention of the recipient's original graduation year.
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