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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russia's diphtheria epidemic is worsening, with more than 4,000 cases already reported this year, the same number as for all of last year, and more than 100 deaths.This fallout from the collapse of the Soviet Union and its increasingly creaky system of health care prompted Russia last week to announce a mass immunization program over the next two years.By contrast, in the mid-1970s, there were fewer than 200 cases a year of diphtheria in the entire Soviet Union. In the United States last year, there were four cases.
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NEWS
August 20, 2002
A reminder has been issued to parents that their children must have the proper immunizations before returning to school or college in Baltimore County. Children starting kindergarten or first grade must have had vaccinations for hepatitis B and chickenpox. That is in addition to immunization for diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps, rubella (German measles) and polio, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Parents of college-bound students living on campus must show proof of vaccination for meningitis or have a signed waiver indicating that he or she chose not to receive the shot.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993
In Tuesday's Carroll County editions, the usual timing of children's immunizations was listed incorrectly. Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis shots are usually given at 2, 4, 6 and 18 months and oral polio vaccines at 2, 4 and 18 months.* The Sun regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 22, 2001
Boy meets his double from many years ago Borders Books & Music in Bowie holds a discussion group for kids in fourth through sixth grade Tuesday. Participants will analyze the 1994 book "Time for Andrew: A Ghost Story" by Mary Downing Hahn. Andrew is a 12-year-old who's been sent to his great-aunt's 19th-century house in Missouri for the summer so his parents can join an archaeological dig in France. Almost immediately, Andrew has the uneasy feeling he's being watched. But by whom? He soon gets his answer - while exploring his aunt's attic, he comes face to face with his look-alike, a boy gravely sick with diphtheria.
NEWS
January 20, 1999
Edgar Nollner Sr., 94, the last survivor of a desperate 1925 dog team relay that carried diphtheria serum to Nome, Alaska, died Monday in the Yukon River village of Galena. The serum relay inspired the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, an annual 1,100-mile run from Anchorage, Alaska, to Nome that began in 1973.
NEWS
August 20, 2002
A reminder has been issued to parents that their children must have the proper immunizations before returning to school or college in Baltimore County. Children starting kindergarten or first grade must have had vaccinations for hepatitis B and chickenpox. That is in addition to immunization for diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps, rubella (German measles) and polio, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Parents of college-bound students living on campus must show proof of vaccination for meningitis or have a signed waiver indicating that he or she chose not to receive the shot.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1995
While "Balto" is fairly well-done and has a compelling story, it doesn't have anywhere near the magic of "Toy Story" and other (( movies from Disney."Balto" is the animated tale of the diligent sled dog who saved an Alaskan town from a diphtheria epidemic when he retrieved some antitoxin during a savage blizzard. It's based on a true story: The wolfhound is memorialized by a statue in New York's Central Park and by the Iditarod race, which follows Balto's life-saving route.Now, "diphtheria" and "antitoxin" are not exactly words that scream "Cartoon!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 22, 2001
Boy meets his double from many years ago Borders Books & Music in Bowie holds a discussion group for kids in fourth through sixth grade Tuesday. Participants will analyze the 1994 book "Time for Andrew: A Ghost Story" by Mary Downing Hahn. Andrew is a 12-year-old who's been sent to his great-aunt's 19th-century house in Missouri for the summer so his parents can join an archaeological dig in France. Almost immediately, Andrew has the uneasy feeling he's being watched. But by whom? He soon gets his answer - while exploring his aunt's attic, he comes face to face with his look-alike, a boy gravely sick with diphtheria.
FEATURES
March 31, 1991
Junkets for baseball junkiesBaseball junkies can savor six multigame junkets in July and August, promoted by Sports Tours Inc. The trips last four or five days and range from $575 to $695 per person, based on double occupancy, excluding transportation to the trips' point of origin.Most of the trips include lodging in two cities and four or five pro baseball games. For example, the "California Express" tour features two games in San Francisco's Candlestick Park, one in the Oakland Coliseum, one in San Diego's Jack Murphy Stadium and one in Los Angeles' Dodgers Stadium.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Medical missionary Dr. Albert Schweitzer carried a copy up the Ogooue River in Africa. Rear Adm. Richard E. Byrd packed one in a sled as he crossed the Antarctic ice. Generations of general practitioners have relied on it. Military doctors and feverish Peace Corps volunteers have profited from its pithy counsel.It is the Merck Manual, a book that tries to cram 1,800 years of Western medical tradition into a one-volume encyclopedia. This year marks its centennial. To celebrate, the hefty 17th edition comes packaged with a facsimile of the first, published in 1899.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Medical missionary Dr. Albert Schweitzer carried a copy up the Ogooue River in Africa. Rear Adm. Richard E. Byrd packed one in a sled as he crossed the Antarctic ice. Generations of general practitioners have relied on it. Military doctors and feverish Peace Corps volunteers have profited from its pithy counsel.It is the Merck Manual, a book that tries to cram 1,800 years of Western medical tradition into a one-volume encyclopedia. This year marks its centennial. To celebrate, the hefty 17th edition comes packaged with a facsimile of the first, published in 1899.
NEWS
January 20, 1999
Edgar Nollner Sr., 94, the last survivor of a desperate 1925 dog team relay that carried diphtheria serum to Nome, Alaska, died Monday in the Yukon River village of Galena. The serum relay inspired the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, an annual 1,100-mile run from Anchorage, Alaska, to Nome that began in 1973.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1995
While "Balto" is fairly well-done and has a compelling story, it doesn't have anywhere near the magic of "Toy Story" and other (( movies from Disney."Balto" is the animated tale of the diligent sled dog who saved an Alaskan town from a diphtheria epidemic when he retrieved some antitoxin during a savage blizzard. It's based on a true story: The wolfhound is memorialized by a statue in New York's Central Park and by the Iditarod race, which follows Balto's life-saving route.Now, "diphtheria" and "antitoxin" are not exactly words that scream "Cartoon!"
NEWS
September 2, 1993
In Tuesday's Carroll County editions, the usual timing of children's immunizations was listed incorrectly. Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis shots are usually given at 2, 4, 6 and 18 months and oral polio vaccines at 2, 4 and 18 months.* The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russia's diphtheria epidemic is worsening, with more than 4,000 cases already reported this year, the same number as for all of last year, and more than 100 deaths.This fallout from the collapse of the Soviet Union and its increasingly creaky system of health care prompted Russia last week to announce a mass immunization program over the next two years.By contrast, in the mid-1970s, there were fewer than 200 cases a year of diphtheria in the entire Soviet Union. In the United States last year, there were four cases.
FEATURES
March 31, 1991
Junkets for baseball junkiesBaseball junkies can savor six multigame junkets in July and August, promoted by Sports Tours Inc. The trips last four or five days and range from $575 to $695 per person, based on double occupancy, excluding transportation to the trips' point of origin.Most of the trips include lodging in two cities and four or five pro baseball games. For example, the "California Express" tour features two games in San Francisco's Candlestick Park, one in the Oakland Coliseum, one in San Diego's Jack Murphy Stadium and one in Los Angeles' Dodgers Stadium.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has unveiled an aggressive plan to immunize millions of young U.S. children -- particularly in cities where large numbers remain unprotected.Only about two-thirds of children younger than 2 now receive all the immunizations they need. The record is far worse for inner cities, where research indicates that half of the children have not been immunized against preventable diseases."We've got to do a better job of dealing with the health, the nutrition, the educational and emotional needs of our very youngest children if we expect to have the kind of future that Americans deserve," Mr. Clinton said during a ceremony yesterday at the White House.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
Children aren't the only ones who need vaccinations against serious illnesses. Adults need them too, say three Blue Cross and Blue Shield health maintenance organizations.Carefirst, FreeState Health Plan and Potomac Health, which have health centers in Howard County, recently mailed about 5,000 fact sheets encouraging adult immunizations. "We're doing very well with pediatric immunizations," said Greta Brand, health education manager for CFS Health Group, which manages the three HMOs. "We wanted to bring immunization a step further."
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